Chris Chris 's Comments (member since Jan 01, 2016)


Chris 's comments from the Fantasy Book Club group.

(showing 141-160 of 860)

10915 Because they were all over the place? Miéville probably wanted to convey the fact that everywhere Deeba turned, there were unbrellas.
10915 Unstible, yeah. And the smombies. They were delightfully wretched and creepy.

And the giraffes. That is a hilarious concept to me.
10915 I agree on all counts. It could be distracting to see a garbage can with legs before the binjas are introduced, and so forth.

But the pictures were great. I really found them useful in visualizing the utterlings. I had to go back and look at the picture of Cauldron when he'd do someething, so I could get a mental picture of it.

And I loved, absolutely loved, the carnivorous giraffe.
10915 Yeah, the spider-windows were pretty creepy/weird.

I'd also say that Mr. Speaker was disturbing, with that mouth that was bigger than his head. Wait...I work with a lady like that.
10915 Walken would work, though it wouldn't be as surprising when he turned villain.

HBC would have to be in it if Tim Burton directed (as I requested in my review). Lecturn was too boring to me for her though. She'd be great as "the book", though she'd only be a voice then.
10915 I'm getting slow in my old age.
10915 Along those lines, I liked where Deeba confronted the two old bishops and convinced them that they didn't want the crown of the black or white king. She really was able to cut to the chase and get to the UnGun a lot quicker that way.
10915 I agree on Brokkenbroll. I thought he made a grand entrance and he immediately became my favorite. Right away I pictured Johnny Depp playing the part and that never left my mind. But y'all are right. He fell so flat as a villain at the end that I was disappointed. It was almost as bad as watching Boba Fett fall into the sand monster's mouth.
10915 Starting this one tonight....
Aug 31, 2010 06:36AM

10915 Elvet wrote: "I really liked The Golden Key. It is a collaborative story by Melanie Rawn, Kate Elliott, and Jennifer Robertson."

That should actually read Jennifer Roberson. I've fixed the errors in the listing.
10915 Here's my review for A Song for Arbonne: http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/...


I also read Tigana last year and became an instant Kay fan. My review: http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/...

...and my review for Sailing to Sarantium, to have them all together: http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/...
10915 What other works have you read by Guy Gavriel Kay?

In the Fantasy Book Club, we read A Song for Arbonne as a group a few months ago. Guy himself was gracious enough to stop by and answer some reader questions. It was fantastic! You can find the questions in the folder for that novel: http://www.goodreads.com/topic/group_...

If you've read both books, how do they compare? How does Sailing to Sarantium compare to his other novels? Feel free to mention what Kay books you've read even if you haven't read Sailing to Sarantium.

Just please avoid posting spoilers here for any of the books.
10915 In Part II, Crispin and company have arrived in Sarantium at last. While his journey to get there was fascinating, a whole new sequence of events happens now that he has come to the Empire's capital.

What did you think of the chariot races, specifically the one where we get a play by play? What are your thoughts on Scortius to this point? Is he one of the good guys, or someone to watch since he switched sides in the Blue/Green feud?

Speaking of the longtime rivalry between the Blue and Green factions, what are your thoughts on that to this point? We are introduced to it in the prologue, but now in the "current" storyline we see that it's still very prevalent in the Empire.

There are intrigues and double dealings and plots within plots surrounding the Emperor and his subjects. What do you think of these?

Who can Crispin trust, and who should he watch out for?

For that matter, what are your thoughts on the Emperor and Empress? Are they friends to Crispin, or should he watch his back?

Much of this should be revealed in Lord of Emperors, so this could be a place to talk about speculations. If you've already gone ahead and read the other book, please refrain from revealing anything here.
10915 This is one thing I like about Kay's work. It inspires thought beyond the pages and can even help open an awareness to the arts and history. He also makes it all so not-boring.
10915 That's the beauty of his books, Jeff. You don't have to be a history buff, nor know anything about it at all to enjoy his story. He doesn't assume that you know anything about it at all.

I've found that having a little knowledge of the history, or at least the geographical area he is using, helps with name pronunciation.
10915 I felt much the same way at times, Lisa. But I think much of that will be unveiled in the second book (which I still need to read). So I'm holding off on negative judgment until I see the whole mosaic.

It was rather slow in parts, but to me the parts weren't very long. And even slow parts in a Kay novel work because his writing style is so well crafted. I didn't love this book as much as A Song for Arbonne, or even Tigana, but I'm hoping that by the time I read the second book, I'll rank the whole sequence right up there. We'll just have to see.
10915 Sandra, I covered that here in my intro post:

http://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/3...

To sum it up: yes, we can assume people have read the book except for the posts marked for no spoilers. But on the flip side, we aren't assuming anyone has read LoE.
10915 That's why I'm like I am! I'm a Libra too.
10915 Great quote, Ellen. I was also struck by that one. That's exactly what I always wanted to say to fanatic relgious zealots.
Aug 04, 2010 07:13PM

10915 I just realized that we haven't started a thread for this yet.

On the first day of the month, I finished my first reading experience with L.E. Modesitt Jr., that being The Magic of Recluce. My review: http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/...

Now I'm just about to finish "The Library Policeman", which is the third novella in Stephen King's Four Past Midnight. It's a re-read, but it's very fresh as it's been a long time.

I also just started The Winter King by Bernard Cornwell, the first in his series about Arthur. I've heard great things about Cornwell.


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