Ryan’s review of The Fountainhead > Likes and Comments

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message 1: by Beth (new)

Beth

It is said, write from experience. While Ayn Rand had her affair with Nathaniel Branden, her husband Frank O'Connor sat in a bar attempting to drown his pain.

Rape, violence, denigration of others? Lesson's from The Fountainhead, masquerading as morality.

BTW enjoyed the hell out of your post.

Beth



message 2: by Ryan (new)

Ryan I enjoyed your post a hell of a lot more than I enjoyed this book :)

-Ryan


message 3: by Brandon (new)

Brandon Ryan wrote: "I enjoyed your post a hell of a lot more than I enjoyed this book :)

-Ryan"

Agreed. I couldn't get through the whole book, about 1/3 of the way through I had to put it down.



message 4: by Kristal (new)

Kristal I'm not finished with the book yet. And I actually love that it goes against everything I believe. I love the provocative. I enjoy reading people's opinions when they puzzle me because I can't imagine agreeing. But I really enjoyed your post and see it for sure. So far, it's the perfect way to sum up the book. Thank you for mentioning the rape.


message 5: by Miss_otis (new)

Miss_otis I want to buy you a pony.


message 6: by James (new)

James Kristal wrote: "I'm not finished with the book yet. And I actually love that it goes against everything I believe. I love the provocative. I enjoy reading people's opinions when they puzzle me because I can't imag..."

I would like to point out that the rape is little (if at all) different than the relationship between Scarlet O'Hara and Rhett Butler.


Austen to Zafón I so enjoyed this review! Thank you for writing down my thoughts much better than I could have!


message 8: by Amy (new)

Amy Morrison Well put!


message 9: by Natalie (new)

Natalie No amount of synopsis reading has prepared me for the text so well as this review. I knew what you meant immediately and now feel that I can go to read the book well prepared.


message 10: by Ayesha (new)

Ayesha Your review was way better than the book. Now that I've read this I finally feel like I'm not the only odd one midst a sea of Ayn Rand admirers.


message 11: by [deleted user] (new)

If you were to create an insane cult, I would follow it with the devotion of Rand's readers.


message 12: by Pete (new)

Pete Wyeth That was the funniest thing i've read on this site! You flippin genius!


message 13: by Lindsay (new)

Lindsay Having read Atlas Shrugged, I wonder if this could be applied to ALL of her writing?


message 14: by John (new)

John Great review!


message 15: by Sarah (new)

Sarah I have rarely had my feelings summed up so perfectly. Bravo!


message 16: by S (new)

S R Dean laughed till I cried reading this - pretty much sums up exactly how I felt about reading her "literature".


message 17: by TailFeather (new)

TailFeather THANK YOU! *highfive*


message 18: by Doug (new)

Doug To bad you didn't finish it. The last third is the best


message 19: by Ryan (last edited Oct 24, 2012 07:43AM) (new)

Ryan Doug wrote: "To bad you didn't finish it. The last third is the best"

You mean the part where Paul Ryan Howard Roark blows up that housing project he designed for working families because the local government wants to add fire escapes and a day care facility to it?


message 20: by Angela (new)

Angela Haha! This is actually my favorite book ever but I totally loved this review because I take Ayn Rand with a grain of salt. It's a love hate relationship. And yes, The Fountainhead IS that asshole at the bar.. But, as it happens, that asshole at the bar is me. And, though I know I'm an asshole, though my own convictions make my own skin crawl sometimes, I would be faking it if I tried to be anything BUT that asshole. Thank you for providing me with this analogy, it totally helps me understand my complicated relationship with Objectivism and all things Rand.


message 21: by Angela (new)

Angela And if you think FOUNTAINHEAD is a long rant, try reading Atlas. I love the crazy broad but damn she loves to shove her philosophy down your throat and call it "dialogue". 30 or some pages of ONE MANS speech? Come on.


message 22: by Shashank (new)

Shashank Pedamallu ur review precisely expresses my feelings of this book


message 23: by Jessica (new)

Jessica Rodrigues Reading your review was the only redeeming part of this book. I was going to write my own review, but I think you already said it all.


message 24: by [deleted user] (new)

Ad hominem. Typical.
So angry. Typical.
Irrelevant to any discussion of the book. Typical.
People chomping at the bit to reinforce their feelings at the same irrational ferocity they claim Objectivists are (granted some are, but no less than the average Rand hater getting their information from Wikipedia and Alternet). Typical.

To those who haven't read the book. Give it a chance and come to your own conclusions. If you hate it, know why. If you love it, know why. Don't listen to people trying to influence your view of a book by attacking bullet points and incomplete sources and then attack the author by showing her humanity. I could do the same thing about any author and any book. If you hate it, be classy and explain why. Don't lower yourself to the level of cursing and shouting down people.

Your post is just another example of an angry critic trying to influence others by informal fallacies and loud words.


message 25: by PH (new)

PH I gave up on this book on page 620. I'd never done it before being so close to the end, and by the time I did it the only thing I thought was "why haven't I dropped it before?". And guess what? I simply didn't know why. There isn't a single passage in this book that I enjoyed and I totally agree with your drunk asshole analogy. This book isn't worth the paper it's been printed on.


message 26: by Ted (new)

Ted When first I read the work of Ayn Rand I hated it. The book sat on my bookshelf for a dozen years. One day I picked it up again and started reading. I couldn't put it down. Perhaps you disagree with objectivism but that doesn't mean her work contains no truths. I don't agree with all of Rand's positions but I value her work. If nothing else she remains one of the finest atheist authors. Some books need to be read in their own time to connect with. I suggest you give it a decade or so and see if your opinion changes.


