Kemper’s review of Catching Fire (The Hunger Games, #2) > Likes and Comments

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message 1: by Trudi (new)

Trudi I'll be very interested to see what you make of Mockingjay Kemper. Reactions are definitely split. I'm going to re-read this trilogy at some point, away from the initial gush, and assess them with a more critical eye. I gave five stars to both HG and CF (a little too much fangirling going on there I think).

Although, I did love Hangover II. Maybe I'm just easy ;)


message 2: by Kemper (new)

Kemper Trudi wrote: "I'll be very interested to see what you make of Mockingjay Kemper. Reactions are definitely split. I'm going to re-read this trilogy at some point, away from the initial gush, and assess them with ..."

The ending of this one makes me think that Mockingjay may end up having more of what I liked.


[Name Redacted By Goodreads Because Irrelevant to Review] I disliked the first book, in part because the Government seemed so incompetent. If they'd just said that they decided to spare both kids because they were sooooo moved with compassion by their love for one another, that would have made the Government seem less incompetent and more merciful. An easier way to retain power.

That said, do you think someone who didn't enjoy the first book would enjoy this second one more?


message 4: by Stephanie (new)

Stephanie (“It’s the same story as before, but this time it’s in Thailand!!”)

Ha! I agree with your review....that is all


message 5: by Kemper (new)

Kemper Ian wrote: "I disliked the first book, in part because the Government seemed so incompetent. If they'd just said that they decided to spare both kids because they were sooooo moved with compassion by their lov..."

I'd guess if you didn't like the first one, this one wouldn't change your mind. The whole thing about the government seeming incompetent is worse in this one because it's supposed to be powerful enough to deploy brutal force in all the districts, yet fragile enough that it can be undone by a 17 year old girl who really isn't even trying to fight them.

This is one of those that you have to just go with a kind of outlandish concept to enjoy. If you didn't buy it in in #1, I doubt you will in #2.


message 6: by Kemper (new)

Kemper Stephanie wrote: "(“It’s the same story as before, but this time it’s in Thailand!!”)

Ha! I agree with your review....that is all"


It's because it had a monkey in it.


message 7: by Trudi (new)

Trudi Look at him in his little jacket...look at that face




message 8: by Stephanie (new)

Stephanie Kemper wrote: "Stephanie wrote: "(“It’s the same story as before, but this time it’s in Thailand!!”)

Ha! I agree with your review....that is all"

It's because it had a monkey in it."


Yuuup!


message 9: by Ronyell (new)

Ronyell Awesome review Kemper! I really like the political message in this book!


message 10: by Kemper (new)

Kemper Ronyell wrote: "Awesome review Kemper! I really like the political message in this book!"

Thanks!


message 11: by Kemper (new)

Kemper Trudi wrote: "Look at him in his little jacket...look at that face

"


Ugh....


message 12: by Amanda (new)

Amanda I completely agree. The problem with Catching Fire was that the reader expected more of the same and it would have been great if Collins had decided to shake up that expectation by giving us something completely different.

I liked Mockingjay much better than Catching Fire. It has a complexity of character that I thought was very realistic given everything Katniss has been through and Collins took some chances in how she chose to end the series. There's no cookie cutter ending here, as is the case with so many young adult books.


message 13: by Trudi (new)

Trudi Kemper wrote: "Ugh...."

No, ugh is the little brown bat I nearly stepped on leaving work yesterday. It was right outside the doors squealing a godawful piercing screech to be let into the library. I nearly lost my shit. Who knew bats liked to read so much? My boyfriend figures it was rabid 'cause they're not supposed to act like that during the day.




message 14: by Kemper (new)

Kemper Amanda wrote: "I completely agree. The problem with Catching Fire was that the reader expected more of the same and it would have been great if Collins had decided to shake up that expectation by giving us somet..."

I'm very glad to hear that. I was really getting into this through the first half until it reverted to the arena stuff again so the more Mockingjay shakes things up, the more I think I'll like it.


message 15: by Kemper (new)

Kemper Trudi wrote: "Kemper wrote: "Ugh...."

