Caris’s review of The Sense of an Ending > Likes and Comments

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message 1: by Trudi (new)

Trudi Your thoughtfulness and honesty has forced me into an uncomfortable contemplative mood. Great review, but ... drat.


message 2: by Caris (new)

Caris Sorry about that. Misery loves company or some such cliche. Let's blame the book, as it did it to me. Like a social disease passed through words.


message 3: by Paquita Maria (new)

Paquita Maria Sanchez Stop actin' all sheepish and shit, Caris; this review rules.


message 4: by Caris (new)

Caris Aww, shucks.


message 5: by Eh?Eh! (new)

Eh?Eh! I tried to find that Dutchman. Get off my back already.


message 6: by Miriam (new)

Miriam Go play with the baby, Caris. It puts things in perspective.


message 7: by Caris (new)

Caris David wrote: "I didn't really feel like Tony started out that strong(?) Seemed to me he didn't really change much.. His 'ideals' never really seemed like more than pretentious fantasies to me, which he kept havi..."

I mean "strong" as in "idealistic," as kids should be. His ideas are super pretentious, that's for sure. It was difficult to watch him go from such lofty musings to such a boring, comfortable existence. It made me think of all the middle managers in our little corner of the world who, in all reality, were probably rather bright as students. It's that death blow that reality seems to deliver to so many college graduates that struck a chord with me. But, no, he didn't start out any stronger than anyone else.



Bird Brian wrote: "I dunno about the bookshelves bit. Isn't a bookshelf that reflects who you want to be more interesting than one that reflects who you already are? The former implies some sort of growth ahead; the ..."

On many levels, I agree with you. But these books were who he wanted to be, but never expended the effort to become. Those books will remain forever unread. They were symbolic of lost potential. I like the idea of growing into an idea, projecting who you want to be and working to make it happen. That's what makes for a dynamic character (or human being). But this was just sad. It was like building an idealized image of yourself that, not so deep down, you recognize you'll never achieve. He's a poseur and will always be one.


message 8: by Ian (new)

Ian Paganus de Fish Bird Brian wrote: "Isn't a bookshelf that reflects who you want to be more interesting than one that reflects who you already are?"

If only we could be as interesting as our true shelves ;)


message 9: by Jen (new)

Jen Caris wrote: "David wrote: "I didn't really feel like Tony started out that strong(?) Seemed to me he didn't really change much.. His 'ideals' never really seemed like more than pretentious fantasies to me, whic..."


This makes me want to go hide in all my unread books now and sob a little.


message 10: by Neil (new)

Neil Shapiro I will have to read this one. The idea of bookshelves reflecting who the owner is in some homes and who the owner wishes she/he might be is one that has occurred to me many times. My bookshelves reflect who I am when I try really hard.


message 11: by Ian (new)

Ian Paganus de Fish I held a party once and was flirting madly with a girl, until she escaped me and had a look around my bookshelves.

She eventually returned and said she had thought I was really superficial until she saw my books.

I told her I bought them by the meter ;)


message 12: by Ian (new)

Ian Paganus de Fish I wonder whether you can ever judge a bookist by their lover?


message 13: by Miriam (new)

Miriam Do you guys know those fake magazine and radio commercials Flann O'Brien wrote? There is one advertising a service where he will come to your home and make marginal notes in your books so you can fake having really read them. The cost is determined by how impressive the marginalia desired. He claimed that he had lots of people calling in thinking it was a real service and wanting to use it...


message 14: by Ian (new)

Ian Paganus de Fish What a great idea. It has an element of Pseud's Corner about it as well.

Mind you, I regard Good Reads as my avenue to scribble in the margins of life, too.


message 15: by Whitaker (new)

Whitaker Caris wrote: "Sorry about that. Misery loves company or some such cliche. Let's blame the book, as it did it to me. Like a social disease passed through words."