message 27: by Ted (new)

Ted When first I read the work of Ayn Rand I hated it. The book sat on my bookshelf for a dozen years. One day I picked it up again and started reading. I couldn't put it down. Perhaps you disagree with objectivism but that doesn't mean her work contains no truths. I don't agree with all of Rand's positions but I value her work. If nothing else she remains one of the finest atheist authors. Some books need to be read in their own time to connect with. I suggest you give it a decade or so and see if your opinion changes.


message 28: by Alison (new)

Alison Hello Ryan, you need to be writing reviews for a living. My husband and I read this three times and I had tears streaming down my face I was laughing so hard. You are rad!


message 29: by Aletha (new)

Aletha Dunston I like the book, but I agree that a lot of it is like "the equivalent of a drunk, eloquent asshole talking to you all night at a bar."


message 30: by Omgwords (new)

Omgwords Who is Josh talking to?

Btw,

*slow claps*

*throws hat in the ring*


message 31: by Jim (new)

Jim Ted said: "Some books need to be read in their own time to connect with."

The Fountainhead has sold about 20-million copies since it's first appearance in 1943 (roughly 70-years, 3-1/2 generations). Its time is then, now, and (quite likely)the future.


message 32: by Jonathan (last edited Aug 29, 2013 06:23AM) (new)

Jonathan Buchanan A witty way to say not very much. You feel Rand uses tricks to persuade you of her misogynistic philosophy, and you don't like it.

Rand's work deals with many issues, perhaps with a few identifiable themes. To disagree with all her ideas because you disagree with one of them shows an inability to deal with subtlety and contradiction. You choose instead to have two boxes: one for authors you like, one for authors you don't. You throw Rand's book into the "don't like" box because of the ideas you disagree with. Others can read it to take from it what they can, and discard the rest.

I imagine life is easier for a person who sees everything as a binary choice. Yet there's more to be gained from learning to deal with shades of grey.


message 33: by Lena (new)

Lena Now I HAVE TO read this book.


message 34: by Matt (new)

Matt Well said Jonathan Buchanan!


message 35: by Hella (new)

Hella Reading This book right now and I agree with you! Just one word: Boooooring!! But I'm still not ready to quit... I hope it's going to be better (but I doubt it).


message 36: by Jim (new)

Jim If you are 50-100 pages in and you are still bored - you may as well stop. The style does not change. Roark remains true to his muse (himself) and Keating slips him work in secret.


message 37: by Hella (new)

Hella I suppose I would have to stop reading... You're right and I have a lot of more interesting books to read. But the person who've suggested me this reading is a good taste person, so... But I have to deal with the idea that maybe this is not the book for me. And I must admit, Roark is so annoying and Keating is an asshole. I hate to stop reading a book without finishing it... But Life is short and there is not time for bad books :)


message 38: by Ryan (new)

Ryan Did you even read this book? Your analogy is total B.S. I have never written a comment on here before, but after reading your hogwash I must. Admitted ly, the novel started out a bit slow, but gained depth and purpose as it went along. It has been awhile since I have read a novel that had such enigmatic, strong, twisted characters. You could have hour long discussions on each of these characters structure. I would write more but I just don't care that much. I thought it was a very good book.


message 39: by Anna (new)

Anna Carnes While I disagree with Ayn's theory the book is a great piece of literature. Just because you don't agree with the stance of the author of what you are reading doesn't mean you have to hate the literature itself. Without exposure to new ideas, we don't progress. Progress is necessary to survival.


message 40: by curtis (new)

curtis the only reason it's "a great piece of literature" Anna is because so many people have been duped into reading it. it's a cornerstone of popular culture through sheer inertia.


message 41: by Jim (last edited Sep 11, 2014 10:16AM) (new)

Jim Curtis,

Part of seeing the world clearly is to avoid generalizing one's own feelings about and experience with a popular novel to the public-at-large.

That popularity is what has caused over 100-million to pick up (collectively) The Fountainhead and Atlas Shrugged. The novels themselves are what cause many of them to read them in whole.

By design, Rand forces people to "pick sides" - the collectively minded are often repelled.


message 42: by Bruce (new)

Bruce I don't wish to be the symbol of anything. I'm only myself. -Howard Roark


message 43: by Alison (new)

Alison God bless this review. I can't stop laughing because it's all so true


message 44: by Ren (new)

Ren Man, I enjoyed this review.


message 45: by Reyna (new)

Reyna Ronald Great review. Perfectly articulated.


message 46: by sologdin (new)

sologdin she absolutely objects to buying you a drink on philosophical grounds, you looter!

am thinking you give her too much credit in believing her for even a second, however.


message 47: by Shloka (new)

Shloka Badkar what was so shitty about the book? you're comparing this great work of Ayn Rand to a drunkard sitting at a bar??? are you mental?
what is it that offended you so much? the selfishness? Didn't Roark's speech in the trial make any sense to you? are you so offended because you're on the side of the parasites? who feed on the creator's work and try to destroy him? selfishness is a virtue. and ayn rand has very beautifully written about it.
as Roark said, "A selfless person does not think, feel, judge or act. these are functions of the self."
:)


message 48: by Jiji (new)

Jiji Oh I love how you put it. This is the 2nd time I am reading The Fountainhead, and it is just disturbing on so many levels.


message 49: by Sue (new)

Sue Thank you! You have captured how I feel about this piece of 'literature'.

Although it has given me an insight to the American way of thinking which makes me feel tainted and queasy. No wonder the place is in such a mess if this is the sort of thinking in the culture.


message 50: by Alex (new)

Alex Palmer Giving a book a low rating because you disagree with its message is a scummy thing to do.


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