No, ugh is the little brown bat I nearly stepped on leaving work yesterday. It was right outside the doors squealing a godawful piercing screech to be let into the library...."


Yeah, but then again, a rabid bat didn't star in Space Chimps either...


message 16: by Sesana (new)

Sesana Ian wrote: "I disliked the first book, in part because the Government seemed so incompetent. If they'd just said that they decided to spare both kids because they were sooooo moved with compassion by their lov..."

I had that issue, too, even more so with Catching Fire. But this is a government that has dealt with every political problem in memory by using force, up to the point of nuking an entire region. They've lost the political nuances that would have let them actually handle Katniss. It all made more sense to me once I started to think about it that way.


message 17: by Ally (new)

Ally I see your point but to be fair a lot is cleared up with regards to Katniss' role as political face of the uprising in the third book. I think she had to go back into the arena to make the third book work the way it does. In my opinion it's better to view the books completely together rather than as three separate works to understand the way that Collins wanted it to hang together.


message 18: by Kemper (new)

Kemper Alice wrote: "I see your point but to be fair a lot is cleared up with regards to Katniss' role as political face of the uprising in the third book. I think she had to go back into the arena to make the third bo..."

I've read the third book and still think putting Katniss back into the arena was pretty weak. There were a lot of ways to advance the story that would have been more interesting than just hitting the reset button.


message 19: by Riona (new)

Riona Kemper wrote: "I've read the third book and still think putting Katniss back into the arena was pretty weak. There were a lot of ways to advance the story that would have been more interesting than just hitting the reset button."

Yes! Thank you.


message 20: by Elizabeth (new)

Elizabeth haha just read the first sentence. " Don’t you hate it when you accidentally start a political uprising?" and just laughed and cant stop laughing its not even that funny. I see the point it would suck, but i just dont see the likelihood and thats what makes it funny. I'm not explaining myself that good ahh can't explain sorry :D good review. :)


message 21: by Nicole (new)

Nicole Neustadt I can agree with some of the points you have made and can see where you are coming from. However, I really do enjoy the ending to the Quarter Quell. I like how Katniss and Peeta are kept in the dark about the outcome of this game because the two of them are the faces of the rebellion. I agree with how you say the later part of the book copies the plot of the first book, but Collins is able to save it by adding in the way the rebels have planned to end the games short, capture Katniss, Peeta, and a few others to help add fire to the brewing rebellion and ultimately take down the capitol. The way Katniss is able to outsmart the game makers and President Snow once again is kind of humorous especially how in the first part of the book Katniss is trying to fulfill everyone of President Snow's wishes.


message 22: by Jordon (new)

Jordon Muse I agree with you 100%. I found it ironic as well as humorous that Katniss finds herself a revolutionary leader. It is hard to believe that she is so out of the loop that she does not realize that a revolution is going on. It is harder to believe that whole movement decided to keep their symbol/spokesperson out of the loop. When she was picked again to go the games I was like “Here we go again”. I hope she becomes more involved in the next book.


message 23: by Matthew (new)

Matthew Gobin I agree, sometimes the book dissapointed me and other times I was completely ecstatic about it. I didn't like how the games ended completely but it was meant to be. My favorite part was when she used the lighting to destroy the games. The arena was also very strange but made the book an intense read.


message 24: by Claire (new)

Claire Thanks for articulating what I had kind of instinctively felt upon reading CF- I was disappointed that I was going to have to read another round of the arena. I would much rather have watched Katniss evolve into her rebel role in a more organic way. It seemed like there were so many opportunities for that, what with her on the train touring all of the Districts. Going back to another round of hunger games felt like kind of a cop-out, though to be fair I haven't read the final book yet. Perhaps it will be more satisfying...


message 25: by Kemper (new)

Kemper Claire wrote: "Thanks for articulating what I had kind of instinctively felt upon reading CF- I was disappointed that I was going to have to read another round of the arena. I would much rather have watched Katni..."

If you felt like me about those points then you probably are gonna be let down by the third one too. But hopefully you'll like it better than I did.


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