Flannery’s review of Ready Player One > Likes and Comments

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message 1: by Bridget (new)

Bridget Loved your nostalgiaporn comment. Now this one is on my must read list. Thanks


message 2: by Catie (new)

Catie Nice!


message 3: by Vinaya (new)

Vinaya You caught me. I'm secretly a jolly-looking eighty-year old man with a white beard and a penchant for red felt. Oh, and I breed reindeer in the North Pole. (view spoiler)


message 4: by Flannery (new)

Flannery I KNEW IT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


message 5: by Amber (new)

Amber Great review Flannery. Sounds interesting.


message 6: by Eric (new)

Eric Well that has my vote, I'm in!


message 7: by Flannery (new)

Flannery Eric, I have a feeling you'd love this.


message 8: by Crowinator (new)

Crowinator I am so looking forward to this book. I hope my future will be filled with 80s references too. Love the shoutout to The Westing Game in your review -- that used to be my favorite book when I was a kid.


message 9: by Flannery (new)

Flannery Me, too:) I still think the ending was so clever. Do they have RPO at your library yet? You should read it before it goes into circulation since it came out on Tuesday. It will only take you a day!


message 10: by Stephen (new)

Stephen Great review, Flannery. Your "nostalgia porn" comment may be the best two word description ever for this book. I am reading it now (or rather listening to it read by Wil Wheaton) and my entire childhood is flashing before my eyes.


message 11: by Flannery (new)

Flannery He is the perfect person to narrate this book. I plan on listening to the audiobook sometime soon. I look forward to your review--I know it'll be a good one!


message 12: by Eric (new)

Eric OMG OMG OMG Wil Wheaton narrates the audiobook! Flannery! You just made my day!


message 13: by AH (new)

AH Great review, Flannery. Sounds interesting.


message 14: by Chichipio (new)

Chichipio Time to confess: there's a tiny chance that I might not be a ferret. I hope you don't unfriend me.


message 15: by Emily (new)

Emily Flury "nostalgia porn"- nicely put


message 16: by Miriam (new)

Miriam mostly consisted of my friends and I goofing around and then accidentally wandering into an orgy and getting yelled at.

Like college!


message 17: by Eric (new)

Eric Miriam wrote: "mostly consisted of my friends and I goofing around and then accidentally wandering into an orgy and getting yelled at.

Like college!"


bwhahaha


message 18: by Libby (new)

Libby I can't wait to read it! Right now - I'm going through the top of my TBR list & I think you just helped me find my next pick! Thanks!


message 19: by Flannery (new)

Flannery I hope you like it, Libby! I thought it was lots of fun and such a quick read. There weren't any lags at all. Have fun!


message 20: by Eric (new)

Eric Did you see you can win a DeLorean! Which version of the book do you have, cause I had to pick up a print edition for this. https://www.youtube.com/w...more


message 21: by Flannery (new)

Flannery That link doesn't work:( I saw that the author is coming to Seattle in July so I'm totally going to go see him!


message 22: by Eric (new)

Eric Hmm, I think that was my bad, a copy and paste fail. Here's is the correct link. Do you own a physical copy? There's no way to win without it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xrGfQ...


message 23: by Ryan (new)

Ryan Kountz It sounds great. I will be adding it to my reading list almost entirely on the passion of your review. Thanks.


message 24: by Phillip (new)

Phillip Millman Your comment about nostalgia porn is prefect. I found it to be a well written book.


message 25: by Melissa Ann (new)

Melissa Ann Great review! Love the comparison to WOW & Second Life...it's exactly what I thought of as well!


message 26: by Marc (new)

Marc Great review.


message 27: by Julie (new)

Julie Nostalgia porn. I love it!


message 28: by Grey (new)

Grey Nostalgia porn. You called it. Not that there's anything wrong with that. It was *good* nostalgia porn.


message 29: by David (new)

David Avatar orgies? Are you kidding me? I guess the thing that kept me from getting interested in this book is that I found none of the OASIS experience slightly attractive. I don't play video games any more (although I HAVE spent hours breeding chocobos on ps1 when I was 15).


message 30: by Destinee (new)

Destinee Gant I agree. I am a little nerd. I love video games and this was a great book. I wasn't very familiar to the 1980's references but for me it didn't take away from the book. I really wish this stuff was real and I think that added to the excitement I had for the book. Great Read!


