Nataliya’s review of The Girl Who Played with Fire (Millennium, #2) > Likes and Comments

97 likes · like
Comments (showing 1-29 of 29) (29 new)    post a comment »
dateDown_arrow    newest »

message 1: by Ab (new)

Ab Nice review, Nataliya.

As for the prose, these books were written actually in Swedish. It could be that the original prose got lost in less-than-impressive translation.


message 2: by Jason (new)

Jason Great review, Nataliya. I actually enjoyed the minute details of everyday life that were in the book. It is weird because I usually hate that sort of thing, but for some reason I enjoyed it.


message 3: by Brandon (new)

Brandon Great review, Nataliya. I tried to keep track of how many sandwiches Bloomkvist ate and how much coffee he consumed in the series but quickly became disoriented and lost track.


message 4: by Kris (new)

Kris Excellent review - you pinpointed some of the issues I had with this book. There are some much better examples of mysteries/thrillers that explore contemporary social problems with more finesse and greater impact. Last summer, I read the entire reissued Martin Beck series by Maj Sjöwall & Per Wahlöö -- also Swedish, fascinating look into a whole series of social issues in Sweden in the 1960s-1970s.


message 5: by Moira (last edited Aug 29, 2012 06:34AM) (new)

Moira Russell The style is clunky, the translation is bad (and was reportedly butchered by the publishers), the plot is silly (and just gets worse), but - LISBETH. I just adore her.


message 6: by Moira (new)

Moira Russell Kris wrote: "Last summer, I read the entire reissued Martin Beck series by Maj Sjöwall & Per Wahlöö -- also Swedish, fascinating look into a whole series of social issues in Sweden in the 1960s-1970s. "

Oh, I've been meaning to read those! Neat....


message 7: by Kris (new)

Kris Moira wrote: "Oh, I've been meaning to read those! Neat.... "

I can't wait to hear what you think of them. Martin Beck is a great character - he's clearly a formative influence on other Scandinavian detectives in more recent series.


message 8: by Tracy (new)

Tracy Great review, Nataliya. I actually did enjoy the minutiae, but I can see how a lot of people would be turned off by this. The most awesome thing about these books really is Lisbeth Salander. She really kicks ass. And I really enjoyed Larsson's defense of the rights of women not to be abused.


message 9: by Nataliya (new)

Nataliya Ab wrote: "Nice review, Nataliya.

As for the prose, these books were written actually in Swedish. It could be that the original prose got lost in less-than-impressive translation."


Oh, I bet that's partially the case. But my main gripe is with the sheer amount of detail - oh my, do I really need to know everything about every minute detail of the characters' lives? Do I care whether Blomkvist's phone is a Motorola or a Samsung? Or what was the exact price of Lisbeth's apartment? Or what are the exact contents of her fridge?

And some of you will agree with me:

Brandon wrote: "Great review, Nataliya. I tried to keep track of how many sandwiches Bloomkvist ate and how much coffee he consumed in the series but quickly became disoriented and lost track."

... And many more of you will not:

Jason wrote: "Great review, Nataliya. I actually enjoyed the minute details of everyday life that were in the book. It is weird because I usually hate that sort of thing, but for some reason I enjoyed it."

Tracy wrote: "Great review, Nataliya. I actually did enjoy the minutiae, but I can see how a lot of people would be turned off by this. The most awesome thing about these books really is Lisbeth Salander. She re..."

... but in the end, it's the awesomeness of Lisbeth that makes this book worth reading!

Moira wrote: "The style is clunky, the translation is bad (and was reportedly butchered by the publishers), the plot is silly (and just gets worse), but - LISBETH. I just adore her."


message 10: by Jason (new)

Jason Ha! Great montage.


message 11: by Nataliya (new)

Nataliya Jason wrote: "Ha! Great montage."

Thanks. ~Bows deeply~


Derek (Guilty of thoughtcrime) Nataliya wrote: "Ab wrote: "Nice review, Nataliya.

