The Best American Science Writing 2001
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The Best American Science Writing 2001 (Best American Science Writing)

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3.92 of 5 stars 3.92  ·  rating details  ·  40 ratings  ·  2 reviews
Gathered from the nation's leading publications by award-winning author Timothy Ferris, The Best American Science Writing 2001 is a dynamic, up-to-date collection of essays and articles by America's most prominent thinkers and writers, addressing the most controversial, socially relevant topics that recent developments in science pose.

Among the contributors: Richard Presto...more
Paperback, 352 pages
Published October 16th 2001 by Ecco (first published October 2001)
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Chad Bearden
Like most things Timothy Ferris is involved in, there is a bit more whimsy than I like to see in my science writing, but with the inclusion of some thorough science journalism, the 2001 edition of the Best American Science Writing series is more good than bad.

Surprisingly, the least effective stuff includes most of the articals concerning physics and astronomy. What with this being Ferris's field, one might assume he's have a unique insight into tracking down the most engaging articals from that...more
Richard
(Still reading...)

Quote from page 67, in Richard Preston's bio essay on Craig Venter, "The Genome Warrior" (originally published in The New Yorker):
I placed some of the DNA on the ends of my fingers and rubbed them together. The stuff was sticky. It began to dissolve on my skin. "It's melting -- like cotton candy."
"Sure. That's the sugar in the DNA," Smith said.
"Would it taste sweet?"
"No. DNA is an acid, and it's got salts in it. Actually, I've never tasted it."
Later, I got some dried calf DNA.
...more
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Timothy Ferris is the author of a dozen books (most recently The Science of Liberty), plus 200 articles and essays, and three documentary films—"The Creation of the Universe," “Life Beyond Earth,” and “Seeing in the Dark”—seen by over 20 million viewers.

Ferris produced the Voyager phonograph record, an artifact of human civilization containing music and sounds of Earth launched aboard the twin Voy...more
More about Timothy Ferris...
Coming of Age in the Milky Way The Whole Shebang: A State-of-the-Universe(s) Report The Science of Liberty: Democracy, Reason, and the Laws of Nature Seeing in the Dark: How Amateur Astronomers Are Discovering the Wonders of the Universe The World Treasury of Physics, Astronomy & Mathematics from Albert Einstein to Stephen W. Hawking & from Annie Dillard to John Updike

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“I placed some of the DNA on the ends of my fingers and rubbed them together. The stuff was sticky. It began to dissolve on my skin. 'It's melting -- like cotton candy.'
'Sure. That's the sugar in the DNA,' Smith said.
'Would it taste sweet?'
'No. DNA is an acid, and it's got salts in it. Actually, I've never tasted it.'
Later, I got some dried calf DNA. I placed a bit of the fluff on my tongue. It melted into a gluey ooze that stuck to the roof of my mouth in a blob. The blob felt slippery on my tongue, and the taste of pure DNA appeared. It had a soft taste, unsweet, rather bland, with a touch of acid and a hint of salt. Perhaps like the earth's primordial sea. It faded away.

Page 67, in Richard Preston's biographical essay on Craig Venter, "The Genome Warrior" (originally published in The New Yorker in 2000).
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