Linda’s review of The Kite Runner > Likes and Comments

267 likes · like
Comments (showing 1-50 of 54) (54 new)    post a comment »

message 1: by Mike (new)

Mike Not sure we're supposed to like Amir. At least I didn't. I pitied him, as I pity most pathetic characters, but I thought Hosseini did a good job of painting him as the problem.

With regard to his fight with Assef, I thought that was the most important moment of the book. It was as if Hassan was leading Amir to his penance, because he knew Amir would never have been able to let go of his guilt until he felt as though he had suffered for his sins.

That's just my perspective, I appreciate yours. I love that books can promote such different reactions in people.




message 2: by Naeem (new)

Naeem Very nicely done. I find it hard to believe that I did not pick up on the themes you highlight. Manipulation is Hosseini's game. I thought it came much later. But I think you are correct that it comes early on. I also very much appreciate that you point out his paternalism.


message 3: by Linda (last edited Mar 01, 2008 10:01PM) (new)

Linda Mike and Naeem, thanks for your comments.

I have to say, I did consider for a long time that perhaps we're actually not supposed to like Amir. Certainly authors often use "unreliable narrators" to bring their point across.

However, the more I thought about it, and keeping in mind the other points I mentioned, regarding what Naeem elegantly and correctly sums up as the paternalism in the novel, I'm still not convinced that's the case here. In any event, on a personal level, I am much less interested in Amir's guilt than in Hassan's actual, terrible, and repeated suffering.

Thanks again for your comments. This is one novel that definitely stayed on my mind for a long time after reading it, and even now can still get me turning things over in my head.


message 4: by Kira (new)

Kira What a thoughtful, well-written review. It puts into words all the mixed feelings I had about the novel. I'd really been trying to think I liked it, mostly because my friends who have read it think it's great, but also because I did feel after reading it that I knew more about the situation in Afghanistan than I did before I read it. But ultimately, I have to agree with everything you said. The word "manipulative" had definitely entered my mind.

Characters like Amir, who hurt others and make almost unforgivable mistakes, can be compelling if they're handled the right way. I just don't think Hosseini handled Amir the right way, implying that he should be sympathetic even as he sits back watching the horrible things that he caused play out. I felt like I wasn't allowed to be repulsed by that. He could have ended up being sympathetic if the reader first felt permitted to hate him. He should have had to earn back our respect.

Another thing (spoiler, if anyone cares): During the molestation scene, I was very conscious that I was reading a book. I didn't believe the dialogue or the way it played out. It all seemed too neat and scripted, and I doubt that anything that horrible is neat and scripted in real life.

At any rate, I didn't mean to get into all this. All I meant to say was: great review, and I agree with you!


message 5: by Judy (last edited Apr 01, 2008 03:00PM) (new)

Judy Your observations were dead on, in my opinion. I felt similarly directly after reading the book. I changed my mind a little later on. I think that as an unreliable narrator, Hosseini wanted us to see that Amir was living in the fire of his guilt over things he did as a child. The child's poor judgment and character flaws became the man's self-imposed life sentence. Still, if Hosseini meant for Amir to seem wrong in his harsh self-perception, he could have made this more clear. I still have really mixed feelings concerning this book. I guess all writers must manipulate situations to suit their intent, but this story felt overly manipulative.

His Afghanistan was living, breathing--real. The best thing I took from the book was a snapshot of the mix of cultures and some (subjective) history of that land.


message 6: by Jude (new)

Jude Have you read his other book A Thousand Splendid Suns? (I sincerely appreciated your thougtful, even-handed review, BTW, which is why I am so curious to hear your reactions to the other.) I guess, in the end, we have to credit Kite Runner as a postiive contrubtion to literature, simply because it is stimulating so much discussion/controvversy/debate. I mean, consider Lolita: that book disgusts me, but there is no denying its brillance or its place in the American lexicon. Hats off to you for articulating so clearly all the conflict this book generates.


message 7: by Becky (new)

Becky Linda. .you hit it right on. I agree completely with you!


message 8: by N. (new)

N. I also didn't quite understand the hype toward this book. I felt uncomfortable by the politics in the book and felt like it was a simple depiction of life when life is generally so complicated. There are so many more better books out there being written. This is not one of them.


message 9: by qurat (new)

qurat Thank you so much for verbalizing what I have been thinking for months... I didn't get the hype- but then I realized that many ppl falsely believe this is an accurate insight into Afghanistan, a place so many ppl want to now understand.

