☯Bettie☯’s review of Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil > Likes and Comments

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message 1: by Wanda (new)

Wanda Lovely pic. Magnolias are glorious to see. We have many bushes/trees growing along the side of the road and they take my breath away each time I see them.


message 2: by ☯Bettie☯ (new)

☯Bettie☯ Wanda wrote: "Lovely pic. Magnolias are glorious to see. We have many bushes/trees growing along the side of the road and they take my breath away each time I see them."

Like the glow bug on that low petal. I have a magnolia in my garden and the very first green leaf unrolled a fraction today.

:O)


message 3: by Laura (new)

Laura thanks Bettie, they're plenty of copies at bookmooch


message 4: by Wanda (new)

Wanda Made that pic my new background - many thanks!


Lady  ~☆ Alice Rowhedge glow bug on a low petal? what eagle eye vision you have!


message 6: by ☯Bettie☯ (last edited May 14, 2011 01:21AM) (new)

☯Bettie☯

Twelve miles east of Savannah, beneath shallow layers of sand and water, an abandoned 7,600 pound nuclear bomb is biding its time, waiting to rain death and destruction on the southern Atlantic coastline. If not disarmed, perhaps some sleepy Sunday morning an atomic fireball will erupt on picturesque Wassaw Sound, shooting along nearby heavily travelled Interstate 80 with the force of a hundred hurricanes, instantly vaporizing tidal wetlands, and brutally fire-storming a vibrant, thriving metropolis—women, children, more than 200,000 people instantly incinerated—into a crumbling, deserted heap of radioactive rubble.
A cold, calculated act of terrorism? Not quite. It's simply that the United States Air Force isn't in the habit of picking up after itself.


Read this full story here


message 7: by Hayes (new)

Hayes Bettie wrote: " Twelve miles east of Savannah..."

Your link aint linkin' Bettie! What an awful story!


message 8: by ☯Bettie☯ (new)

☯Bettie☯ Hah - you are right. Good spot. The geezer who wrote this is called F Dungan http://www.fdungan.com/duke.htm

Not so very sure about validity!!


message 10: by Hayes (new)

Hayes They are evil!


message 11: by ☯Bettie☯ (new)

☯Bettie☯ Hayes wrote: "They are evil!"

Thanks to our very own Georgia Peach, Wandaful, here is a walking guide to the squares of Savannah

http://citywalkingguide.com/squaresof...


message 12: by ☯Bettie☯ (new)

☯Bettie☯ Now for the film. I am looking forward to the scenery here.


message 13: by Wanda (new)

Wanda Hello Dear Miss Bettie. The scenery will be beautiful!!


message 14: by ☯Bettie☯ (last edited May 17, 2011 04:41AM) (new)

☯Bettie☯ Wanda wrote: "Hello Dear Miss Bettie. The scenery will be beautiful!!"

I only intended to watch a snippet tonight but the film was outstanding. Superbly done by Eastwood, and with brilliant casting. Better than the book and fact is definitely stranger than fiction.


message 15: by ☯Bettie☯ (new)

☯Bettie☯ Wanda wrote: "Hello Dear Miss Bettie. The scenery will be beautiful!!"

I love the way Southerners use 'Miss' to keep the women feeling young and frisky; that coupled with 'what would you like to drink' would suit me just fine.


Susanna - Censored by GoodReads I suspect that most Savannah natives are ambivalent about the book. Tourism has tripled since Berendt (a New Yorker, I believe) published it. There are tours (I've taken one) that point out everything mentioned in the book, and dozens of stores that sell replicas of the statue on the cover.
Savannah, though, is a lovely city with a stock of Victorian as well as 18th century homes and is easier to visit than Charleston, which is tourist central.


message 17: by Susanna - Censored by GoodReads (last edited May 18, 2011 02:22PM) (new)

Susanna - Censored by GoodReads Snort! Above statement is actually from my mom, who seems to be signed in as me!

Savannah, though, is absolutely lovely.


Susanna - Censored by GoodReads Bettie wrote: "Wanda wrote: "Hello Dear Miss Bettie. The scenery will be beautiful!!"

I love the way Southerners use 'Miss' to keep the women feeling young and frisky; that coupled with 'what would you like t..."


Heh. Have you run into the southern "Aunt" phenomenon?


message 19: by ☯Bettie☯ (new)

☯Bettie☯ Susanna wrote: "Snort! Above statement is actually from my mom, who seems to be signed in as me!

Savannah, though, is absolutely lovely."


Well ladies, I must admit the film has imbued me with an urge to have a ramble around and feed the squirrels.

What gives with the southern 'aunt'?

Does anyone still believe in voodoo nowadays? I thought that is now confined to Haiti. See how much I don't know!? haha


message 20: by Wanda (new)

Wanda Hello Dear Miss Bettie! I have not run into the "aunt" thing. Is it a Southern cultural thing? I will have to ask about "aunt" at work tomorrow (all the ladies there are true Southern belles!) or as they call themselves - G.R.I.T.S. (girls raised in the south).

Yes, Miss Bettie, people still believe and even practice voodoo. Our neighbor in Pennsylvania is originally from Georgia (funny that!) and she often will drive the 15 hours back and forth to Georgia to visit her "roots" doctor when she feels that someone has slighted her or caused her to experience bad happenings in her life. She says that she has not found a good northern "roots" doctor whom she can trust so, she feels safer and happier driving back and forth. Can you imagine?

Hugs,
Wanda


message 21: by ☯Bettie☯ (last edited May 19, 2011 03:08AM) (new)

☯Bettie☯

Thank you for filling me in. I find it all rather scary, not because I believe in anything supernatural but that others do. How do they not frighten themselves to death? And what about the chickens? haha

I love big discussions like this; everyone from all over puts in a twopenn'th of information and a real picture emerges.

