Stephen’s review of The Odyssey > Likes and Comments

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message 1: by Karla (new)

Karla I always liked The Iliad more, but The Odyssey is still tremendous. Only dry bits are Nestor's wheezing, endless tales. Guy never shuts up. :P


message 2: by Stephen (new)

Stephen Karla (Mossy Love Grotto) wrote: "I always liked The Iliad more, but The Odyssey is still tremendous. Only dry bits are Nestor's wheezing, endless tales. Guy never shuts up. :P"

I was planning on giving the Iliad the same treatment as I have not read it since college either. I have the Pope translation of the book in my Easton Press collection but hear that the Fagles version is the place to start (for the same reasons that I mentioned in my review). Do you have a version you particularly like?


message 3: by Karla (last edited Sep 05, 2011 01:53PM) (new)

Karla I've listened to an Fagles version (abridged) narrated by Derek Jacobi. Liked that one very much, same with the Robert Fitzgerald translation (book version). I had to read the Lattimore one in college and found it a tough slog.


The Pirate Ghost (Formerly known as the Curmudgeon) Next the Anead! Right? Gotta get a greek brother home right?


message 5: by Lori (new)

Lori Wow, Derek Jacobi, now that's a perfect match. I too prefer the Iliad more, at least when I read both in college. All those gods and goddesses bickering like 2 year olds, but the humans feel the consequences.


message 6: by Stephen (new)

Stephen Karla (Mossy Love Grotto) wrote: "I've listened to an Fagles version narrated by Derek Jacobi. Liked that one very much, same with the Robert Fitzgerald translation. I had to read the Lattimore one in college and found it a tough s..."

I saw the Fagles version narrated by Jacobi and that would be my pick. Unfortunately, the version I found was abridged (which makes no sense to me). Hopefully, there is an unabridged version as well.

Thanks for the recommendations.


message 7: by Stephen (new)

Stephen Hugh (The other Hugh) wrote: "Next the Anead! Right? Gotta get a greek brother home right?"

Yes, the The Aeneid is on the list as well.


message 8: by Karla (last edited Sep 05, 2011 02:01PM) (new)

Karla Now you should branch out into the Greek dramas that are basically Homeric fanfiction by Sophocles, Euripides, Aeschylus... ;-)


message 9: by Stephen (new)

Stephen Karla (Mossy Love Grotto) wrote: "Now you should branch out into the Greek dramas that are basically Homeric fanfiction by Sophocles, Euripides, Aeschylus... ;-)"

I have Easton Press editions of about a dozen of them and am planning on doing just that. I remember reading Lysistrata, Antigone and Agamemnon (maybe one or two others) and enjoying them, but it will likely still be a "new" experience when I revisit them since it has been so long and my tastes have changed.


message 10: by Karla (new)

Karla Good luck on the re-reads. Euripides' Medea & Sophocles' Electra are my favorites. I also liked The Frogs, despite the semester-long agony of reading it in Greek. (And struggling through the Greek will make a person appreciate ANY English translation!)


message 11: by Stephen (new)

Stephen Wow...you read The Frogs in the original Greek. Kudos to you. That is an accomplishment.


message 12: by Karla (new)

Karla It was fun. Today I don't remember a bit of it. But fun at the time!


message 13: by Daniel (new)

Daniel I agree with your sentiments: the Odyssey has some brutal moments (and the Iliad? Much more so!). I also like the Fagles translation for its accessibility. The rhyming couplets in Pope's translation are too distracting for my tastes.


message 14: by Stephen (new)

Stephen Daniel wrote: "the Odyssey has some brutal moments (and the Iliad? Much more so!)..."

Nothing like a nice Greek blood bath.


message 15: by Susinok (new)

Susinok Awsome review! I've read and re-read the Odyssey since 9th grade. It's my all time favorite Greek Epic.

The Fagles translation is really good, as is the Lord Ian McKellen narration.

The only thing that threw me out of the story was the repeated use of the phrase "get off Scot free". What Scot in Ancient Greece?


message 16: by Karla (new)

Karla Susinok wrote: "What Scot in Ancient Greece? "




message 17: by Stephen (new)

Stephen Susinok wrote: "The only thing that threw me out of the story was the repeated use of the phrase "get off Scot free". What Scot in Ancient Greece?"

That didn't register with me while I was listening to it, but you're absolutely right. They should have used a better phrase.


message 18: by Stephen (new)

Stephen Karla (Mossy Love Grotto) wrote: "Susinok wrote: "What Scot in Ancient Greece? "

"


LOL...well played, Karla.


message 19: by Karla (new)

Karla I couldn't resist.


message 20: by Stephen (new)

Stephen I can see why. A set up like that doesn't come around very often.


message 21: by Kate (new)

Kate I'm a huge fan of this one too! I'm so glad you enjoyed it. I'm currently reading The Suitors By Ben Ehrenreich which is a modern retelling and to be honest very well done with great attention to detail, in case you're interested, that is.


message 22: by Stephen (new)

Stephen Kate wrote: "I'm a huge fan of this one too! I'm so glad you enjoyed it. I'm currently reading The Suitors By Ben Ehrenreich which is a modern retelling and to be honest very well done with great attention to d..."

Thanks, Kate. That sounds intersting. I am big fan of retelling/reimaginings when they are done well. I will check it out.


message 23: by Shelly (new)

Shelly Great review, Stephen. I think it's time I read this.


message 24: by Stephen (new)

Stephen Shelly wrote: "Great review, Stephen. I think it's time I read this."

Thanks, Shelly. You really should. It's a great read.


message 25: by Christian (new)

Christian I've seen the 1997 film - twice - and it was hands-down the most epic story of all time. Whether it went from blinding the cyclops to escaping death numerous times, The Odyssey never let me leave for a minute. Your review only further encourages me to read the book, and now, I'm definitely mind-set on doing so.


message 26: by Stephen (new)

Stephen I'm glad, Chris, and thanks for kind words. I haven't seen the movie but I will check it out. Sounds terrific.


message 27: by Eligah (new)

Eligah Boykin jr. Enjoyed your comments! You're the only one I know who has subscribed to the Easton Press '100 Greatest Books Ever Written' like me. I particularly liked how you perused 'The Odyssey' in oral and printed forms and different translations in order to glean full reading pleasure in all possible dimensions!


message 28: by Arshadul (new)

Arshadul Great man.


message 29: by Nicolyn (new)

Nicolyn Martin Review rocks, really helped me out. Totally want to read the Odyssey and more Homer now!!!!!


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