Crystal Starr Light’s review of Divergent (Divergent, #1) > Likes and Comments

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message 1: by Lucy (new)

Lucy "In the Hunger Games, without Katniss, the revolution would really never have taken off. In Divergent, without Beatrice, absolutely nothing would have changed. Just sayin'"

Such an excellent point. It makes you feel like she chose the wrong character to train the camera on. There should have been someone more central to the story taking the lead.


Crystal Starr Light Lucy wrote: ""In the Hunger Games, without Katniss, the revolution would really never have taken off. In Divergent, without Beatrice, absolutely nothing would have changed. Just sayin'"

Such an excellent po..."


As I came to the very end, I realize that this, above all the other problems, was the worst. Sure, the world building is iffy (VERY iffy in my opinion), but the fact that our protagonist didn't do anything proactive for this revolution just really irked me. Katniss may not have been the head of the revolution, but she was its Mockingjay, its symbol. Without her actions in the Hunger Games, there would have been no rallying symbol, no call to arms, no instigation to fight.

Thanks for reading my review and taking the time to comment!


message 3: by Lindsey (new)

Lindsey This was awesome and essentially captured all of my major concerns about the book, which I did blow off because I was just so relieved not to have a triangle and the scenarios were interesting.


message 4: by K. (last edited Jul 20, 2011 10:02AM) (new)

K. I had the same exact questions about Dauntless and pretty much everything else you mentioned. They weren't brave to me, they were stupid. Particularly, the first initiation where they had to jump off the train THAT NEVER STOPPED MOVING, WHY? onto a rooftop which resulted in a death. Why would they try to kill off members? Yes it takes guts to do that but it doesn't mean they're a coward if they don't make it. It just means it was a dumbass dare to begin with. I know not.

But I still really liked it. SIGH.


Crystal Starr Light Lindsey wrote: "This was awesome and essentially captured all of my major concerns about the book, which I did blow off because I was just so relieved not to have a triangle and the scenarios were interesting."

I agree, I was SO glad that there wasn't another man vying for Tris' affections. I wonder how far into Insurgent we will get before one crops up (please, Roth, don't do it to us!!).

K. wrote: "I had the same exact questions about Dauntless and pretty much everything else you mentioned. They weren't brave to me, they were stupid. Particularly, the first initiation where they had to jump o..."

Yeah, what is with the trains that never stop, but slow down? How does the Dauntless not end up with thousands dead just because, whoops, someone tried to jump on the train and fell under the rails?


message 6: by Ploy (new)

Ploy You have brought up interesting points. When I read the book I didn't think of them, in fact, I really liked it. But this is something to really think over :)


message 7: by Jason (new)

Jason Stalides I missed that you read this. I'll be diving in soon. The thing with YA fiction is that it gets a sort of world-building get ail free card, Hunger Games included (which I surprised myself with how much I enjoyed it). The worlds work better as metaphors. And if you pull too hard at the strings...and all that. But there does have to be some consistency, and the world has to have a foundation that at least appears to make sense.


message 8: by Jason (new)

Jason Stalides *get out of jail free card (wish there was an edit function)


Crystal Starr Light The real problem with this book is that it broke my Willing Suspension of Disbelief. The world building just doesn't make sense (to me) and I can't look past it. And once this has happened, my brain refuses to turn off and it picks up EVERYTHING. Even things I'd have given a free pass.

And the thing is, seems like YA puts more of a priority on getting at least one romantic interest, it forgets critical components like characters and story. (And writing...)

I will be most interested in your take!!


message 10: by Jason (new)

Jason Stalides I can't help but think of that scene in the second Darth Bane book. Star Wars also does not hold up to close, real world scrutiny. The readers know this. But cross a certain line and it becomes silly. Insulting even. Although I liked that book a lot as well. I can overlook a lot for thd sake of a good story.


Crystal Starr Light As I was typing the above, I kept thinking of that very scene! Don't get me wrong, I still liked that book, but it wore my Suspension and made me pick out even the smallest details that didn't make sense.

There were parts of Divergent I liked, but that Suspension of Disbelief was nearly destroyed. The system of Factions made little sense, characters just weren't strong enough to stand out (other than the MC's, I remembered almost none of the characters when I read the sequel - something that has almost never happened to me!)...of course, many of these flaws are worse in the sequel (the sequel makes me tempted not to finish out the trilogy!).

The Hunger Games had its flaws, to be sure, but I thought it had a strong concept, a purpose beyond "I'm the next Harry Potter/Twilight/Fifty Shades", good characters, and decent world-building. A majority of Young Adult novels think that having a "kick ass" girl in a dystopian with two boys is what made THG the success it was and forget that what made THG good is the STORY, not the "dressing".


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