knig’s review of Slaughterhouse-Five > Likes and Comments

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message 1: by [deleted user] (new)

If it's any consolation this is my least favorite Vonnegut book, and I love just about everything else I've read by him. I have often wondered if there was something wrong with me for not liking this one more, so it's a relief to finally find someone else who was also not enthralled.


message 2: by sckenda (new)

sckenda I was introduced to this book in a lit to film class back in college. I have always liked it, but I came to it young before I had read other subversive/absurd/comic antiwar novels (like Catch 22). I admire the way Vonnegut took his trauma and turned it into art. He wrote it during a time of trauma in the USA (the Vietnam War and during a rash of political assasinations). I understand his melancholy. The moment is structured that way.

"Robert Kennedy, whose summer home is eight miles from the home I live in all year round, was shot two nights ago. He died last night. So it goes. Martin Luther King was shot a month ago. He died, too. So it goes. And every day my Government gives me a count of corpses created by military science in Vietnam. So it goes.


message 3: by knig (new)

knig Sean wrote: "If it's any consolation this is my least favorite Vonnegut book, and I love just about everything else I've read by him. I have often wondered if there was something wrong with me for not liking th..."

I remember his other stuff fondly as well, but I read it years ago. I'm apprehensive at the thought of a re-read, I want to retain the 'feel good' factor he gave my youthful enthusiasm. Maybe, like Steve points out above, if I'd read this way back in the day, it would have gone down differently.....


message 4: by knig (new)

knig Steve wrote: "I was introduced to this book in a lit to film class back in college. I have always liked it, but I came to it young before I had read other subversive/absurd/comic antiwar novels (like Catch 22). ..."

Isn't it amazing how he lived through the most electrically charged times, starting with WWII and then Kennedy and King? I still like catch-22 better though. As it happens, am reading a WWII 'memoir' yet again, totally different style, surprisingly good:

The Long Voyage


message 5: by Kimbrrrly (new)

Kimbrrrly I understand Vonnegut's humor more now that I'm older, and normally I love his writing style. This is one of the most readable war novels from an American perspective. However, the needless dog murder scene literally makes me sick, so I can't rate it as highly as I otherwise would.


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