There were some culturally interesting and informative passages, but this was not a good book; it was disturbing and meaninglessly so. The trauma of the US/USSR and post 9-11 confilct has not been done justice, the stories of the characters is too fanciful too many times, and the writing came across as a workshop piece.

I know there is a dearth of authentic Afghani voices in fiction, but that is going to change in the coming decade and Khaled Hosseini's first attempt has opened the door to better things.


message 10: by qurat (new)

qurat Thank you so much for verbalizing what I have been thinking for months... I didn't get the hype- but then I realized that many ppl falsely believe this is an accurate insight into Afghanistan, a place so many ppl want to now understand.

There were some culturally interesting and informative passages, but this was not a good book; it was disturbing and meaninglessly so. The trauma of the US/USSR and post 9-11 confilct has not been done justice, the stories of the characters is too fanciful too many times, and the writing came across as a workshop piece.

I know there is a dearth of authentic Afghani voices in fiction, but that is going to change in the coming decade and Khaled Hosseini's first attempt has opened the door to better things.


message 11: by Rachel (new)

Rachel I don't think we were supposed to feel sorry for main charachter/author or the priveleged class at all - he fully admits that many of the things he did were completely inexcusable, but he just says that he suffered too. And I considered it a strength of the book that the characters were so flawed and complex. It would have been a lot more "manipulative" if the author had sugar-coated the sotry. And even if some of the servant characters seemed subservient or brainwashed, that is the reader's own perspective as someone raised in an entirely different time and different culture. And yes the author may have benefited from his privelege, and experienced the uneasy guilt that comes along with that, but that's only human. I considered the author's honesty about his flaws ot be a strength, not a shortcoming, of the book.


message 12: by Rachel (new)

Rachel I don't think we were supposed to feel sorry for main charachter/author or the priveleged class at all - he fully admits that many of the things he did were completely inexcusable, but he just says that he suffered too. And I considered it a strength of the book that the characters were so flawed and complex. It would have been a lot more "manipulative" if the author had sugar-coated the sotry. And even if some of the servant characters seemed subservient or brainwashed, that is the reader's own perspective as someone raised in an entirely different time and different culture. And yes the author may have benefited from his privelege, and experienced the uneasy guilt that comes along with that, but that's only human. I considered the author's honesty about his flaws ot be a strength, not a shortcoming, of the book.


message 13: by Rachel (new)

Rachel I don't think we were supposed to feel sorry for main charachter/author or the priveleged class at all - he fully admits that many of the things he did were completely inexcusable, but he just says that he suffered too. And I considered it a strength of the book that the characters were so flawed and complex. It would have been a lot more "manipulative" if the author had sugar-coated the sotry. And even if some of the servant characters seemed subservient or brainwashed, that is the reader's own perspective as someone raised in an entirely different time and different culture. And yes the author may have benefited from his privelege, and experienced the uneasy guilt that comes along with that, but that's only human. I considered the author's honesty about his flaws ot be a strength, not a shortcoming, of the book.


message 14: by Madeleine (new)

Madeleine It's nice to read that other readers had a problem with this book. Initially it was interesting because of the setting. But it is not well written. The irony is that the main character is learning to be an author. He comments on the use of cliches, but uses them anyway. One of the chapters ends with a foreshadowing that is a groaner. The plot crosses the line into the preposterous. The evil character is a Taliban and a Nazi, maybe because being a Taliban just wasn't bad enough. I wish I had not read the book at all. What a waste of my money and valuable time.


message 15: by Mitch (new)

Mitch "I considered the author's honesty about his flaws to be a strength, not a shortcoming, of the book."

I agree with you Rachel.
I thought it was refreshing to read a book with such a despicable narrator. I didn't like Amir, but I liked that. Many of my classmates shared the negative and positive opinions that people have expressed here. I think Hosseini did an amazing job with this book, especially with his frequent allusions to the characters' eyes. My review for The Kite Runner would probably be a 4, but I share many of the expressed opinions about Amir. I've never felt so much frustration towards a main character as I did with him. But, I still loved this book, and I love reading some of these well-written, articulate, opposite opinions of it.


message 16: by Rachel (new)

Rachel Yes, ironically I thought it was courageous of the author to admit to being so cowardly.


message 17: by Tony (new)

Tony duncan I actually was very sympathetic toward Amir from the beginning. The author had Amir, from the beginning, wrestle with his behavior and the spiritual and real practical cost of his selfishness. He was aware of his failings and aware of his hiding and rationalization of his failings. the whole book is an excercise in consequences. And it follows form the idea of the sins of the fathers being visited on the sons.

