Brad’s review of The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time > Likes and Comments

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Kelly H. (Maybedog) You forgot #1. It's a prime number, too. I LOVED this book. I've read other books with autistic characters/narrators before but Christopher is such a fresh and believable character that I just kept wanting more and more. You said everything you liked about it but you only gave it a three. What didn't you like?


message 2: by Manny (new)

Manny A review in the spirit of the book!

And Kelly, 1 is not a prime. Otherwise a number couldn't be uniquely expressed as a product of primes. I'm sure Christopher would be delighted to explain the details, if you need more information :)




message 3: by jo (new)

jo lovely. these are my favorites: 2. 3. 13. 29. 43.(even though i don't understand it!) 61.!!!!! 71. 83. 89.

i disagree with 73. go oprah!


message 4: by Brad (new)

Brad Hey, Kelly. There has been lots of debate over the years about the Primality of 1, but I tend towards the exclusion of one, and since Christopher excluded 1 I thought it fitting to drop it for the review.

You know, I can't say that there was anything I didn't like, but by the time I was finished I felt like "this book is not going to stick with me." I have tried with my GoodReads rankings to always stick with the emotional response over the qualitative, so there are books that "I love" and give five stars to that would only recieve "It's okay" if I was ranking by quality. So on a quality basis I would probably give The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time four stars, but my response when I finished was a mere "I liked it."

You always inspire me with your reviews "in the spirit of the book," Manny, and since I was reading this book when I read your review of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, I thought it was a perfect opportunity to emulate your style.

I expected some folks would disagree with 73, jo (except maybe Jonathon Franzen) ;), but I am glad you liked a bunch of the rest, especially your 5 exclamation point enjoyment of 61. That had to be one of my favourite parts of the book.


message 5: by Matthieu (new)

Matthieu 1 is a strange number, absolutely.


message 6: by Manny (last edited Apr 17, 2009 02:23AM) (new)

Manny Brad, happy to hear that you were inspired by my Alice review... but I was inspired by Jessica's review of Bleak House, which I think is a masterpiece! I wonder how far back you can trace this chain :)



Kelly H. (Maybedog) I forgot he excluded one. In the old dark ages of my youth we were taught it was the prime prime number. The definition of a prime number was that it had no other factors other than itself and the number 1. 1 fits that. But you, of course, were right in following Christopher's lead.

I like your ranking system; my books are ranked similarly, hence why Catcher in the Rye only has 3 stars even though I recognize it's place in modern literature.

Oprah has single-handedly done more for literacy and reading than anyone else I can think of in this age. But of course, that always comes with a backlash and any book she chooses gets an immediate negative label along the lines of "too main stream." So I both agree and disagree with number 73.

I loved 61. I haven't been to london so 67 didn't resonate as much with me, although I feel similarly about the NY subway system. ACK!


message 8: by Ben (new)

Ben Matthew, can we start calling you Mini-Manny?


message 9: by Michelle (new)

Michelle #71: Really? You enjoyed that part?
: (


message 10: by Brad (new)

Brad Well...Wellington was a poodle, Michelle. ;)


message 11: by Brad (new)

Brad Kelly wrote: "Oprah has single-handedly done more for literacy and reading than anyone else I can think of in this age. But of course, that always comes with a backlash and any book she chooses gets an immediate negative label along the lines of "too main stream." So I both agree and disagree with number 73...."

There is that, but I think she is closely challenged by JK Rowling for influence on literacy. Potter gave one whole generation of kids a reason to buy books again too.


message 12: by Michelle (last edited Apr 17, 2009 07:32AM) (new)

Michelle Ha ha! I have to admit they're not among my favorite breeds.

P.S. I loved the way Christopher and his dad showed affection by spreading their fingers out in a fan and touching hands.


message 13: by Libby (new)

Libby Brad wrote: "Kelly wrote: "Oprah has single-handedly done more for literacy and reading than anyone else I can think of in this age. But of course, that always comes with a backlash and any book she chooses get..."

Um, I think we could probably give teachers some credit for promoting literacy and reading, don't you? Sorry, but I think Oprah simply rides the waves of others’ reviews and then stamps a big "O" on the book. In my opinion, Oprah has never really "discovered" any book. I mean wasn't Night one of "her" books - well, it seems the Nobel Peace Prize people beat her to that find.

I'm just sad at how many people apparently don't read until Oprah says so . . .



message 14: by Libby (new)

Libby Oprah aside - I found this book to be amazing. I do volunteer work with autistic children and this book actually allowed me to glimpse what life might look like to them. A consider it quite an achievement.


message 15: by Brad (new)

Brad Libby wrote: "Um, I think we could probably give teachers some credit for promoting literacy and reading, don't you? Sorry, but I think Oprah simply rides the waves of others’ reviews and then stamps a big "O" on the book...." Good points, Libby. I would also add that when I think of Oprah's contribution to literacy, I see it as more of a popularization of reading again, so that her influence is more connected to book sales than actually literacy. Teachers, and those who generate an early love of reading (like Dr. Seuss), deserve most of the credit for learning to read.

