Worldreader

By Goodreads Staff | Published Jul 30, 2012 03:12PM



Forget shipping, handling, and book donation drives—this nonprofit is changing the world digitally, one e-book at a time.

The U.S. and European organization Worldreader provides free e-readers and e-books to students in sub-Saharan Africa. The lower cost of e-book delivery means that classrooms can enjoy greater book selection. Though most of the available books are written by African authors, partnerships with publishers worldwide contribute a well-rounded list of titles in both local and international languages.

Worldreader has supplied more than 196,000 e-books to date. The goal for 2013 is 1 million!



Tags: 2012-august and do-good

Comments (showing 1-12 of 12) (12 new)

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message 1: by Barak (new)

Barak Kassar great great org ... i am glad to see them pop up in goodreads


Simon (Highwayman) If only Bezos was behind these initiatives he could send thousands of older kindles and really spread the word


message 3: by Dee (new)

Dee I believe there is a pilot program for providing kindles in africa - I was reading about it recently - but they found that there was a high rate of breakage which was something that they were taking into consideration

I also just saw that the State Dept is looking at contracting with amazon to provide kindles to various embassy's throughout the world


message 4: by Gloria (new)

Gloria Masitsa I live in Kenya and I think this is a great idea. Am sure many students would be thrilled.


message 5: by Lord Nouda (last edited Aug 06, 2012 03:10AM) (new)

Lord Nouda Personally I'd rather have them receive actual books than ebooks/kindles. That stuff ain't cheap. Amazon sells them at a loss and frankly, for that kind of price we'd be off sending them our second-hand books. For the price of a Kindle, they can easily get 40-50 old books or 10 new ones.

eReaders are fragile as hell. I don't think giving them to a bunch of kids who could never have afforded them is the way to go about it. Not to mention DRM in itself. That kinda of excess is stiffing the developed world's freedom, what do you think it'd do to a 3rd World Country that can't afford the price of an ebook in the first place? You give them a full priced DRMed up to the balls ebook that can't be transferred and then what?

Books on the other hand, will last for decades and future generations will still be able to enjoy them.


message 6: by Leo8 (new)

Leo8 There is something magical about getting a new, high-tech, e-book reader in your hands in the world where most of the things that you own are second hand. It just might awaken curiosity of a child enough to start reading, learning and sort of awakening to figure out smarter ways of doing things. Consider that, from these children's point of view, education is a waste of time. It does not directly result in food nor money.

I have another question: What kinds of books might help these children?

I have gone through the list of featured books that Worldreader makes available for them and the only science books are basic natural sciences for primary school. Wouldn't it be also very significant to show them what can be built using the resources and the tools at their disposal? If you were a child in Africa, wouldn't you want to learn from something like Make magazine, old DIY magazines, Scout handbooks, and even Peter Norton's PC Repair Manual?


message 7: by Leigh-ann (new)

Leigh-ann They should see if they can partner with amazon. I get a lot of my books for free from them. They have daily deals of free books, that are only free for the day, but you "buy" them in the allotted period and their yours forever.


message 8: by [deleted user] (new)

And the back woods people may not get electricity or they can't afford to recharge their readers. Donate both kinds but more paper books. And the world isn't just filled with kindles...nooks are here also.


message 9: by Amber (new)

Amber I'm disappointed to see that there's no option for authors to donate ebooks directly to the cause, and also concur that there's a lot of issues here with electricity and costs eating up donations that could go farther. It's a great idea, but the execution needs to be refined.


message 10: by Izzy (new)

Izzy Lord Nouda wrote: "Personally I'd rather have them receive actual books than ebooks/kindles. That stuff ain't cheap. Amazon sells them at a loss and frankly, for that kind of price we'd be off sending them our second..."

I agree but I think getting e-readers is better than getting nothing at all.


message 11: by Aditi (new)

Aditi Hey, I have a tonne of PDFs and was wondering if you would like to have them? They range from fiction to non fiction.

This is really great!


message 12: by Nia (new)

Nia Smani Dee wrote: "I believe there is a pilot program for providing kindles in africa - I was reading about it recently - but they found that there was a high rate of breakage which was something that they were add new or you losetakin..."


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