Sue’s review of The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business > Likes and Comments

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message 1: by Linda S (new)

Linda S I liked your review very much and I learned quite a bit about habit formation. I always enjoy your reviews. Well written and informative.

Thanks,

Linda


message 2: by Caroline (last edited Oct 14, 2015 03:05AM) (new)

Caroline An excellent review!

But perhaps I would argue with this...

"But in case you really crave the self-help part of this book, here is Duhigg’s description of personal habit formation: A cue triggers a routine, which is the behavior you may want to change. There’s a reward inherent in that routine. Figure out what reward you really want, then change the routine to get it. The cue (an emotion, a time of day) will still be present, but you’ll respond with a different routine."

Like with the food vendors example that you gave - surely it is best, if possible, to remove the cue? One of my worst habits at the moment is reading a newspaper about three times a week, from start to finish. This wastes my precious time. I have tried disciplining myself to just reading fresh news, or news appropriate to my interests - but no - I find myself ploughing through the papers from start to finish, regardless of my good intentions. It is horribly time-consuming, and leaves me no time for reading books - my real love. I have decided to get rid of the cues, and will now only get a newspaper on Saturdays.

I have read nothing about corporate culture, but I have seen it in practice, in the various organisations I have worked in over the years. The effects of corporate changes can be dramatic - now you have made me want to read something on the subject!


message 3: by Sue (new)

Sue Caroline wrote: "An excellent review!

But perhaps I would argue with this...

"But in case you really crave the self-help part of this book, here is Duhigg’s description of personal habit formation: A cue triggers..."


You are absolutely right that removing the cue is the best approach. That's why I do not buy snack foods like potato chips (or crisps, depending upon where you are!). It's best that they not be in the house!

I think the alternative approach is for those situations which you can't change. If you crave a snack at work from the vending machine at 4:00 because your energy is flagging, you can't remove the vending machine!


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