As for the prose, these books were written actually in Swedish. It could be that the original prose got lost in less-than-impressive translation."

Oh, I bet that's partially the case. But my main gripe is with the sheer amount of detail - oh my, do I really need to know everything about every minute detail of the characters' lives?"


I don't think that is the case, except I can't read Swedish, so I can't really say the translation is good, but I read a lot of mysteries/thrillers in translation (at least half a dozen Scandinavians, and two Italians), and this works as well as any. I think the verbosity is really about Lisbeth. She's a high-functioning autistic. She is very detail oriented. All that detail is intended to get you into her mindset.

As for the posthumous editing, it's my understanding that the books were actually edited before Larsson died, and only published afterwards (Wikipedia isn't much help, it only says he "had made no attempt to get them published until shortly before his death", which implies they'd been sent to publishers, but not necessarily that any publisher had done anything with them).

Silly plot? I've read far worse.


message 13: by Nataliya (new)

Nataliya I actually thought that the attention to detail, including constant mentioning of brand names and such, stemmed from Larsson's journalistic background. At times, it read almost like a magazine piece.
As for the story - I've read plenty of books with worse storylines, but regardless this book's plot is still weak. But having amazingly cool Lisbeth as a central character made up for much of that.


Derek (Guilty of thoughtcrime) Nataliya wrote: "... regardless this book's plot is still weak"

I can live with weak, I just wouldn't go as far as silly!


message 15: by Jurgen_i (new)

Jurgen_i I agree that there are books with worse plot, but my word is SILLY and even this is rather mild expression.

Nataliya wrote: "But my main gripe is with the sheer amount of detail - oh my, do I really need to know everything about every minute detail of the characters' lives? Do I care whether Blomkvist's phone is a Motorola or a Samsung? Or what was the exact price of Lisbeth's apartment?"

You know, for me the writing (not only style, but the text itself) is maybe the best aspect of this book. I do really want to know, whether character uses phone by Samsung or by Nokia, drives a Mercedes or Dodge, eats pasta or Chinese noodles and so on. Such details create the world. Thanks to such details, I feel that the book isn't just a plot surrounded by decorations, but that the story is developing in a world. Maybe Larsson a bit overused such details, but i liked it.

Nataliya wrote: "full marks for the awesome message of the story"

I agree that this topic should be brought to an attention, but it's better not to touch a topic at all than to do as Larsson did in this book. First book was really good and that is why the disappointment was even larger. I agree with Kris that there are better explorations of social problems.

Nataliya wrote: "but in the end, it's the awesomeness of Lisbeth that makes this book worth reading!"

And here i disagree completely. Lisbeth is what spoiled this book! In the second book Larsson became obsessed with Lisbeth and more than a half of the text consisted of reflections of almost every character, whether Lisbeth is guilty or not. Facts didn't matter, what mattered was a belief. Those who believed in Lisbeth's innocence were good characters, who in her guilt - were villains. And such void reflections are those things i don't want to read.
Besides, Lisbeth is just an unreal and cheating character - and this was growing exponentially to almost immortality and godlikeness. If i want to read about superheroes, i will take proper literature, but in a "social" literature i do want to see REAL humans. I do really like kick-ass heroines, but it's not the case with Lisbeth.

ATTENTION! SPOILER!
Nataliya, it's in your professional area: could Lisbeth survive in reality arter what had happened to her at the end of the book? I don't remember everything, but what i remember is more than enough. She was severely beaten, she was shot three times (one shot disabled her hand, another made a hole in her skull), she was buried (as a result, some soil should have entered her skull - to the brains). She was anorectic! And after all this she dug herself out? Impossible? Am i wrong?


message 16: by Jason (new)

Jason Jurgen_i wrote: "ATTENTION! SPOILER!
(view spoiler) Am i wrong? "


I think you're wrong only because (view spoiler)


message 17: by Derek (Guilty of thoughtcrime) (last edited Sep 02, 2012 06:17AM) (new)

Derek (Guilty of thoughtcrime) Jurgen_i wrote: "I agree that there are books with worse plot, but my word is SILLY and even this is rather mild expression."

