Stephen M’s review of After Dark > Likes and Comments

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message 1: by Ian (new)

Ian Heidin[+]Fisch Fantastic thoughts, Stephen.
I will come back to your review when I re-read the novel.
I think there is a bag of themes revolving around light, dark, eyes, cameras, mirrors, looking, watching, gazing, observation, blindness, sleep, unconsciousness, dreams.
They're all there in his work, and they're all there in your review.


message 2: by Stephen M (new)

Stephen M gosh, thank you Ian. And I agree there seem to be all these themes that roll around in Murakami's writing. I'm very interested to read more of his stuff to get a better grasp on it all. Do you have any favorites of his?


message 3: by Ian (new)

Ian Heidin[+]Fisch You seem to have read a number already that I would have recommended, apart from Hard-Boiled Egg.
Remember that IQ84 comes out soon, so I might do some re-reading before then.
Rather than read Hard-Boiled Egg, if I were you, I'd focus on re-reading something and refining your ideas about Murakami generally.
It's bound to come in handy.
Also, have a look around at some other reviews, both pro and con.
I would be interested in a discussion group when you decide what you want to do.


message 4: by Stephen M (new)

Stephen M Yes, a discussion group would be great. I'd like that. I know I want to re-read Wind-Up bird, I knew that from the moment I finished it. I'm not sure about re-reading Norwegian Wood. It's a good book, but I don't think there is much else that would help me with Murakami's writing overall. I also want to read at least one other before IQ84, probably Hard-Boiled Egg or Kafka on the Shore.


message 5: by Ian (new)

Ian Heidin[+]Fisch This review is still fantastic. My original like seems to have disappeared to the other side, so I've re-liked it.


message 6: by Stephen M (new)

Stephen M Thanks again. I'm quite flattered, but mostly embarrassed that I misspelled "two" "to". No matter how many times I correct a review, the mistakes still slip by me.

Sort of like Murakami's ideas and your disappearing likes.


message 7: by Ian (new)

Ian Heidin[+]Fisch If you delete message 6, nobody will ever no.


message 8: by Stephen M (new)

Stephen M But then I'll feel like a fraud. And most people will have also noticed my misuse of "it's" instead of "its".

You'd think I'd never taken an english class. For shame.


message 9: by Stephen M (new)

Stephen M Ian wrote: "If you delete message 6, nobody will ever no."

You no, I actually didn't notice that at first. You sneaky bastard. I should have nown better.


message 10: by Ian (new)

Ian Heidin[+]Fisch All I can say in my own defence is "no thyself":

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/No_Thyself


message 11: by Stephen M (last edited Feb 03, 2012 12:48AM) (new)

Stephen M Wow that was an obscure reference. I best come up with something just as good. This is really stressing me out, I better pump up the valuum.


message 12: by Ian (new)

Ian Heidin[+]Fisch Pump up the volume on this (there are two degrees of separation via M.A.R.R.S.):

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-0vWnZ...


message 13: by Stephen M (new)

Stephen M Sound bites of Golden Eye N64? I can dig. Well it's getting late, I better go to sleep.


message 14: by Ian (new)

Ian Heidin[+]Fisch Here's something to go to sleep with:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6yoR7f...


message 15: by Ian (new)

Ian Heidin[+]Fisch When you awake, you have to tell me the link between "no thyself" and Dostoyevsky. And no asking spenke.


message 16: by s.penkevich (new)

s.penkevich It is like a dream where you wake up and can't really describe anything that has happened to yourself, yet you are undeniably left with a deep, pensive attitude superseding all of the quotidian aspects of the morning.
That is a great description for Murakami. You keep reminding me I need to pick up another of his books.


message 17: by s.penkevich (new)

s.penkevich Stephen M wrote: "Ian wrote: "If you delete message 6, nobody will ever no."

You no, I actually didn't notice that at first. You sneaky bastard. I should have nown better."