message 31: by Destinee (new)

Destinee Gant I agree. I am a little nerd. I love video games and this was a great book. I wasn't very familiar to the 1980's references but for me it didn't take away from the book. I really wish this stuff was real and I think that added to the excitement I had for the book. Great Read!


message 32: by Mark Hebwood (new)

Mark Hebwood Couldn't agree more. When he got to the second gate and had to play Black Tiger through on one coin, I was like "yea baby! I could do that, too, back in the day...". What fun! :-)


message 33: by Christina Maria (last edited Apr 30, 2015 05:17PM) (new)

Christina Maria The entire premise seemed too good to be true to me-and I had little motivation to suspend my disbelief. Halliday decides to leave his entire fortune and online sim (that pretty much runs the world) not to someone he trusts, but to whoever knows the most obscure '80s references. I think there was as much validation being given to Halliday as to the reader, which I think he cared about more than making sure the sixers taking control of his virtual wonderland and charging people for it.

I'm not surprised that it took five years for the contest to really begin (those clues were frustratingly cryptic), but I was surprised that everybody started figuring it out around the same time. Artemis was the first person to find the skull on Lusus, but conveniently can't beat the game so that Wade can show up and win about a week later. I'm also surprised that Halliday wanted schoolkids to solve the first clue, because a teenager is not the best candidate to have any degree of control over the lives of millions of people.

It's suspicious that Wade managed to beat the Sixers because they put in just as much dedication as he did and there were more of them. He was also less talented than Artemis evenly matched with Aech, but he had to win because he was the main character, and he was the main character because he was a white boy. (Would the story have been less compelling if Artemis or Aech won? I think not.)

I think that while this book provides validation for a niche audience, many other readers aren't going to be able wrap their heads around the entire world being obsessed with '80s culture in 2044.


message 34: by Mark Hebwood (new)

Mark Hebwood Christina Maria wrote: "many other readers aren't going to be able wrap their heads around the entire world being obsessed with '80s culture in 2044."

That may well be, and in fact would even seem likely. And yet, the book is made into a Hollywood movie (Spielberg directing), so the big entertainment business clearly decided that the story has potential to appeal to a wider audience. Like boy wizards have done before...

I always find it hard to understand why certain things catch on, and others don't. Still, I am a member of your niche audience, and I loved it!


message 35: by Christina Maria (new)

Christina Maria I can see the appeal for two specific audiences-since it's '80s references in YA packaging. I suspect that the second audience probably influenced the movie deal, and it caught on because teenagers love the idea of winning money and power through geekery.


message 36: by Mark Hebwood (new)

Mark Hebwood Actually, thinking about it in light of your comment, I wonder whether it may not be both these audiences that Hollywood sees as lucrative target groups. Guys who were teens in the 80s are now middle-aged family-people, and may love the nostalgia of getting back to a time in which they were still experiencing the promise of the future. And their kids are the ones who are, as you say, currently dreaming the dream. Plus there was recently a revival of 60s chique in fashion, so in two to three decades from now we may well go back to the 80s... The more I think about it, the more I am beginning to realise that these audiences are mainstream... soon I will claim people who did not like it are niche... :-)


message 37: by Christina Maria (new)

Christina Maria Most of the kids I've seen reading Ready Player One have parents born in the '60s and '70s, but there are people born in 1980 who have fifteen year old kids right now.

And of course there will always be teenagers who will sigh because they were born in the wrong decade and forget that that now they can enjoy the same music with superior technology (among other things). But that's not the same scale as the entire world, and the level of dedication/obsession the gunters put in is unusual even for geeks. Probably part of the reason the references are explained for the reader.

soon I will claim people who did not like it are niche... :-)
I'm pretty sure that would be most adults who lived through the '80s but have no particular fondness for it.


message 38: by Mark Hebwood (last edited May 03, 2015 04:32AM) (new)

Mark Hebwood I can only speak for myself - if you have seen my review, you know I am a child of the 80s - and so I loved the nostalgia trip. But if I had not "got" many of the references ("get" meaning "remember as things that carry sentimental value"), the book would have made less sense to me. Had the retrospective part of it been set in the 60s, I would have been like "yea wha'eva. This is so 20th Century!".