A textually transmitted disease!


message 16: by Ian (new)

Ian Paganus de Fish In which case the cure is Uncle Marvin's textual healing.


message 17: by Brad (new)

Brad I will spend all day looking at my shelves now, Caris. I think I will reorder my shelves, and create a shelf that matches hers. There are those books in there, amongst all the rabble. Thanks for your personal take on this.


message 18: by Caris (new)

Caris Brad wrote: "I will spend all day looking at my shelves now, Caris. I think I will reorder my shelves, and create a shelf that matches hers. There are those books in there, amongst all the rabble. Thanks for yo..."

That's a great idea. For those of us who are fakers, it would be nice to have a shelf that speaks the truth. Even if no one knows about it.


message 19: by Ian (new)

Ian Paganus de Fish Would you like to see my true shelf?

Is it just your read shelf? Or perhaps your reviewd shelf?


message 20: by Donna (new)

Donna I'm


message 21: by ·Karen· (new)

·Karen· Oh man! This is precisely the quandary I'm in right now. We have recently had our lounge redecorated and have stripped it right down to the minimalist essentials. All furniture, including the bookshelf that used to be here has been banished. Our more honest friends point out that it does look a bit like a furniture showroom, nothing personal. So I thought of having these (so cool, floating books!):

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But that put me in absolute agonies of which twelve to fifteen books would I put on there? It would have to be pseud's corner or fake or both. Aaaaaaaaaagh!


message 22: by Ian (new)

Ian Paganus de Fish Where are the to-reads?


message 23: by Ian (new)

Ian Paganus de Fish I'd be worried about your books' shelf-esteem.


message 24: by ·Karen· (new)

·Karen· Ian wrote: "Where are the to-reads?"

Due to banishment they are at present in double rows on the Billys in my study. Long live Billy.


message 25: by Ian (new)

Ian Paganus de Fish Oh no, what self-respecting book would want to be at the back of a double row?


message 26: by ☯Bettie☯ (new)

☯Bettie☯ Karen wrote: "Ian wrote: "Where are the to-reads?"

Due to banishment they are at present in double rows on the Billys in my study. Long live Billy."


YES, LONG LIVE BILLY - some of mine are doubled along 8 conjoined Billy sections and whenever I am looking for THE ONE it is always at the back of the very last I look in.

I play at "I'm not looking for you" in the bizarre hope that somehow 'it' will shuffle to the front


message 27: by ·Karen· (new)

·Karen· Yay! Swedish furniture stores forever!

AND that famous Swedish home of fine design has realised that their faithful customers have grown a little older along with them. The new sofas are from the Tidafors range: higher backs so that our heads no longer wag around like a balloon on a stick.


message 28: by ☯Bettie☯ (new)

☯Bettie☯ Aaaah - so you didn't just buy these then:




message 29: by Miriam (new)

Miriam You could go totally poncey and pick out some books that match the color accents in your new decor.


message 30: by ·Karen· (new)

·Karen· Miriam wrote: "You could go totally poncey and pick out some books that match the color accents in your new decor."

A bookseller told me once that people really did that - bought books on the colour of their jackets. And they had a customer who would take books home at the weekend and then bring them back on Mondays, they were only there to impress the weekend pick-up.


message 31: by Paquita Maria (new)

Paquita Maria Sanchez One thing I noticed in my years as a bookseller is that people hate buying movie tie-in covers. I mean, yeah, they're ugly, but it seemed like more than that: they wanted to buy the original cover so it was like they had the book before there even was a movie version to begin with. Even though they didn't.


message 32: by Eh?Eh! (new)

Eh?Eh! Hah! I do that, when there's a choice. I've avoided buying a book before because all that was available was a stack of "now a major motion picture!" editions. Why? I've thought I do it because I don't want to be thought of as being persuaded by a movie, that I read it because it was itself, a book. Kind of silly.


message 33: by Paquita Maria (new)

Paquita Maria Sanchez Added to which they are almost always hideous looking. I kept asking why they didn't just increase the orders on the regular paperbacks when something was coming out in the theaters, but nobody would listen to me. It's subtle, but it matters!


message 34: by Miriam (new)

Miriam Maybe the movie tie-in covers increase sales to people who hadn't heard of the book till they saw the movie?

