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Beyond Barbie and Mortal Kombat: New Perspectives on Gender and Gaming
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Beyond Barbie and Mortal Kombat: New Perspectives on Gender and Gaming

3.80  ·  Rating Details  ·  64 Ratings  ·  8 Reviews
Ten years after the groundbreaking "From Barbie to Mortal Kombat "highlighted the ways gender stereotyping and related social and economic issues permeate digital game play, the number of women and girl gamers has risen considerably. Despite this, gender disparities remain in gaming. Women may be warriors in World of Warcraft, but they are also scantily clad "booth babes" ...more
Paperback, 371 pages
Published February 25th 2011 by MIT Press (MA) (first published September 30th 2008)
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Lani
May 17, 2009 Lani rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
A 10 year update to From Barbie to Mortal Kombat, and basically a "where are we now" assessment of women in gaming. Many of the same contributors have new research, and other contributers frequently cite the previous stuff.

Gaming is certainly very different in 2008 as compared to 1998. Web games, mobile gaming, and even more 'casual friendly' console gaming like the Wii and the DS have broadened the spectrum of gaming and its audience. Reading this immediately after reading the previous book mea
...more
N
Jan 18, 2015 N rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
1) "[...] designers and critics alike have continued to find it difficult to avoid essentializing gender as designers seek to identify what types of games girls want to play and reformers seek to promote the kinds of games they think girls should be playing. Often, both sides have lost track of the fact that gender is a continuum rather than a set of binary oppositions: one is never going to design games that adequately reflect the tastes, interests, and needs of all girls. At the 2006 workshop, ...more
Elevate Difference
As I opened this collection, I had just finished shaking my head at a picture a man I know well posted of himself grinning vividly, arms around a young woman clad in a chain mail bikini top at a gaming conference. This “booth babe” photo rests comfortably within the confines of his MySpace page. I cracked the spine of this volume considering how I felt about the girl, the picture, the medium, and my own experiences as feminist scholar who is also an avid gamer. This book, I realized, is a timely ...more
David Blanar
Likely a good companion to the conference it was associated with, now it stands as a pretty soft contribution to the overall literature on the subject. There are some good nuggets - particularly the quantitative research about gender differences in gaming approaches - but otherwise harmless.
Bex Edmondson
Dec 25, 2015 Bex Edmondson rated it it was ok
Shelves: games
There were one or two interesting chapters, and the interviews at the end were good; aside from that, this book is rather outdated and (bizarrely) sexist.
Shannon
Sep 19, 2012 Shannon rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
I liked this book for the overall history of girl gaming and for its coverage of what makes a successful game for girls. I wasn't entirely interested in the section of women in the game development field, but it was still interesting to skim.
Kurt
Jul 13, 2010 Kurt rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Fascinating book; lots of data, lots of opinions. Worth reading if you enjoy game theory, gender issues, and/or pre-adult social science.
Jocelyn
Apr 01, 2009 Jocelyn rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: non-fiction, games
I found the essays on other cultures such as Japan interesting, but overall it's a very dry read.
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Yasmin B. Kafai, Ph.D., is a Professor of Learning Sciences at the University of Pennsylvania Graduate School of Education, past president of the International Society of the Learning Sciences (ISLS), and an executive editor of the Journal of the Learning Sciences.
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