But the forward-looking leg is very much cutting-edge. Virtual reality immersion, biometric interfaces, augmented reality etc is all stuff that is coming, and has already led to the most astounding applications in the fields of medical science and AI. London is one of the hubs for the new tech, and again it may be because this buzz is happening just on my doorstep that I can relate to it as well. Granted, the book was not about this, but for me it carried both sweet memories of the past and the promise of the future.

Just explaining why I liked it so much, btw. So far, I haven't talked about the novel as such - if you can be bothered and care enough, you can always check out my review. Not that I am suggesting you do not have better things to do in your life :-) Kindest, Mark


message 39: by Christina Maria (last edited May 03, 2015 08:53AM) (new)

Christina Maria I wasn't nostalgic and I didn't quite buy into the way OASIS took over(especially since the way the world went to crap is so maddeningly vague). The action/adventure part of the book was what I liked best. I'll check out your review, thanks!


message 40: by Mark Hebwood (new)

Mark Hebwood I think you may be right. Experience shows that society is so diverse that it is hard for just one thing to take over completely. If you remember (sorry, the 80s again... cringe) the Sony walkman coming out, people were predicting that human communication would diminish. 30 years on, it hasnt - if anything, technology has enabled communication, and heightened diversity. We (us two) would not be chatting about this without the tool of social media, for example. "Second Life", which basically is the real-life OASIS, has as yet not taken off to be something lodged in mainstream consciousness (like facebook or twitter).
Thaks for your thoughts - interesting chat!
Mark


message 41: by Erik (new)

Erik Mark wrote: "I think you may be right. Experience shows that society is so diverse that it is hard for just one thing to take over completely. If you remember (sorry, the 80s again... cringe) the Sony walkman c..."

Think I might have to disagree here (with your agreeing with Christina). If you take the analogy of OASIS as "Second Life" (or WOW or any other MMO) then yes it appears false. But if you consider OASIS to represent the entire social media landscape (OR the Internet - which is how it's depicted in the book. OASIS & Internet are synonymous), then *THIS* very interaction is occurring in OASIS.

So to write something like, "I didn't quite buy into the way OASIS took over" in an area that is, essentially, part of our modern day OASIS strikes me as ironic.

The Internet & social media HAVE taken over and their 'market share' of social interaction is only increasing. That the author chooses to cast OASIS as a game-rich virtual landscape is just a matter of making it more exciting than having his characters sit at a keyboard and monitor.


message 42: by Christina Maria (new)

Christina Maria The internet and social media aren't a homogeneous force that has "taken over". While we a have a growing reliance on them, we expected different services owned by different people, and they have varying degrees of involvement in our lives.

This is nowhere near the same as OASIS-which not only has monopoly on entertainment but has the most respected education system and government. Anyone who can afford the gear uses it, and nobody decides that they simply don't want to play.

Personally, metaphor is not enough to suspend disbelief.


message 43: by Mark Hebwood (new)

Mark Hebwood Erik,
I think it may be a question of degree. OASIS is depicted in the book as an all-pervading escapist medium and, as Christina pointed out, an educational platform. You are right that the internet displays many of the features of the OASIS, in particular the ability of users to use "avatars" to step into a role. It also captures the addictive quality of video games (which is real, as anybody knows who has spent days in a row on a game - not that I speak from experience of course... :-)

But I see a crucial difference between the internet and the OASIS. The internet has grown into a platform that reflects, and fosters, social diversity. The fact that 90% of facebook timelines seem to consist of baby- and pet vids does not change that. People loved to exchange baby-photos before the internet, they are just using a different medium now to satisfy the same need. But look at the variety of ways in which the internet has enabled society: cloud-based music exchanges for artists (soundcloud for example), micro-finance, crowdfunding for projects, crowd-feedback sites, review sites, self-publishing technology for writers, MOOCs etc etc. The list goes on, and I see this diversity in focus rather than the dystopian danger.


message 44: by Erik (last edited Jan 10, 2016 10:45AM) (new)

Erik Christina you write, "The internet and social media aren't a homogeneous force that has 'taken over'."