I won't buy them, especially if they have the "now a major motion picture!" in a big foil-backed starburst.


message 35: by Ian (last edited Dec 08, 2011 05:54PM) (new)

Ian Paganus de Fish I think we should have removable stickers that say "I read this book before the film came out".


message 36: by Paquita Maria (new)

Paquita Maria Sanchez We don't need that these days, because we have goodreads trackin' our moves for us! Gr is watching you...gr knows, maaaaan.


message 37: by Paquita Maria (new)

Paquita Maria Sanchez Now THAT is some silly shit right there.


message 38: by Paquita Maria (new)

Paquita Maria Sanchez I'll take the wackiness right along with the restraint. Such an odd mix, that. Japan! I love you just how you are, baby!


message 39: by Paquita Maria (new)

Paquita Maria Sanchez Well, I was speaking of the original book being re-released with a movie poster cover, but you just did a lot in explaining to me why movie fanfic exists in the first place. I couldn't figure it out!


message 40: by Miriam (new)

Miriam I think the stickers that say "now a major motion picture!" should be removable so we can switch them onto books that are not made into movies and trick people into reading those.


message 41: by Paquita Maria (new)

Paquita Maria Sanchez Miriam wrote: "I think the stickers that say "now a major motion picture!" should be removable so we can switch them onto books that are not made into movies and trick people into reading those."

Now you're talkin'! A Good Man Is Hard To Find: Now a Major Motion Picture Starring Meg Ryan and Matthew McConaughey!


message 42: by Moira (new)

Moira Russell Ian wrote: "If only we could be as interesting as our true shelves ;)"

Ha!


message 43: by Moira (new)

Moira Russell Bird Brian wrote: "In Japan, you can tell from phone numbers when somebody got a phone"

Ha, Metafilter user numbers used to be like that.


message 44: by Moira (new)

Moira Russell Miriam wrote: "Do you guys know those fake magazine and radio commercials Flann O'Brien wrote?"

I LOVE YOU. That's one of my favourite things he ever did. The fake annotations are hilarious.


message 45: by Moira (new)

Moira Russell Miriam wrote: "You could go totally poncey and pick out some books that match the color accents in your new decor."

Nicholson Baker has written like three rueful articles about that phenomenon.


message 46: by Ian (new)

Ian Paganus de Fish Paquita Maria wrote: "Now you're talkin'! A Good Man Is Hard To Find: Now a Major Motion Picture Starring Meg Ryan and Matthew McConaughey!"

I'd rather see the prequel: "A Hard Man is Good to Find" (starring Mae West).


message 47: by Jason (new)

Jason Caris wrote: "It was easy to see myself in Tony. Too easy."

I think this hits the nail, Caris. The thing is, he and his friends have their shallow intellect on display in secondary school and that's fine (weren't we all idiots in high school?), but this dude never grows up. He's shallow to the core, even at 60. I think I'd agree that it would be frightening to recognize Tony in oneself, even part of onself, especially in adulthood.


message 48: by Caris (new)

Caris Beth369, please correct me if I'm wrong, but it seems as though you're making some pretty harsh judgments of me personally based on a book review. If I am incorrect, I will be happy to have you instruct me on what it means to be an adult. Thanks for taking the time to say something unnecessarily disparaging.


message 49: by Caris (new)

Caris Jason wrote: "Caris wrote: "It was easy to see myself in Tony. Too easy."

I think this hits the nail, Caris. The thing is, he and his friends have their shallow intellect on display in secondary school and that..."


That's it exactly, Jason. We were all idiots in high school, but it seems that (at least for myself) some of us are still part idiot years later. There's something wonderful about an adult with ideals, but there's something sad about an adult with shallow, intellectual ones. The bookshelf concept highlights that so well, I think.


message 50: by Jason (new)

Jason It does. And the fact that you can be an adult with ideals and still identify with Tony, even partly, is discomforting.

Ugh, I just saw Beth's comments now. I don't understand how disagreeing with someone's opinion should lead directly to an attack on their character. But whatever.


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