I don;t know about you but I have done stupid, selfish and bad things in my life. Some small and some that had serious consequences and I think of myself as a good person, who is quite sympathetic. I have grown and changed my behavior, and to me that is what is important. Amir really learned about compassion and took responsibility for as much as he was capable of. there were a couple of times were i cried for him. As i cried for Hassan and his almost saintly lack of judgement against his childhood friend.I in no way thought that Hosseini diminished the role that hassan played in the book. it was always there and his spirit is a major part of what allowed Amir to become a better person.








message 18: by Warun (new)

Warun I've heard that this book was really good it sounds really interesting from your summary I think I might read it some day.


message 19: by Neil (new)

Neil I'm not sure why people feel that they've been 'manipulated' by this novelist more than any other. That's what writers tend to do.

As for feeling that as readers we're 'supposed' to feel sympathy for a particular character; just read it and make your own mind up, a bit like you would do in real life when meeting another flawed human.


message 20: by Rachel (new)

Rachel I agree - I really don't understand why people thought we were supposed to feel sorry for the author. He expresses great shame and regret about the mistakes he made, and I didn't feel there was any self-pity. He was just an ordinary man who made a lot of mistakes and tried to make ammends the best he knew how.


message 21: by Judy (new)

Judy I think people were more annoyed that they invested time in reading a character who inspired such unpleasant emotions in them. At least, I can speak for myself in saying that.

It's one thing for a character to make mistakes--they should. Still, everyone has a line beyond which they feel the person's actions make them utterly repulsive. That's how I felt when I first read the book. It made for an unpleasant experience.


message 22: by Neil (new)

Neil This is a purely personal opinion I know, but I read books to appreciate a good story, well written. The fact that some characters might seem thoroughly unpleasant, even morally repugnant to me is irrelevant.
The story of someone trying to redeem himself for his appalling childhood behaviour, I find quite compelling.

As Rachel said; an ordinary man trying to make amends for his mistakes, it's not a new story, but one I thought was told better than most.


message 23: by Linda (last edited Oct 04, 2008 02:34PM) (new)

Linda There have been many comments to my review since I first wrote it, and I thought it might be about time for me to weigh in for a moment.

Before I get into my response, I must start off with a great thank you for all those who have felt sufficiently moved (positively or negatively) by my review to comment and respond. I appreciate all the comments, whether I agree with them or not.

First of all, I'd like to address the question of whether we're "supposed" to like Amir or not. Yes, I do realize that sometimes writers create and/or focus on a character that the reader is not meant to like. Here, though, the story is clearly meant to be about some kind of redemption -- but I found Amir so distasteful, that I simply wasn't interested in his redemption. The focus of the story was entirely on how Amir's life had been corrupted by the despicable things he'd done - when the things he'd done were entirely part and parcel of the position of power and privilege he occupied over Hassan.

Which brings me to my second point, the insufferable current of paternalism that runs throughout the story. The members of the servant and poorer classes are consistently portrayed as saintly, absurdly self-sacrificing, one-dimensional characters. Regardless of what terrible things befall them, they are shown to have nothing but their masters' interests at heart. Granted, it may be unlikely that the powerless would be overtly talking back and setting their masters straight; however, the novel gives no indication that they even have any private wishes of recrimination, or much of a private life, for that matter. Given this portrayal, it is even more difficult for me to muster any interest in Amir's suffering. But to suggest that perhaps we're misinterpreting the servants' subservient attitudes because we approach the story from a different time, place, or culture, is simply to engage in a cultural relativism borne out of -- and perpetuating -- the very same paternalism.

To clarify my point, let's look at some comparable examples from US culture. Consider any one of a huge number of films such as Driving Miss Daisy, Clara's Heart, Bagger Vance, or Ghost (all simply continuing a tradition that reaches back to Shirley Temple's days) in which noble servants or similar helpers have absolutely no concern in their lives other than making sure the wealthy people they are serving have happy, fulfilled lives -- while they themselves never seem to have any of their own personal hopes, desires, triumphs, tragedies, or even any hint of a home, family, personal, or romantic life at all. Their total happiness is bound up entirely with serving the lives of their rich counterparts. It is this quality, present throughout Hosseini's book, that bothers me most.