The internet, homogenous or not, is a dominant force in our society. Amazon's market share is now greater than Walmart's. Netflix & other streaming services are slaying cable. Online news dominates newspapers. Our foremost presidential candidates all make heavy use of social media, e.g. twitter. Any high end private school worth its salt has integrated laptop/tablet usage into the classroom. Over 30% of college students are now enrolled online. There are over 70 billion text messages and over 190 billion e-mails sent per day. In Jan 2013, 59% of teens owned a smartphone. By Dec 2014, this had risen to 83.7%. US cellphone penetration is over 75% across all demographics and is expected to be at 95% or more by 2020. To top all this off with a personal experience: I have several students who take over a hundred selfies a day. That's how they stay in touch with their friends, especially boyfriend/girlfriend, some of whom live hundreds of miles away.

So when you write "Anyone who can afford the gear uses it..." well that's already true, isn't it? Though I question the latter statement, "...and nobody decides that they simply don't want to play." I mean, presumably there are TONS of people like that in RP1 (like Ogden Morrow or the residents of Wade's trailer park...), but for obvious reasons, they're not the focus. Not to mention, Wade didn't even begin his education in OASIS but in a real one first and only transferred later (so it's 'best' according to him, but then, of course).

Let's talk next about homogeneity.

Mark, I believe your argument is that OASIS isn't diverse, which strikes me as bizarre as you admit that OASIS isn't just a gaming platform but also an educational one. And presumably much more.

You write, "But look at the variety of ways in which the internet has enabled society: cloud-based music exchanges for artists (soundcloud for example), micro-finance, crowdfunding for projects, crowd-feedback sites, review sites, self-publishing technology for writers, MOOCs etc etc."

I don't see the difference. Does OASIS not offer these as well? We already KNOW it has MOOCs. Why wouldn't there be planets for music exchanges between artists? Or planets for philanthropic causes and crowd-funding? Or planets filled with libraries in which people can discuss books? What's stopping users from self-publishing their stories, written or otherwise? My copy of RP1 is on loan, so I can't cite it, but I feel certain it mentions this diversity, implicitly if not explicitly.

Of course, we mostly focus on the gaming aspects, but then, well, yeah, because that's what Wade is focused on.

To switch to Christina's argument, which I believe is that OASIS is too diverse, or has a monopoly on too many things. It's important to note that OASIS doesn't own all these services. It doesn't even own the education system. It's simply a platform/OS/API, like Android. On your Android phone, you can have apps for banking, social apps, gaming apps, reading apps, etc, etc. Does that make Android homogenous? And in terms of alternative platforms, there's really only Apple/iPhone. It's even worse for desktop or laptop OS, as Windows has over a 90% market share there.

As for the "most respected government," I honestly don't know what you're talking about there. OASIS is a government like World of Warcraft or Goodreads is a government. Yes there are rules and they are enforced, but I'd hardly call either one a 'government.' I mean, the very central conflict of RP1 stems from the fact that OASIS doesn't own or operate the ISP which delivers the OASIS content.

Christina, I respect your low rating for this and that you couldn't buy into the universe, but I don't agree that much suspension of disbelief is required. In all the ways that matter in RP1's exploration of the pitfalls and triumphs of a virtual society, OASIS is already fait accompli.


message 45: by Mark Hebwood (new)

Mark Hebwood Erik,

I must admit I am losing sight of what we are discussing a bit... Cline clearly gives his OASIS a dystopian tinge by portraying it as a monopolistic virtual platform - we do not hear of any competing educational systems besides the one it hosts, there are no other virtual games people seem to be playing.

Is your position that the internet is a medium that displays some of these dystopian features? Do you see the dangers of this technology more in focus than its potential benefits?

I just thought I'd ask so that we can chat constructively - very interesting stats, by the way.


message 46: by Erik (new)

Erik Mark wrote: "I must admit I am losing sight of what we are discussing a bit..."

Sure, to recap the discussion as I've interpreted it:

I began by disagreeing with the following statement by Christina: "I didn't quite buy into the way OASIS took over." & echoed by you: "Experience shows that society is so diverse that it is hard for just one thing to take over completely."

Specifically, I don't believe OASIS requires much to 'buy into.' My counter is that 'one thing' (the internet) is already taking over our society.

Christina's response seemed to cast doubt on the idea that the internet has taken over. For example, she wrote, "Anyone who can afford the gear uses it, and nobody decides that they simply don't want to play," implying that this isn't true of internet use today. I responded to that first with some statistics.

Primarily, however, you both suggested I was in error to treat the Internet and OASIS as analogues. Christina said: "This is nowhere near the same as OASIS" and you said: "But I see a crucial difference between the internet and OASIS."

