Cecily’s review of Lord of the Flies > Likes and Comments

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message 1: by Hannah (new)

Hannah Finch I've never read this. I'll pick up a copy tomorrow so I can join in.


message 2: by Andy (new)

Andy This is another one that kinda slipped away in the stream of time. Thanks for the review; now I'm going to have to go find it and re-read it. :-)


message 3: by Suzanne (new)

Suzanne I've read Lord of the Flies and taught several times. I read the first of The Hunger Games. Personally I prefer the former. They both do contain the same themes, but I found Lord of the Flies richer because of the language. I'm sure kids would prefer The Hunger Games because the simpler language and the frequency of violence.


message 4: by Cecily (new)

Cecily Suzanne wrote: "I found Lord of the Flies richer because of the language."
Yep - and the symbolism.


Suzanne wrote: "I'm sure kids would prefer The Hunger Games because the simpler language and the frequency of violence."
It's also easier to draw parallels with the modern world (not necessarily better, but easier).


message 5: by Suzanne (new)

Suzanne Luckily for the future generations, I'm retired. I was never known for taking the easier roads. They always said that I took literature and my job too seriously.


message 6: by Cecily (new)

Cecily Unluckily for future generations, by the sound of it. :(
Taking literature too seriously?! What a sad and awful thing for someone to say.


message 7: by Suzanne (new)

Suzanne Most of what 15-18 years olds say, especially to their English teachers, is pretty sad and awful. Listen to the lyrics of their music. They grow up, or at least some do.
I've met a few, 10 years later who have fond memories of books and their false bravado. Maybe in reverse order.(-:


message 8: by Cecily (last edited Sep 15, 2013 03:28PM) (new)

Cecily Joanb wrote: "The book is not dated, actually, it's written for a certain time period. It's like saying "The French Lieutenant's Woman" is dated."

I don't quite agree. The French Lieutenant's Woman is a period piece, too distant from our current time for direct comparison with it, whereas Lord of the Flies is recognisably modern in some ways (aeroplanes, for instance) and although it has something to tell us today (e.g. about power), other aspects can be distracting or make it less appealing to the youth of today (eg the assumption the British boys should be jolly good chaps - “we’re not savages, we’re English”).


message 9: by Cecily (new)

Cecily :)


message 10: by Alaa (new)

Alaa I was surprised in finding out that even the characters symbolized something; voilence, intellect, justice...and that's why some got along and other didn't. The notion of 'the beast' brought me to think of our own society's beast. Is he made up too? Needless to say I'm not scared of the beast anymore =)


message 11: by Cecily (new)

Cecily Alaa wrote: " The notion of 'the beast' brought me to think of our own society's beast. Is he made up too? Needless to say I'm not scared of the beast anymore =) "

Whether or not the Beast is made up perhaps depends on whether you think the devil is made up. And there are plenty of adults who are scared of him!


message 12: by Alaa (new)

Alaa Hahahah yes indeed, and as I've figured out, the 'beast' is within us. It's very nicely potrayed in the lord of the flies


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