I love the GRITS thing and please say a warm hello to all your new work mates. xx


message 22: by Hayes (new)

Hayes Bettie wrote: "...not because I believe in anything supernatural but that others do."

Got everything squared away for the 21st?
The end of the world is nigh!


I'd never heard the GRITS either! funny!


message 23: by ☯Bettie☯ (last edited May 19, 2011 03:17AM) (new)

☯Bettie☯ Got everything squared away for the 21st?

I'm a Kali and Maya kinda gal me, so I have got until next year before my particular version of the end of the world kicks in.

:O)

ETA - how about you, Hayes, got your clean underwear on?


message 24: by Hayes (new)

Hayes Bettie wrote: " ... got your clean underwear on? "

My maker will have to see me in the buff... laundry day is the 22!


message 25: by ☯Bettie☯ (last edited May 19, 2011 03:20AM) (new)

☯Bettie☯ Hayes wrote: "Bettie wrote: " ... got your clean underwear on? "

My maker will have to see me in the buff... laundry day is the 22!"


coffee/screen. Just think of the money saved on washing powder, and no more ironing. Bargain.


message 26: by ☯Bettie☯ (new)

☯Bettie☯ M just shouted over 'what is this underwear you speak of; what IS underwear'

hahaha


message 27: by Hayes (new)

Hayes Bettie wrote: "M just shouted over 'what is this underwear you speak of; what IS underwear'

hahaha"





message 28: by Wanda (new)

Wanda Maybe it's just me; but, I sort of like the 1900 panties. They are roomy, non-binding and just plain look comfy.


message 29: by Hayes (new)

Hayes I so agree, Wanda dear! "Bum floss" is not for me.


message 30: by ☯Bettie☯ (new)

☯Bettie☯ non-binding

bind as in gluey?


message 31: by Jeannette (new)

Jeannette This has been one of the more enjoyable book discussions I've read lately! Just when I was worried about all of my guests missing the Grad Party on 5/22, I realize that my undies are stuck in the 70s. :P


Susanna - Censored by GoodReads The southern "aunt" thing - your parents' close friends, who are not relatives, will be called "Aunt" and "Uncle." When I was growing up, my friend Jennifer called my grandparents "Aunt Frances" and "Uncle H.L.", for example.

I, myself, grew up with an "Aunt Ann" and an "Uncle Maurice."


Susanna - Censored by GoodReads Jeanette - the 70s look comfy to me!


message 34: by Jeannette (new)

Jeannette Susanna wrote: "Jeanette - the 70s look comfy to me!"

Better than that little turquoise strip on the line! lol


We have friends from Mississippi whose kids called us Miss Jeannette and Mr. Andreas. It sounds so sweet.


message 35: by Miriam (new)

Miriam It's a Chinese "thing" also -- all older relatives and friends of the family, or the parents of one's friends, are called "Auntie" and "Uncle". I grew up in a predominantly Asian neighborhood and have a very difficult time calling people such as my boyfriend's parents by their first names. It just feels rude.


Susanna - Censored by GoodReads Yeah, my "Aunt Lilmar Sue" is actually my father's first cousin.


message 37: by Wanda (new)

Wanda Bettie wrote: "non-binding

bind as in gluey?"


Bind as in "cuts into my middle when I am eating" or "sneaks up my butt like a band of wild Indians."


message 38: by Jeannette (new)

Jeannette Wanda wrote: "Bettie wrote: "non-binding

bind as in gluey?"

Bind as in "cuts into my middle when I am eating" or "sneaks up my butt like a band of wild Indians.""


Wow! That is something I hope never to experience! lol


message 39: by Hayes (new)

Hayes Wanda wrote: "... like a band of wild Indians.""

Indian underwear!! Haven't heard/used that expression in donkey's years!


message 40: by ☯Bettie☯ (new)

☯Bettie☯ hahaha - the things I learn here


message 41: by Jeannette (new)

Jeannette btw -- just how long is a donkey year? (I thought at first you wrote donkey's ears!)

Happy Friday, everyone! :D


message 42: by ☯Bettie☯ (last edited May 20, 2011 07:25AM) (new)

☯Bettie☯ Going back to the 'aunt' thing - yes, that was prevalent in my young years. Many aunts and uncles that were friends of the family were deemed important enough to be quasi relations. It was a nice thing I think.


message 43: by Hayes (last edited May 20, 2011 06:28AM) (new)

Hayes S has a few "adopted" Aunts and Uncles, as did my brother and I. I think it's nice too.

Jeannette... truth to tell, I don't know. Will have to go Google it.. brb.

ETA: you may be right J, looks like this one says it's ears, not years: http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/do...


message 44: by Jeannette (new)

Jeannette lol! You can google just about anything....

My daughter calls one of our friends "uncle" but we seem to reserve the title for our German friends.


message 45: by Jeannette (new)

Jeannette The whole rhyming slang thing, Hayes! I've read about it before, but never quite understood it. I think I may have seen it used in one of Terry Pratchett's books. Now I'll be off to the Internets to do some looking....


message 46: by Miriam (new)

Miriam It is definitely "in a donkey's years" in the US.


Susanna - Censored by GoodReads The phrase about livestock and ears that I'm familiar with is "talk the ears off a donkey."


message 48: by Jeannette (last edited May 20, 2011 12:00PM) (new)

Jeannette We use "talk the hind leg off a donkey". :)


message 49: by Susanna - Censored by GoodReads (last edited May 20, 2011 03:31PM) (new)

Susanna - Censored by GoodReads You hear that one too, here.


message 50: by Jeannette (new)

Jeannette My sister is in Oklahoma now; maybe that's where she picked it up. She's always teasing the kids to look for any 3-legged donkeys.


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