I disagreed, and I believe you're both in error in your understanding of the author's portrayal of OASIS.

For example you write, "we do not hear of any competing educational systems besides the one it hosts." You mean besides the real life one that Wade attended first and the program from which he (falsely) got a computer science degree? But actually this question just strikes me as a categorical error. It'd be like if you pointed out the huge variety of MOOCs and online degrees and such and I said to you, "Yeah but they're all hosted on the same internet using the same TCP/IP protocols and all navigated using a keyboard and mouse. So there's no competing educational systems." You'd (rightly) reply that's nonsense - that the Internet is a simply a collection of shared protocols and navigated by similar I/O devices. So is OASIS.

Or you write, "there are no other virtual games people seem to be playing." This also reveals our fundamental difference in how we view OASIS. I see the meta-game, its MMO wrapping, are relatively minor. I assumed - and I'm fairly certain Wade explicitly states this - that the majority of OASIS users don't give a crap about the MMO wrapping. (Obviously, it's important to gunters though).

Instead, OASIS is primarily a platform. If we're talking gaming, we're best off comparing it to steam. Steam has an inventory. It has levels. Its gaming 'wrapping' is obviously nowhere near as extensive as the one in OASIS, but it's there. But would it make any sense to say, "But compared to steam, there are no other virtual games people seem to be playing"? Not really. Steam is a gateway/platform for other games. So is OASIS. That's what all those planets are, even if many ARE there simply as part of the Meta MMO. This is made explicitly clear in Wade's description of OASIS and is explicitly demonstrated in Wade's visit to an arcade located within.

I answer your two queries in greater depth within my own review, but to summarize:

Wade's navigation through OASIS is meant to bring into focus both the pitfalls and triumphs of our internet age. The pitfalls being the loneliness, the advertising obsession, the anonymity, the deceptiveness of social media. The triumphs being how it breaks down barriers and how it allows us to forge an identity for ourselves freed from the constraints of physical attractiveness, race, and (biological) gender. Not to mention awesome access to information, instant communication, & so on.

I'm quite certain I can't answer whether I see the dangers of technology as ascendant over its benefits. In discussing science, Richard Feynman once quoted a Buddhist monk who said: "To every man is given the key to the gates of heaven. The same key opens the gates of hell." So it is with the internet (and OASIS) - it depends on how you use it, doesn't it?


message 47: by Mark Hebwood (new)

Mark Hebwood Erik,

I am glad I asked. Your two penultimate paragraphs are particularly poignant.

Penultimate paragraph: Well said - I think that is an excellent analysis. I still think the dystopian aspects of the technology are in focus in Cline's book, but I think he wrote it primarily as a light adventure novel, and the story wears whatever it offers in sociological commentary lightly.

Last paragraph: Precisely. That is what I think.

But I am still confused by the way you present your case. You say that in your view, the internet has already 'taken over' society. The use of the phrase 'take over' suggests you see the internet as a technology that has started to dominate society in a negative way. The way in which you introduce the statistical evidence certainly seems to support this reading of your statement. You liken the internet to the OASIS, which in turn suggests that you think the fictional platform has done the same to Ernest's fictional society.

And yet, you then develop your thoughts by pointing out the presumed diversity of OASIS, and, by extension, of the internet. It is almost as if the second and final paragraphs were written by different people (paraphrasing: 'the internet has taken over society' vs 'the user defines whether the internet is a good thing or a bad thing').

I am just mentioning this to illustrate why I was (am still) confused where you stand. Still, I am looking forward to seeing your review.

P.S.
For example you write, "we do not hear of any competing educational systems besides the one it hosts." You mean besides the real life one that Wade attended first and the program from which he (falsely) got a computer science degree?

Ah yes - forgot that :-)

I'm quite certain I can't answer whether I see the dangers of technology as ascendant...

Just spotted the absence of the word "this" in front of technology. In my question (2nd para 2nd question msg 45) I am asking specifically whether the dangers of the internet are more in focus for you than its benefits, I am not referencing technology in general.


message 48: by Erik (new)

Erik Mark,

You wrote: "I think he wrote it primarily as a light adventure novel, and the story wears whatever it offers in sociological commentary lightly."

