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Collision Course: Federal Education Policy Meets State and Local Realities

3.21  ·  Rating Details ·  19 Ratings  ·  3 Reviews
What happens when federal officials try to accomplish goals that depend on the resources and efforts of state and local governments? Focusing on the nation's experience with the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB), Manna's engaging case study considers just that question. Beyond the administrative challenges NCLB unleashed, "Collision Course" examines the dynamics at work when ...more
Paperback, 206 pages
Published October 12th 2010 by CQ Press
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Steven Peterson
Dec 14, 2010 Steven Peterson rated it liked it
An interesting policy-oriented volume. The focus? A case study of "No Child Left Behind." The subtitle of the book says much: "Federal Education Policy Meets State and Local Realities." Key question: What should the federal government's role in education be? Traditionallyu, this has been perceived as a local (and state) responsibility. How does "No Child Left Behind" (hereafter, NCLB) fit in?

The book begins with an examination of national government's role in K-12 education. The NCLB logic and l
...more
Mykle Law
Jun 05, 2015 Mykle Law rated it liked it
I would likely have given this 4 stars if it had anything more than the barest hint of a nod to the implications for pedagogy and teaching practice.

A well-crafted analysis of numbers, narratives, and theory, it makes a good case for why the No Child Left Behind Act is basically not one law, but 50, given the individualized manner in which each state implemented it.

See my much longer review here: https://elkym.wordpress.com/2011/11/0...
Kevin Kosar
Jun 03, 2011 Kevin Kosar rated it really liked it
My review of this book is at the: Federal Education Policy History website.
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