Briana’s review of The Catcher in the Rye > Likes and Comments

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message 1: by Sarah (new)

Sarah i think this the whole truth of the book... this book should never have made it on the classic list or the required reading... you have stated my opinion of this book more eliquently than i ever could. thank you


message 2: by Marco (new)

Marco You guys must be very young. I don't see why you would want to slash your wrists after reading this, I hope you didn't. After reading it, I wanted to give my little sister a big hug, and try to appreciate people and be more open.


message 3: by Briana (new)

Briana Patterson Marco wrote: "You guys must be very young. I don't see why you would want to slash your wrists after reading this, I hope you didn't. After reading it, I wanted to give my little sister a big hug, and try to a..."

When I talked about slashing wrists, I was being facetious. I appreciate people just fine and I don't need an angst-filled book to do it. As far as age goes, why would I start to like it more when I'm older?


message 4: by Marco (new)

Marco If you think you don't need to appreciate people anymore than you do, then you don't understand love. Love is unending, one can deepen it infinitely. And it's not that you need an "angst-filled" book to do it, but delving into the depths of suffering forces us to look to the virtues within us to overcome it, and grow the compassion within us to really understand our suffering and that of others. It doesn't have to come from a book, but a book is a good way to grow because all it is is concentrated "frozen" thought.


message 5: by Marco (new)

Marco Oh and I don't mean to sound high and mighty, it's just that I really do believe that.


message 6: by Briana (last edited Aug 31, 2009 02:34PM) (new)

Briana Patterson Marco wrote: "If you think you don't need to appreciate people anymore than you do, then you don't understand love. Love is unending, one can deepen it infinitely. And it's not that you need an "angst-filled" ..."

Okay hold on before you start writing a huge poem here about love. I am not saying I can't appreciate people or love people - or don't want to. If you like reading about depression and hardship that is your prerogative. If you feel it deepens your understanding of people, great.

If you compare this book to a non-fiction account of something like, say, Night by Elie Wiesel, Catcher in the Rye falls flat.

I would also prefer that you stop making broad, sweeping assumptions about me based on the fact that I disagree with you. 1) I'm not very young. 2) I didn't say I didn't want to appreciate people more, just that I didn't need to read a book like this to do it.


message 7: by Marco (new)

Marco I didn't know I was so poetic :)

And you're totally right, I made way too many assumptions. You've given this a lot of thought, and I shouldn't jump to conclusions. And I haven't read night, it might be better, but that doesn't make catcher bad, for me at least.



message 8: by Wendy (new)

Wendy Terry "My God -- JD Salinger is basically Judy Blume with more cursing." (Or to be completely fair, I guess that should be worded -- "My God, Judy Blume is basically JD Salinger with Jews and menstruation."

Love that! =D


message 9: by Hugh (new)

Hugh Beaumont Forcing this book on public school students was some kind of psy-op.


message 10: by Cosmic (new)

Cosmic Arcata The Catcher in the Rye is about WW2. It is a story within a story. Holden (which is the name of a car) is just a vehicle to "understand" the WW2. See my review. When you understand that Salinger couldn't say what he knew about this war so he wrote it as a children's book... Just like Felix Salten in Bambi (not the Disney version, which is probably why Salinger didn't get his published.

Salinger tells you this is nit a David Copperfield story. So don't read it like it is about Holden. Hint: look at the first page of David Copperfield to understand "Caiulfields" name.

I hope you will reread it again. This time when you get to the Merry go round play the music Salinger said was playing, and see if that makes sense or if he is using this book to tell you about money, power and war.


message 11: by Hugh (new)

Hugh Beaumont Wendy wrote: ""My God -- JD Salinger is basically Judy Blume with more cursing." (Or to be completely fair, I guess that should be worded -- "My God, Judy Blume is basically JD Salinger with Jews and menstruatio..."

They're both Jews, no? Judy Sussman?


message 12: by Hugh (new)

Hugh Beaumont Cosmic wrote: "The Catcher in the Rye is about WW2. It is a story within a story. Holden (which is the name of a car) is just a vehicle to "understand" the WW2. See my review. When you understand that Salinger co..."

Where do you get this stuff?


message 13: by Kacielowrey (new)

Kacielowrey I think if this book makes you sad then you're reading it wrong. Sure, Holden's angsty and mean, but nothing bad happens to him. In fact, the events of Catcher in the Rye are nothing but positive for Holden Caulfield, because he grows. This book doesn't show teenagers that this anger that Holden holds is valid and normal; in fact, it shows the opposite: that whatever is bringing you down can be overcome. The majority of book, Holden's behavior is guided by his obsession with genuineness and his obsession with innocence. Both of these ideas stem from the death of his brother Allie. Holden feels at least in part guilty(though he has no reason to) over the death of his brother, and one of the main characteristics of his brother that he focuses on is innocence. Holden can't project Allie's red hair on everyone he cares about (though Holden's love for his red hat may stem from this connection), but he can project his innocence, which is why Holden wants so badly to protect Pheobe and Jane. At the end of the book, Holden realizes that he can't protect them forever, symbolized by him letting Pheobe ride the carousel. However, the greater point in this is that Holden is letting go of Allie. He accepts that Pheobe has to grow up, even though Allie never got to. He gives up his red hat. At the end of the book, Holden moves on.

Though I don't think most teenagers have lost a younger brother, most people, regardless of their age, have something hanging over their head that guides their actions in a negative way, whether the realize it or not. The Catcher in the Rye is the story of Holden letting go of this negative influence, and it should inspire and guide other people to do the same. Holden may be a teenager, but this book isn't just about teenagers. It's about everyone whose ever had trouble letting go of something in their past, and this book is liberating, not depressing.


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