Mike’s review of The Death of Ivan Ilych > Likes and Comments

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message 1: by Drew (new)

Drew Constance Garnett almost ruined Crime and Punishment for me.


message 2: by Mike (new)

Mike Puma Drew wrote: "Constance Garnett almost ruined Crime and Punishment for me."

She's a mixed blessing. Her translations are what many English speakers have read, and the stories survive, but I guess I'm just one so focused on language that I prefer to believe there's more to these stories and just the stories.


message 3: by s.penkevich (new)

s.penkevich Awesome, great story and review. Garnett is rough, she seems suck the juices out and give you your story a tad freeze dried, but nonetheless, she is the standard. The Pevear/Volokhonsky are pretty good, but have their own share of pitfalls as well.

Gerasim, especially in your quote, reminded me of the scenes with the old wheelchair guy and his muscly attendant in Clockwork Orange.


message 4: by Drew (new)

Drew Likewise. I found her prose style not to be very stylish. I remember having gotten past Raskolnikov's original murder and still being like, snore. I don't think I really got interested until Porfiry showed up.


message 5: by Drew (new)

Drew S., what are the pitfalls of the Pevear and Volokhonsky translations? I've only read their translation of Dead Souls, and thought it was quite good, very funny. Is it that they take maybe too much license?


message 6: by Mike (new)

Mike Puma Drew wrote: "S., what are the pitfalls of the Pevear and Volokhonsky translations? I've only read their translation of Dead Souls, and thought it was quite good, very funny. Is it that they take maybe too muc..."

No idea. This is the only translation I've read, and I don't read the language. It's just that this book seemed lacking, and what it lacked (to me) was the kind of language I expect in the 'canon.'


message 7: by s.penkevich (new)

s.penkevich Drew wrote: "S., what are the pitfalls of the Pevear and Volokhonsky translations? I've only read their translation of Dead Souls, and thought it was quite good, very funny. Is it that they take maybe too muc..."

So far they are my favorite translators, and have read their translation for War and Peace (Garnett had all the soldiers speak in cockney slang, wtf?), C&P and various Gogol. However, I've seen a lot of people complain that they jump to the same sets of words to often (I didn't really notice), and that they streamline the authors voice in a way. I didn't notice the latter until I read someone somewhere make that complaint and then began to pick up that they do tend to make the various authors sound a bit similar. But they keep normally thought of books flowing so smoothly and effortlessly that I reach for their translations every time still.


message 8: by Ian (new)

Ian "Marvin" Graye That story was enough to prick up my ears. (I think I've spelled that right.)


message 9: by Ian (new)

Ian "Marvin" Graye I have read all the old Dostoevsky translations and have recently bought all of the P&V ones (as well as the ones in between).

I am up for a discussion group on Dostoevsky if anyone else wants to have a crack at it.

My recollection is that I enjoyed him more than Tolstoy, although I enjoyed Gogol's "Dead Souls" too.


message 10: by s.penkevich (new)

s.penkevich Ian wrote: "I have read all the old Dostoevsky translations and have recently bought all of the P&V ones (as well as the ones in between).

I am up for a discussion group on Dostoevsky if anyone else wants to ..."


I am in!


message 11: by Mike (new)

Mike Puma s.penkevich wrote: "Ian wrote: "I have read all the old Dostoevsky translations and have recently bought all of the P&V ones (as well as the ones in between).

I am up for a discussion group on Dostoevsky if anyone ..."


Sorry. No tatoos allowed.


message 12: by s.penkevich (new)

s.penkevich Ha, oh.... I'm screwed then, I've got quite a few.


message 13: by Mike (new)

Mike Puma s.penkevich wrote: "Ha, oh.... I'm screwed then, I've got quite a few."

In that case, you'll need a waiver. Say, a Dostoeysky tat.


message 14: by s.penkevich (new)

s.penkevich On it!


message 15: by Jonfaith (new)

Jonfaith I needed this. Been wrestling with some grief issues at work and to compensate have composed a version of Candle in the Wind to respect Bobby Fischer and Van Cliburn; I’ve titled such Fuck You, Rick Santorum.


message 16: by Mike (new)

Mike Puma Always glad to be of service.


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