In the end, however, a beautifully written story could have overcome these criticisms -- or at the very least, I would have been able to temper or counter my points above with lavish praise for the writing. However, here, again, the novel falls flat. It is not particularly well-written. As some other commenters have also pointed out, the storytelling is quite heavy-handed, and the narrative suffers from implausible plot twists and uncanny coincidences, and a writing style that relies far too heavily on cliches and obvious literary devices.

I wish that I could say I liked the book more. To answer Jude's question above, I haven't read A Thousand Splendid Suns; I'm afraid I wasn't particularly motivated to do so after my reaction to this one. However, I do believe, as Jude also suggests, that there is something to be gained from the debate and discussion that the book has inspired.





message 24: by Nick (new)

Nick Having put weeks of research into this book for term paper study I can say with 100% confidence that you have missed the point of this novel. You are oversimplifying the novel. I will agree that Hossieni did "hit" us a little hard with some of the metaphors but other then that I do not agree with you at all. This story was about the human condition of Amir, if, in the end, you end up detesting Amir than you have truly missed the point of this novel and you have failed to observe his plight in an objective manner. You by no means have to love Amir for what he's done, but the only way you could possibly loathe him is simply if you misunderstood the novel.


message 25: by Brandon (new)

Brandon Actually, that quote about every woman needing a husband makes me shake my head. The author is trying to be poignant and missing the mark entirely.

Not every woman needs a husband.


message 26: by Ben (new)

Ben You commented:
...the author's attempts at metaphor, allegory, and forshadowing are utterly ham-fisted. When he wants to make a point, he hits you over the head with it, hard -- Amir's split lip / Hassan's cleft palate comes immediately, resoundingly to mind.


I had this exact same reaction when i read the Kite Runner. I felt like Hosseini was treating us like children – beating us over the head with the symmetry in Amir's penance to be sure we got the point.

But when i mentioned this to my wife she reminded me that those were Amir's thoughts. That the author was conveying Amir's growing sense that he was paying for the wrongs of his childhood. Amir was coming to believe that his wrongs could be made right and that he and Sohrab could fill the voids in each others' lives.

And that's what made Sohrab's withdrawal so poignant. Amir's redemption wasn't Sohrab's redemption. Sohrab had his own demons and it was now Amir's turn to love him in spite of the guilt and shame Sohrab carried inside. That was Amir's true redemption. (And Hosseini didn't hit us over the head with that point.)


message 27: by Anjani (new)

Anjani Kumar Jude wrote: "Have you read his other book A Thousand Splendid Suns? (I sincerely appreciated your thougtful, even-handed review, BTW, which is why I am so curious to hear your reactions to the other.) I guess, ..." I agree with Jude. This story give a new perspective to child Psychology


message 28: by Miki (new)

Miki I think that the flaws in Amir's character is what makes him a dynamic character and what makes the story interesting. If every character un every book were perfect in character it wouldn't be interesting. The flaws in each character is what makes them feel real and interesting. I think that Hossein did a great job.


message 29: by Harley (new)

Harley Rose I agree with 711miki! =]


message 30: by Tiyrna (new)

Tiyrna Nightschild I don't think I like what happened in the book, nor Amir as a character, to tell the truth. But the events in this book portrayed the human weakness and ugliness, as well as love and hope and forgiveness, all in the same person, and exactly as it was. Humans sometimes are ugly, sometimes beautiful; sometimes pure, and sometimes cowardly. The book portrays all of that as human nature, and I think that there is much truth in what the book says.

The story itself contained a quality of fairness in it, sort of like: what goes around comes around? That made me satisfied. I know that Amir could never really repent for his mistakes for taking that beating and caring for the son, but he is moving on, trying to live out his life the best that he can from now on, and I think this holds truth to how human beings really are.