Ha, every time i write a review I immedietly post it and for days look back and think, damn i need to review


message 18: by Jenn(ifer) (new)

Jenn(ifer) this was my first Murakami!


message 19: by Stephen M (new)

Stephen M Nice! That's an interesting one to start with. It's quite different from all his other stuff.


message 20: by Jenn(ifer) (new)

Jenn(ifer) He totally sucked me in though!


message 21: by Stephen M (new)

Stephen M I was thinking of revisiting this one. It does suck one in quite well. Have you read any other Murakami? What's your favorite?


message 22: by Jenn(ifer) (new)

Jenn(ifer) Yes! I've read most of 'em. The only ones I think I have left are the short story collections, 'Hard-boiled...' and his first 2.

My favorite is 'A Wild Sheep Chase.' And yes, I realize I'm probably the only one who has picked that as her favorite Murakami, but I stand by my choice!


message 23: by Stephen M (new)

Stephen M Well good for you! I couldn't quite get into that one but it had a lot of interesting ideas nonetheless.

You've got to read Hard-Boiled. A close second after Wind-Up for me.


message 24: by Megha (new)

Megha (Jenn)ifer wrote: "Yes! I've read most of 'em. The only ones I think I have left are the short story collections, 'Hard-boiled...' and his first 2.

My favorite is 'A Wild Sheep Chase.' And yes, I realize I'm probab..."


'A Wild Sheep Chase' is a close-to-favorite of mine.


message 25: by Jenn(ifer) (new)

Jenn(ifer) A Wild Sheep Chase' is a close-to-favorite of mine.

yessssss!


message 26: by Jenn(ifer) (new)

Jenn(ifer) Stephen M wrote: "Well good for you! I couldn't quite get into that one but it had a lot of interesting ideas nonetheless.

You've got to read Hard-Boiled. A close second after Wind-Up for me."


I certainly will. Gotta savor them. After reading 'After Dark' I started devouring Murakami after Murakami, then I realized: if I read 'em all now, there won't be any left!


message 27: by Sara (new)

Sara this was my first time reading anything by Murakami as well, and well, I'm in love with his style. I have often thought that myself- that I should write down my dreams as they are often strange, visceral and vivid. perhaps i will.


message 28: by Stephen M (new)

Stephen M Great to hear! I'm so off and on with Murakami, but when he's good, he is just fabulous. I'd recommend Wind-Up Bird Chronicle if you're interested in furthering your reading of him. That one is a masterpiece.


message 29: by Zenmoon (new)

Zenmoon Loved hearing about the obvious mind-expanding aspects of this particular Murakami read for you Stephen. And enjoyed all the subsequent comments. Am a big fan and had to dissect 'Wind up' for a Masters assignment. There's just no-one else like him for me. In a way out class all his own. I am almost through 'Hard-boiled wonderland and the end of the world'. Oh for even a fraction of his ideas. But reading this today has inspired me all over. Back to the M reading pile ...


message 30: by Stephen M (new)

Stephen M Oh, wow! Wind-Up for a master's assignment? That sounds exciting. Care to explain what things you talked about for it?

Whenever I read Murakami, I get the impulse to start writing long papers on it to try to piece together the pile of broken puzzle pieces that are his novels.

Hope you enjoy Hard-Boiled. That's my second favorite after Wind-Up.


message 31: by Jenn(ifer) (new)

Jenn(ifer) I got 'Hard-Boiled' for my birthday!! (not that I have time to read it)


message 32: by Stephen M (new)

Stephen M Nice! That is one of the most unique of Murakami's that I've read. It's part of what makes it so good.


message 33: by Ian (new)

Ian Heidin[+]Fisch 'Hard-Boiled' was my first. It was the egg, which might make "The Wind-up Bird" the chicken.


message 34: by Stephen M (new)

Stephen M Ian wrote: "'Hard-Boiled' was my first. It was the egg, which might make "The Wind-up Bird" the chicken."

Well said. Although, the bird was first for me. So obviously the chicken comes before the egg.


message 35: by Kent (new)

Kent Just about to start this, and reading your review, I was thrilled to see someone else use the same analogy I use to describe reading Murakami as like waking from a dream. At the end of Wind-Up Bird, I felt as though I had awoken from a profound and exciting dream, but couldn't quite get a grip on what had happened, like a fast-fading memory. Sputnik, again. The adventure continues...


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