I do wish someone would explain why it's silly. There's nothing in here that, individually, is not reported routinely in the media, and the way he brings the elements together is, at least, logical, and not overly dependent on outrageous coincidence (there is one truly annoying coincidence, which is the major reason why I consider this the poorest of the three books). I agree it's not nearly as believable as the first book, but I'm just not buying "silly".

Lisbeth is what spoiled this book!

Without Lisbeth, there is no book! Neither this book, nor either of the others in the series is about Mikael Blomkvist - they're about Lisbeth.


message 18: by Jurgen_i (new)

Jurgen_i Jason wrote: "I think you're wrong only because [spoilers removed]"

Not quite: (view spoiler)


Derek (Guilty of thoughtcrime) Again, it's not something that you can't find news reports of elsewhere. It's highly unlikely, but it's not impossible. And far more believable than your average Sylvester Stallone movie.


message 20: by Nataliya (new)

Nataliya Jurgen_i wrote: "Nataliya, it's in your professional area: could Lisbeth survive in reality arter what had happened to her at the end of the book? I don't remember everything, but what i remember is more than enough. She was severely beaten, she was shot three times (one shot disabled her hand, another made a hole in her skull), she was buried (as a result, some soil should have entered her skull - to the brains). She was anorectic! And after all this she dug herself out? Impossible? Am i wrong? "

Jurgen, what is in Lisbeth's favor here is that she is young and healthy. I've seen pretty miraculous recoveries of young and healthy people in the ICU before - and undoubtedly a little bit of luck was involved each time. So yes, it's possible for her to survive after all that.


message 21: by Michael Fierce (new)

Michael Fierce I don't think I could get into a book with a character named Lisbeth Salamander.


message 22: by Nataliya (new)

Nataliya Michael wrote: "I don't think I could get into a book with a character named Lisbeth Salamander."

It would almost be like the War with the Newts! ;)


message 23: by Moira (new)

Moira Russell Kris wrote: "I can't wait to hear what you think of them. Martin Beck is a great character - he's clearly a formative influence on other Scandinavian detectives in more recent series. "

Are they on the Kindle? Heh, heh.

- The other thing about the Kindle is, no anticipation of packages arriving in the mail. men this is great for my compulsive personality - NO MORE WAITING! IT'S THERE! de in an IJ-sense it's like I'm being Entertained. Not that good.


message 24: by Moira (new)

Moira Russell Michael wrote: "I don't think I could get into a book with a character named Lisbeth Salamander."

...whereas SOME of us would be intrigued....


Doesn't Lisbeth rise from her grave after three days? Heh, heh.


message 25: by Michael Fierce (new)

Michael Fierce Nataliya wrote: "Michael wrote: "I don't think I could get into a book with a character named Lisbeth Salamander."

It would almost be like the War with the Newts! ;)"


Damn, girl, that was funny. Jeez I'm an old man so please don't misread the intention of this compliment but you are a very talented writer / reviewer, a resident physician, very cute, and hilarious to boot! Don't you have any chinks in your armor!? :)


message 26: by Michael Fierce (new)

Michael Fierce Moira wrote: "Michael wrote: "I don't think I could get into a book with a character named Lisbeth Salamander."

...whereas SOME of us would be intrigued....


Doesn't Lisbeth rise from her grave after three day..."


SHI+ - that was funny too somehow!


message 27: by Nataliya (new)

Nataliya Thanks, Michael! I'm flattered.


message 28: by Michael Fierce (last edited Sep 09, 2012 06:17PM) (new)

Michael Fierce :)


message 29: by Ulises (new)

Ulises i also hated the enormous list of trademarks and the slow intro to the story. a little bit of action in the first chapters would have been nice.
never the less a very good book


back to top