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time was a lovely achievement wasn't it? What a sensitive way to approach autism.


message 16: by Brad (new)

Brad Kelly wrote: "I like your ranking system; my books are ranked similarly, hence why Catcher in the Rye only has 3 stars even though I recognize it's place in modern literature...."

I gave Catcher in the Rye the same ranking for the same reasons, Kelly. It is a great piece of lit, and I can see why, but it just doesn't do it for me on an emotional level. I always kind of hated Holden Caulfield, possibly because my old English teacher said I was Holden, but I totally get the book's and the character's importance to literature.



Kelly H. (Maybedog) I loved that, too. I thought of using it with my special needs daughter who also hates being touched but then I realized she would think it was stupid now that she's a teenager.

Brad, I agree Potter has had a huge influence on literacy, too.


message 18: by Libby (new)

Libby Kelly wrote: "I loved that, too. I thought of using it with my special needs daughter who also hates being touched but then I realized she would think it was stupid now that she's a teenager.

Brad, I agree Pot..."


Kelly - are you familar w/ Dr. Temple Grandin? She is a highly accomplished autistic woman who has authored a number of very interesting books - especially if you are an animal lover. I enjoyed Animals in Translation Using the Mysteries of Autism to Decode Animal Behavior. I would think that her work might be of interest to a teenager.


Kelly H. (Maybedog) Actually that might be of interest. My daughter isn't autistic, just was born drug-affected and horribly neglected and abused. She has Reactive Attachment Disorder and PTSD so she just hates to be touched (except inappropriately by older boys). But she loves animals as do I so I'll look into it. Thanks!


message 20: by Brad (new)

Brad I love how messages take on a life of their own, and lead us in so many amazing directions. I suppose it is really the books themselves are to blame. I feel sad for all those people out there who don't read, or who read but internalize what they've read and never talk about the books with anyone. All those surprising connections missed.


message 21: by Libby (new)

Libby Brad wrote: "I love how messages take on a life of their own, and lead us in so many amazing directions. I suppose it is really the books themselves are to blame. I feel sad for all those people out there who d..."

Couldn't agree more - talking about the books and the topics they spark make reading even better.

I've always liked how in Harry Potter and Terry's Pratchett's Discworld books have a "life" of their own. I think it's true. All books seem to have a bit of magic of their own.



message 22: by Ubik (new)

Ubik Ive had this on my shelf now for months and keep going around it for another book, but I really like youre review. I think when Im done with In the Garden of Iden and Future Shock Ill finally make myself dig into this one.


message 23: by Brad (new)

Brad Do, Ubik. It is definitely worth the read.


Kelly H. (Maybedog) Yes, I loved it.


message 25: by Georg (new)

Georg "I feel sad for all those people out there who don't read..."
Back to our topic, Brad.
What do you think how many people "out there" feel sad for all those who don't play Bridge, go fishing, collect stamps or try to rebuild the Tour Eiffel with tooth-picks? I myself stick to books because it allows me to sit comfortable and have a drink.


message 26: by Brad (new)

Brad I can't speak for others, but I am sure sad that I don't play Bridge and that I've never built anything with tooth-picks. I had a stamp collection when I was a kid, and I love to fish, though, so two out of four ain't bad.


message 27: by Bonnie (new)

Bonnie Very clever review, Brad! And I found my way to Jessica's review of Bleak House. You BOTH deserve the votes you have received for these reviews! The Curious... has been on my "to read" for quite a long while. Just so many books piled up around me, and I am trying to write one, as well! Ah well, will get there eventually, although I see you only gave it 3 stars...

Anyway, cheers! B. :)


message 28: by Brad (new)

Brad Thanks, Bonnie. I try to make my reviews adhere to the Goodreads "didn't like it," "it was ok," "liked it," "really liked it," "loved it." It seems as good a rating system as any other, so often there are books that would get more stars if I was rating their quality rather than how I felt about it (not sure if this one would go up though, I need some time and space to see if it holds up). There are some books, especially amongst the classics, whose influence and excellence deserve a higher rating than my enjoyment of them may suggest.


message 29: by Kelly H. (Maybedog) (last edited May 14, 2009 05:13PM) (new)

Kelly H. (Maybedog) I'm reading The Speed of Dark by Elizabeth Moon which those of you who liked this book might like as well. It's another story from the perspective of an autistic man. I'm only a little way into it but it's excellent so far.


message 30: by Brad (new)

Brad That's on my list, Kelly. I keep hearing good things.


message 31: by Brad (new)

Brad My like votes have reached 41. One of my favourite primes.


message 32: by Liliana (new)

Liliana 1 ISNT A PRIME NUMBER KELLY


message 33: by Diane (new)

Diane Jortner Matthieu wrote: "1 is a strange number, absolutely."

I heard somewhere the "1 is the loneliest number there could ever be."


message 34: by Iris (new)

Iris clever...


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