Shovelmonkey1’s review of The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe (Chronicles of Narnia, #1) > Likes and Comments

59 likes · 
Comments (showing 1-31 of 31) (31 new)    post a comment »
dateDown arrow    newest »

message 1: by Richard (last edited Feb 28, 2012 03:28PM) (new)

Richard Derus Heh. Iconoclast.

[image error]


message 2: by Shovelmonkey1 (new)

Shovelmonkey1 Thanks -that's the nicest thing anyone has said to me all day!


message 3: by Mark (new)

Mark i absolutely adore this whole Narnia series though am half hearted about 'A Horse and his boy' but this review really made me laugh as did Richard's comment.

'Ruled in supremely effective manner by single minded, highly organised, independent woman until arrival of children and large pet'

that is such a wonderfully dismissive sentence I think I shall have to start a new collection. This will be a new collection to go with all those fabulous one line reviews that can be encountered on these pages.


message 4: by Andy (new)

Andy Potter I just love the book for its story, never mind the symbolism and things like that.


message 5: by Stephanie (new)

Stephanie This review reminds me of Ambrose Bierce's Devil's Dictionary. :)


message 6: by Shovelmonkey1 (new)

Shovelmonkey1 I like the sound of that. What is it?


message 7: by Stephanie (new)

Stephanie Ambrose Bierce is a California author known for his cynical humor. "The Devil's Dictionary" is formatted like a regular dictionary, but with humorous definitions and poems.

For instance, this is how he defines marriage:
Marriage, n. The state or condition of a community consisting of a master, a mistress, and two slaves, making in all, two."

There are several editions. I had to read the unabridged version for college. It's longer and has a lot of notes.

Hope this helps. :)


message 8: by Shovelmonkey1 (new)

Shovelmonkey1 Richard just recommended it to me so I'm all up to speed now. Thanks!


message 9: by Joel (new)

Joel Adams I believe that Lewis chose a Lion, which is typically aggressive because human beings can be very aggressive, and Jesus was the human being the way we were meant to be. So using a Lion that is tame (yet also powerful) was his comparison to human beings.


message 10: by Shovelmonkey1 (new)

Shovelmonkey1 And they are the noble king of the beasts


message 11: by Mark (new)

Mark A said:- "So using a Lion that is tame (yet also powerful) was his comparison to human beings."

Sorry to be a tad anally retentive but isn't that the very opposite of what Mr Beaver says to Lucy as Aslan walks off without saying goodbye when he tells her ' He doesn't like being tied down........He'll often drop in. Only you mustn't press him. He's wild, you know. Not like a tame lion'


message 12: by Cecily (new)

Cecily Good point about the lion: Jesus is more usually associated with a lamb or a dove, but I suppose it would have been a less exciting story.

As for Bierce's "Devil's Dictionary", you can browse it here: http://www.thedevilsdictionary.com/


message 13: by Listin (new)

Listin Abey worst review


message 14: by Mark (new)

Mark Listin wrote: "worst review"

Shovelmonkey needs no noble Knight to come to fight her corner I realize but I would point out, Listin, its what one often calls humour on this site. I love the Narnia chronicles myself but can still recognize a clever concept review when i read one.


message 15: by Listin (new)

Listin Abey Mark thanks for your point even now i didn't realize the humor you are talking about
seriously i didn't know how English men makes jokes :-)


message 16: by Mark (new)

Mark Listin wrote: "Mark thanks for your point even now i didn't realize the humor you are talking about
seriously i didn't know how English men makes jokes :-)"


Don't worry Listin. Lots of the comments I make which I think are funny I often find I am the only person who does so perhaps I am not the best of Englishmen from which to take a course in british humour . Happy reading


message 17: by Shovelmonkey1 (last edited Oct 04, 2012 04:05AM) (new)

Shovelmonkey1 Listin wrote: "worst review"

Just noticed this comment-thanks for the input - duly noted - care to elaborate? I thought i might look at what your thoughts were but it appears you don't write reviews.


message 18: by Shovelmonkey1 (new)

Shovelmonkey1 Listin wrote: "Mark thanks for your point even now i didn't realize the humor you are talking about
seriously i didn't know how English men makes jokes :-)"


And thanks for the chivalry ;)


message 19: by Tim (new)

Tim For Christ as a lion, you need to know the biblical background Lewis had in mind. Genesis 49:8-12 speaks of Judah, one of the twelve tribes of Israel, as a lion and says the tribe would be the source of a ruler. This was understood to be fulfilled in King David. The prophets spoke of a coming Savior-King (Messiah) who would be a descendant of David. Christians believe that Jesus is that Messiah (= Christ). See Revelation 5:5, which refers to Christ as "the Lion of Judah". In the next verse he appears as a lamb. Complicated, yes, but I am sure Lewis was well aware of it.


message 20: by Miriam (new)

Miriam There's something very "peacable kingdom" about Narnia, too (despite the violence) what with all the animal species getting along based on moral choices rather than the food chain.


message 21: by Shovelmonkey1 (new)

Shovelmonkey1 If nothing else I should have remembered haille Selassie and the lion of Judah! What was I thinking?


message 22: by Matthew (new)

Matthew Collins I did find the review kind of funny, but I also reject any one interpretation of any book, regardless of authorial intent. books are what you get out of them, not what the author wanted you to get. I'm reading this book for the first time right now, like it so far.


message 23: by Mark (new)

Mark Ricketts The reason god is represented as a lion is because lions symbolize a "king" of animals just like god is king of all the people. Also a lion represents power and loyalty and courage and lastly, god is referred to in the bible as a lion ( the lion and the lamb)


message 24: by Jessica (new)

Jessica Your review made me laugh! I loved this book. I didn't know it reflected religion until someone mentioned that to me. At which point I said, oh yea, I guess it is. I see that now!


message 25: by Shovelmonkey1 (new)

Shovelmonkey1 Matthew wrote: "I did find the review kind of funny, but I also reject any one interpretation of any book, regardless of authorial intent. books are what you get out of them, not what the author wanted you to get..."

Thanks - it is a much beloved classic so only gentle fun poking was intended here. It was one of my favourite books as a child, long before I saw any religious inference in the stories.


message 26: by Francesca (new)

Francesca Giuliano Lions aren't solitary creatures. They have a pack mentality. Tigers are solitary animals. A famous magician inches said that he'd much rather work with a pack if tigers then lions. At least if he got stuck in a cage with the tigers they would be more preoccupied on getting rid of each other then him. If he was stuck in a cage with lions, they would quickly figure out a hierarchy system and then focus all their attention on him.


message 27: by Jonathan (new)

Jonathan Hughes Jesus is known as the lion of the tribe of Judah. That is why a lion was used. This topic talks about the lack of gentiles. All animation mysteriously does not have them. There is an undercurrent of hatred for them from the devil himself through people.


message 28: by Spencer (new)

Spencer Kopp So true. Defiantly nailed the symbolism.


message 29: by Ayu (new)

Ayu Nuri for the lion = god in this. i agree. there is a reason why his name is aslan


message 30: by Kethia (new)

Kethia I read it when I first came to the U.S.and my English was limited. I didn't grasp the fact that the book was about good and evil


message 31: by Hannah (new)

Hannah I think you missed the point of the book.
Edmund can represent Judas, but I believe the more accurate interpretation is that he represents us. It's not just "some character" who messed up and betrayed Aslan/God, it's us. And that is what makes Lewis's story so personal and powerful.


back to top