At the ending, I felt that this story was bittersweet, but an accurate portrayal of life, of how it goes on, regardless of what horrible mistakes, crimes, or regrets that you made. Life itself doesn't judge; it will continue to offer new chances and nope for those that live.


message 31: by Jon (new)

Jon C How can you be so moved by a book and give it 1*. If it makes you feel anything then surely it hit the spot. You seem to have understood it and yet 1*? I don't get you!


message 32: by Linda (new)

Linda @Jon C: Well, the short answer is that I am guided by Goodread's prompts when I rate a book. Two stars is "It was OK;" 1 star is "I didn't like it." While I have praised a few things about the book, the bottom line is, overall, I didn't like it.


message 33: by Brenda (new)

Brenda I am wondering if anyone who took liberal swings at the "writing style" has published anything in their second language? It would be fun to critique that for sure.


message 34: by Becomingme (new)

Becomingme I really LIKE your review, I think it states what I felt regarding the book and why it took me so long to finish it. I HATED Amir, and hated the fact that the book seemed to try a garnish pity and admiration for him(Armir)...Again I think you for eloquently saying what I could not. And that quote about the women, I saw that and I too thought they were thrown in there not as "bad" things, but as a sign of what was "good" and what "should" be, and THAT makes me want to hurl...


message 35: by Manasi (new)

Manasi Ok...I've never liked Amir, but I still love this book. To me, it doesn't seem as if we're supposed to admire him or pity him. I feel like this book is trying to say that actions have consequences. It's showing the life of a man after having done wrong deeds. You don't pity him just because it talks about how bad he is feeling. In fact, throughout the whole book, I was thinking about Hassan. Also, to your point about the servant class, I don't think the book is necessarily saying that servants are the happiest when they are serving their masters. It was just showing the qualities of Hassan. Hassan would do anything for Amir, because he thought of him as a friend. This characteristic showed his goodness, which later in the books, affected Amir because Hassan was everything he wasn't.By the way, please feel free to reply. I am very interested in people's opinions about this comment.


message 36: by Lori (new)

Lori I really appreciated reading your well written review of this book. You expressed my sentiments of how I felt while reading this book and after. I had a difficult time even finishing this book because I found Amir so unlikeable and cowardice. Thanks for your honest review!


message 37: by Lola (new)

Lola I read to be affected in some way... For better or worse I want to feel something. I despised Amir at times and pitied him at others. The bottom line is that the story did what any good book should do...move the reader to experience emotion, provoke thought, and teach us something about ourselves along the way. I loved experiencing this story, no matter how uncomfortable it was at times.


message 38: by Amber (new)

Amber Avanossian If you ever have the pleasure of getting to know or love someone from this region of the world... The book becomes alive with meaningful metaphors, historical accuracy, & life lessons that are shocking to most of us who cannot comprehend what immigrants from this region have survived. Their struggle and triumph is so inspiring.

If someone couldn't wrap their mind around this book, I think that they really can't fathom this story as a possible truth. I read certain chapters to my husband and he wept. He grew up in Iran and his story isn't the same, but he remembered the struggle.

Life is soooooo much harder for them - than we as US citizens can ever comprehend. Their stories are complex, sad, triumphant, & wrought with difficulties. Read it again from a compassionate perspective if you don't enjoy it the first time.

It seems far fetched, but it's not.... :(


message 39: by Bird (new)

Bird Great review, and beautifully written.
My feelings after reading this book mirror yours almost exactly!


message 40: by Marcia (new)

Marcia I respect your point of view, but I would like to point out a couple of things.

First, regarding the author's failure to go into more detail about the servants and the lower class in general. I see your point, and while showing both sides is sometimes necessary and can make the story more well-rounded, in this case, it wasn't about them. It is not always practical or beneficial to tell both sides. This is not a trial, in which both sides must be represented equally, it is a story about the difficulties of life in that place and time, even for the rich. That is not to say you should feel like you have to like the main character or feel sorry for him. I have read many books in which I hated the main character, but still thought it was a story worth reading, and enjoyable.

The thing that I took from this story was not sympathy for the poor little rich boy who felt badly after being so cruel. It was that things are tough all over. The grass isn't always greener on the other side. In our society people think that they have it rough and if they had more money their problems would be over. The Kite Runner illustrates the point that in Afghanistan, even the rich suffer. Though the problems may be different ones, they are still very real and can not be dismissed as a person whining about the little things, when they don't know what real suffering is. Poverty and servitude are not the only serious problems a person can have. Yes, it is very in-your-face at times, but I think that is more of an asset to this book than a liability. The conditions in Afghanistan are severe, and the author drives that point home very effectively.

Not trying to convince you, just wanted to offer another angle.


message 41: by Karen (new)

Karen I basically agree with you. I did get wrapped up in the story, but the ending was so pat that it really irritated me! There was a lack of authenticity in the characters that i couldn't ignore. I felt that Amir never did really get it. He wasn't even being honest with his audience. Still hiding, trying too hard to be sympathetic.

