Stephen’s review of 1984 > Likes and Comments

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message 1: by Lyndsey (new)

Lyndsey I completely agree! And as a twelve year old - there is NO way I could have appreciated this book. I mean at the time, I thought that Ender's Game was the most insightful book on the planet. But this is a must read for anyone, even those who aren't into dystopia.

And I love the Monty Python reference! :-)


message 2: by TK421 (new)

TK421 I wish I could give you extra "likes" because of the Monty Python picture.


message 3: by Stephen (new)

Stephen I figure you can never go wrong with a good Monty Python reference.


message 4: by Stephen (new)

Stephen Lyndsey wrote: "I completely agree! And as a twelve year old - there is NO way I could have appreciated this book. I mean at the time, I thought that Ender's Game was the most insightful book on the planet. But th..."

Thanks Lyndsey. That Monty Python quote just seemed to fit perfectly.


message 5: by Jeffrey (new)

Jeffrey I first read the book in high school in several different classes, and it happens that I was in college in 1984 and read it again in my English class and science fiction class as well. Its a great book, personally one of the best.


message 6: by Stephen (new)

Stephen I agree...just goes to show you that quality books stand the test of time.


message 7: by Zulfiya (new)

Zulfiya This is a brilliant example how a fun and dazzling review can also be thorough and compelling. Excellent job.


message 8: by Stephen (new)

Stephen Zulfiya wrote: "This is a brilliant example how a fun and dazzling review can also be thorough and compelling. Excellent job."

Thank you, Zulfiya!


message 9: by Kat (new)

Kat I read it as a freshman in high school- it definitely haunts me still.


message 10: by Kate (new)

Kate After reading your review, I really need to re-read this book.


message 11: by Stephen (new)

Stephen Kat wrote: "I read it as a freshman in high school- it definitely haunts me still."

This one can definitely stay with you long after you put the book down.


message 12: by Stephen (new)

Stephen Kate wrote: "After reading your review, I really need to re-read this book."

That's nice to hear, Kate. Thank you.


message 13: by mark (new)

mark monday i read this one on mushrooms back in college, while listening to the eurythmics 'soundtrack' on my headphones. it was a bad trip!

i tried to encapsulate the bad trip in my review of the novel, but upon recently re-reading that review, i suddenly had a spasm of anxiety (maybe it was a flashback!) and had to edit out all the drug references.


message 14: by Stephen (new)

Stephen mark wrote: "i read this one on mushrooms back in college, while listening to the eurythmics 'soundtrack' on my headphones. it was a bad trip!

i tried to encapsulate the bad trip in my review of the novel, ..."


I just read your review. I reall liked the phrase an "ending to make your heart shrivel." I think that is perfect as it is an unhappy classic. But I think I has to be.


message 15: by Stephanie (new)

Stephanie I can't believe I haven't read this book yet. There should some list I should be put on for that. I think I'm scared.

great review.


message 16: by Lindsey (new)

Lindsey Lang Stephanie wrote: "I can't believe I haven't read this book yet. There should some list I should be put on for that. I think I'm scared.

great review."


i'm so with you! i've been meaning to read it for years and finally picked it up at goodwill last month, hopefully i'll actually read it now!


message 17: by Randy (new)

Randy I first read this one in high school as well. I can't really explain why, but it's one of the few books I've read more than twice and one of the even fewer I've read more than a half dozen times in my sixty-one years. It just speaks to me I suppose.


Whispers from the Pirate's Ghost Whisper See what I mean? I love the review. I had to read this in High School and, I couldn't tell you what I got out of it... I'm glad I read it as an adult. Boy, how this might be applied to recent history? ...(yes, that's a cue the villian music)

Thanks Stephen. Another great review.


message 19: by Stephen (new)

Stephen Kat wrote: "Stephen wrote: "I figure you can never go wrong with a good Monty Python reference."

So true.

P.S. Loved the review."


Thanks, Kat.


message 20: by Mike (new)

Mike Vasich One of my all time faves. And I love the fact that I actually read 1984 in 1984 (the first time, anyway). As a 13 year old, I did get a lot out of it, actually (I think it was because I was too nerdy for girls, so I had plenty of time to read). Among the many things that stick with me about this book are the scene in room 101 and the scene with Winston and Julia on the bench. Both are frozen in my brain.


message 21: by Stephen (new)

Stephen Room 101 is stamped on my memory as well, Mike. That and the very last line of the novel, one of the best closing sentences ever.


message 22: by Mike (new)

Mike Vasich Yeah, that last line--"I have been and always shall be your friend. Live long and prosper." Classic stuff!


message 23: by Richard (last edited Jan 30, 2012 10:06PM) (new)

Richard Mike wrote: "Yeah, that last line--"I have been and always shall be your friend. Live long and prosper." Classic stuff!"