I agree. It's pretty clearly a YA adventure novel, though I think the sociological elements are absolutely essential to the human 'heart' of the novel. Would this story work without the existential loneliness Wade faces as a result of his addiction to OASIS, in particular how it gives him a sense of purpose and a desperate edge to his romance with Artemis?

I prefer this novel structure - the draw of a real, entertaining story with an elective depth. I think novels are best as entertaining stories that can - if the readers have the motivational and intellectual wherewithal - serve as gateways to larger discussions. Literature as a Trojan horse, if you will.

With regards to your confusion, you write: "The use of the phrase 'take over' suggests you see the internet as a technology that has started to dominate society in a negative way."

I chose the phrase 'take over' because that's what you and Christina used. I didn't intend its negative connotations - but really, how few synonyms are there for 'dominate' which do not contain a negative connotation?

Beyond that, however, I'm genuinely confused where you're getting the negativity from, unless you think I'm operating from a conservative perspective in which change is inherently bad. Well, I'm not. You cite my introduction to the statistics, but I don't see it. I used the word 'slay' for netflix over cable, but that's not a negative if you consider cable an outmoded dragon in need of slaying, as I do.

I don't even consider the monopolistic aspects of OASIS (or the Internet) to be dystopian. Rather I believe the dystopian elements arise from Wade's particular situation. He's so poor and socially inept that he can only find expression within the virtual environment of OASIS. RP1 is a story, not of the evolution of OASIS, but of Wade.

So to repeat, trying to be absolutely clear: Wade's usage of OASIS - and those environmental factors (e.g. IOI's corporate greed) which push him into this usage - are what's dystopian, not OASIS itself. That OASIS/internet lends itself to 'real world'/meatspace isolation and atrophied meatspace social skills doesn't make it automatically dystopian, to my way of thinking. I'm rather progressive, even radical, here - I don't consider meatspace inherently superior to inkspace or virtualspace. In this respect, I'm ambivalent about RP1's penultimate message.

As for my exclusion of the word "this," I was obviously discussing the topic at hand - internet technology.

My apologies for the confusion and thanks for encouraging me to clarify! The topic of society & the internet is a complex and wonderful one. I, personally, find the challenges of unifying virtual & meatspace to be fascinating. Also, my review is already written. Have at it, if you so desire.


message 49: by Mark Hebwood (new)

Mark Hebwood My apologies for the confusion and thanks for encouraging me to clarify!

Not at all, Erik. All clear now. Turns out we are not really in disagreement about the internet after all - I sometimes think it would be easier to sit down in a pub having a chat, but of course we would not be chatting at all were it not for GR.

Many thanks for clarifying. Now that I know how you use the expression "take over", I agree entirely. The internet has matured into a pervasive platform for all kinds of communication and enablement. This is not in itself good or bad, and I would argue that the internet has become a fantastic resource, if used responsibly.

An analogy, perhaps, of another dominant technology is 'writing'. There is no aspect of human life that is not somehow impacted by it. Road signs, user-manuals, instruction panels etc, the list is endless. Writing is inextricably woven into the fabric of society, and I would argue society has become the better for it, even though the technology can be used to record statements of people like Donald Trump :-).

Another technology that has come to dominate is 'coding'. No car would run without it, I would clearly not be able to communicate this opinion to you without it, the lift in my building would not work, I could not watch television, operate my washing machine, or take the train to work. I am guessing that soon an inability to code will be similar to being illiterate (somebody else said this, I cannot remember who it was, but I find this statement evocative).

I must admit I am happy to live in a world like this. Sure, there are problems, but there are always problems. The current form of the internet seems to be merely the start. I expect this type of technology to enable humanity like few others we have seen before.


message 50: by Jaksen (last edited Feb 19, 2016 05:41PM) (new)

Jaksen Did nothing for me, though your review is interesting.

Possibly my disinterest comes from the fact that while all you 'young'uns' were doing your thing I was raising children and teaching school.

But we did do video games. We had Nintendo - which my friends called Nine-tendo - long before most of my own students did. And the wonderful VTR (or video TAPE recorder.) We spent hundreds of dollars on the newest games and game systems and I'd go to school and tell my students what games to buy.

All the same the book felt pretty stale to me, perhaps because I regard those years as sort of stale. Of all the decades I have known, the 80's are my least fav. Don't know why. Just is.

But bravo to those who found something special in this book.


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