I did read a A Thousand Splendid Suns, however, and liked it MUCH better. I really liked it a lot, in fact.


message 42: by Jayson (new)

Jayson Dela pena Thank God someone out there has the same opinion as me, I talk to my friends about these books and I can't. All of my friends don't read books, and if they do it's Harry Potter, and all that stuff that doesn't appeal to me. They will never read classics and I don't expect them to, but it's just sad that you read so much books but you can't discuss it with other people.

Anyways to the story, I 100% agree with you about hating the protagonist, never in my life I had not hated a protagonist as much as I hated this guy, he was saying "I did so many bad things to this other character but look what it did to me! I'm a victim! Don't forgive me or forgive me I don't care because I have to live with this for the rest of my life!" it made me laugh, because it was trying to force feed me that I was suppose to feel sympathetic for him. He had a nice life, what did the servant get and his son also?

Anyways I was in high school when I read this, and to be honest then I didn't care what I read so I can't really remember if this was well written or not, but one thing is that I can never forgive this guy for doing what he did to someone that loved him dearly.


message 43: by Sanjid (new)

Sanjid Halim Brandon wrote: "Actually, that quote about every woman needing a husband makes me shake my head. The author is trying to be poignant and missing the mark entirely.

Not every woman needs a husband."


I think the author was merely trying to project the ideas of people in Afghanistan through this quote which makes perfect sense given how patriarchal the community is.


message 44: by Alan (new)

Alan Sheinwald I was deeply challenged by this review, which seemed quite accurate.


message 45: by Jessica (new)

Jessica Goates Loved your review! It was exactly how I felt and you said it so much better then I could have!


message 46: by Milani (new)

Milani Amir is a flawed human being, but at least he is honest. He aspires to cowardice as he says. He feels dwarfed by his own father and not worthy of his love. He feels guilt over having "killed" his mother because she died while giving birth to her. Amir is only a child competing for his father's love and attention. He is fully submerged in his Afghan culture which tells him that he must think of the Hazara as vermin not as his equals. You failed to see how Amir struggles! Hassan is so good and so "pure" as Amir says, that he makes him feel such great self loathing. I almost feel the opposite of you. How could Hassan be so good and so loyal to Amir? I asked myself how could he not rebel against Hassan and the whole damn Afghan culture? How could he be so good? Amir I can understand, but Hassan is a character who is almost too good that I couldn't relate to him at all. I think the novel is a masterpiece and must really disagree with your point of view. You attempt to take the character of Amir out of the setting in which he was raised and you forget his great struggles.


message 47: by Adam (new)

Adam Gottbetter I must disagree with you. This is a good book. The author is one of my favorite and would recommend all his books. - Adam Gottbetter


message 48: by Candace (last edited Mar 21, 2014 10:33AM) (new)

Candace Ross With regards to feeling any sympathy toward the narrator, I honestly didn't to much of a degree. I continued to find myself sad for those he affected and hurt deeply. I think I even felt sad for myself because I began to connect mostly with Hassan. I personally get angry at the narrator because he is just so damn selfish and self-righteous. It's obvious to see why his father was so disappointed in him and it took him too long to realize it for himself.


message 49: by Rprathin (new)

Rprathin The book was ariiiii ,


message 50: by Linda (last edited Apr 20, 2014 06:21PM) (new)

Linda Amber wrote: "If you ever have the pleasure of getting to know or love someone from this region of the world... [ . . . . ] If someone couldn't wrap their mind around this book, I think that they really can't fathom this story as a possible truth. [ . . . . ] Life is soooooo much harder for them - than we as US citizens can ever comprehend."

It's been a while since I looked at comments to my review, but I must have read past this one at some point, because I'm just noticing it now, and I felt moved to respond. While I surely don't expect everyone to agree with my assessment of the book, and I am very glad to engage in debate with others about its merits, the response quoted appears to be based primarily on some seriously broad assumptions about myself and my personal history. I shouldn't have to explain my personal background in order to justify my interpretation of a book. Moreover, it seems the commenter may need reminding that Goodreads is a *world-wide* community of readers, and not everyone on this site is "we as US citizens". Some of us have even managed to have had "the pleasure of getting to know or love someone from this region of the world", have seen and experienced many things beyond the typical US experience that perhaps may be difficult to "fathom as . . . a possible truth", and are yet capable of disliking this book without being deficient in compassion.

I hate to be snippy, but. . . whoa.


« previous 1
back to top