Mike, for a minute there you had me believing that Orwell ripped his ending off from Star Trek! And you would have gotten away with it too, if I hadn't pulled my copy of the book off my shelves. But still a spocktacular joke!


message 24: by Stephen (new)

Stephen Mike wrote: "Yeah, that last line--"I have been and always shall be your friend. Live long and prosper." Classic stuff!"

Well played, sir. Well played.


message 25: by Elen (new)

Elen Neuve George Orwell comletely ripped off his 1984 from Yevgeny Zamyatin 's We (published in 1921)
Yevgeny Zamyatin 's We novel is much better. I recommend it to everyone who liked 1984
Zamyatin E.Мы


message 26: by Stephen (new)

Stephen I appreciate your enthusiasm for the novel, Lala, but having read both novels I found 1984 to be far superior. We is a good novel, but I preferred 1984 by a significant margin.

I also don't understand the "ripping off" comment. I don't see striking similarities between the two novels apart from both of them being dystopias. Can you elaborate?


message 27: by Elen (last edited Feb 14, 2012 04:37PM) (new)

Elen Neuve George Orwell comletely ripped off his 1984 from Yevgeny Zamyatin 's We (published in 1921)
Yevgeny Zamyatin 's We novel is much better. I recommend it to everyone who liked 1984
Zamyatin E.Мы
Firstly, language and other stylistic and symbolic aspects are much better: We contains religious implications (references to the Bible) which 1984 is lacking. Commonly, countries with totalitarian regime forbid people to have any religious views.
Secondly, We is a story written by the real witness of creating of totalitarian regime (Bolshevism-Leninism-Stalinism) and personality cult (subsequently depersonalized and called Big Brother) or by allegedly a main character (as you wish).
Thirdy, it is a fact that Orwell has read We before writing 1984. And lets be frank Orwell has completely swiped the plot of the story with its major details.

Eventually,that is why it is easy to notice that We more truly depicts people`s life though it is anti-utopia.


message 28: by Simon (last edited Feb 14, 2012 05:28AM) (new)

Simon I have to say that I agree with Stephen here, although "We" was obviously a major influence on "1984", Orwell took it to a new level, his dystopian vision being far more complete and devastating as he pursued the implications of totalitarianism to its logical extreme.

"We" is still a very good novel though and I also would recommend it to anyone who liked "1984", I just think that Orwell surpassed Zamyatin with his novel. It's undoubtedly largely a personal preference though.


message 29: by E.V.Franzmnn (new)

E.V.Franzmnn E.V.Franzmnn I so need to read this book,,Oh, Is Big Brother season here in Brazil, BTW,, LoL


message 30: by Chris (new)

Chris Perfect review. I vividly remember reading this in grade 9, a year before we were going to read it in school, and being floored. It was the first time I read a book and went WOW! Fiction can be prescient, relevant even. It blew my mind and made me love books.

Also this line is classic, and so true "I think that this is a book that is best appreciated AFTER your first pimple. "

Thanks


message 31: by Willow (last edited Dec 07, 2013 08:48PM) (new)

Willow Excellent, awesome review! You captured my feelings exactly. I remember the first time I read this I was in high school, and while I was intrigued by the story, I know I didn't feel the full power of Winston's loss. The second time I read it, I got tears in my eyes. Seeing Winston crushed like a bug is a gut wrenching experience, and what really stays with you is that we all know it could happen.


message 32: by David W. (new)

David W. I think it's a check to the social/political "loosening" that this book can now be openly sold in my country, both in Chinese and in original English.


message 33: by Riku (new)

Riku Sayuj lovely, lively review. thanks!


Rangergamer reads I love the review!


message 35: by Talitha (new)

Talitha Great review! Couldn't have said it better myself. Brilliant is the right word, and I think GR should create a '5+ amazing' button just for books like this.

I read Animal Farm in high school, and I'm actually glad I didn't read 1984 back then. Although I've always loved reading, as a teen I hated the mandatory school reads. I'm glad I read it as an adult, and it's my all time fav!

I was wondering, I'm currently reading Brave New World, how do other 1984 fans like that novel?


message 36: by David W. (last edited Sep 10, 2014 07:26PM) (new)

David W. I've only scratched the surface of BNW, apparently the BNW world keeps the people down by mindless pleasure as opposed to poverty and mind-control like the 1984 world. I've read somewhere that the authors once argued against each other about which dystopia would "work" better.


message 37: by Talitha (new)

Talitha Yes, but I do see similarities in concept, although differently executed. In 1984, thought is controlled by language. In BNW, people are conditioned to think a certain way. It is very different in the way people are controlled, but they are controlled nevertheless.

Of course, they both present a different world view and social critique, and I think both are very valuable. As a work of fiction however, I like 1984 better.


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