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Where Did I Come From?
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Where Did I Come From?

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4.07 of 5 stars 4.07  ·  rating details  ·  515 ratings  ·  110 reviews
Describes the reproductive process from intercourse to birth.
Paperback, 48 pages
Published December 1st 2000 by Lyle Stuart (first published January 1st 1973)
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(showing 1-30 of 954)
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smetchie
I cannot believe this book is written by the same Peter Mayle who wrote A Year in Provence! HAHAHAHAA!

I like that this book exists. It's written for children and explains where babies come from in a very straightforward way. The illustrations are wonderful, cute and really funny. The whole book is hilariously informative, actually. But I think it explains the sex part a bit too well. Of course, that's the parent talking. That's not at all what I thought when I read it as a kid. When I read it a
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Crystal
Mar 26, 2011 Crystal rated it 2 of 5 stars
Shelves: own
I bought this because it was recommended by some neighbors and also by authors Ken and Linda Eyre (whose wisdom and parenting advice I find very helpful) but this book is not for us and our children at this time. There are parts that are probably fine to teach children about how babies grow, etc. but the parts specifically related to sex and what function genitalia plays in that doesn't fit with how I envision teaching my children about sex. Something about the way it's worded just feels weird a ...more
Charlie
This was the book my parents bought me when I was a kid (5ish, maybe younger) . . . it was really good. It's simple enough that a questioning child can understand the mechanics and avoid myths.

I have NO idea what the fuss with the naked people is about. They're drawn completely unsexually, to illustrate the human body.

And yes, it does mention what sex 'feels like', but that is an INEVITABLE question kids will ask. They'll want to know WHY people have sex, and if you don't tell them, they will w
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Katsumi
This book is definitely developed with the child in mind. It is easy to read, it provides humor, and definitely gets the point across on a subject which can often be difficult to approach.
I notice that some reviewers worry that the book provides children with too much information or is too graphic. I find that the book would be incomplete if some of the information or the pictures were omitted.

As a child, I found myself really studying the pictures, cartoon images that are presented very taste
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Miri
This book made me laugh out loud more than once. It's another pretty explicit one, but the more I read them (and find myself cringing) the more I think, you know what? It's not that weird to tell kids about sex. We've made it weird because we're an incredibly repressed society, but good grief, it's a bodily function and it's something everyone does and it's how the human race even exists. It just doesn't need to be that big a deal, and if you talk to kids about it as though it isn't, I bet it wo ...more
Jindejak (elsewhere? how?)
This book was read to me when I was 4, 5 - at some point I became the reader. I loved this book, my sibs, nieces, & nephews are fans too. My son had it read to him. Showing people not model perfect and parts that the children have already seen and are curious about anyway in a simple straight forward manner is a good thing. Curiosity strikes at an early age and the why does her/his pee pee look different question is at least floating around. A great book for all IMO.
Christen
I seriously can't believe this book was on the shelf. It's flat out breath-taking, some of the information and pictures you're going to find in this book. A must read. Seriously. And yes, it IS the african-american edition. BOOYAH!
Heather
I don't know if I'm mature enough to have this conversation. I read this book in preparation for THE TALK.

My first reaction on opening this book was to close it. Holy naked cartoon people. They are chubby and unattractive cartoon people, but they're naked and on every stinking page. And they're anatomically correct. It was a bit much for me.

I finally opened it again and read the text. And closed it. Then opened it again and re-read it. It's good that proper names are used, but I'm not sure I wa
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Jessica
This is a fabulous book to help you with your first talk to teach your kids about sex. I used this along with another great resource at valuesparenting.com. In our family we have the 'big talk' sometime around when our kids turn 8, and then have talks every year after that. (or whenever they need to) I believe that if children trust their parents and feel comfortable talking to them about sexual matters, they will be armed to deal with what they encounter from the rest of the world with confiden ...more
jolszko
I had this book in hardback when my kids were young. My older child had more experience with the whole idea. I was pregnant when he was 3. He carried that book around a lot. It had a plump cartoonish couple throughout the book. There is a picture (not graphic) of them under the covers with hearts floating up. My son used to say "that is my favorite picture, the one with all of the love feelings"

Very non threatening, non graphic for the modest or squeamish of you. An orgasmism is compared to a sn
...more
Lisa E.
This was the book I checked out from my local library when I was 6 years old and trying to figure out what was going on with my mother's belly...where did my LITTLE BROTHER come from? And then I shared it with my own children when they started asking questions too. Amusing and educational, with child friendly drawings, it is a gem.

It explains the biological aspects of how sex works, and how conception occurs. The cellular level details are charming - smiling sperm, anyone? And I like that it us
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Laura
My boys are ages 4 and 6 and we've been having a lot of discussions about sex lately, especially since I'm expecting another baby. I didn't really think I needed a book but thought that pictures might be helpful, so I decided to check out a few books that have high recommendations. I'm really not a fan.

Page after page show fully nude men and women, usually just standing but also in a bathtub and in bed. I don't think picturing other people in the act is appropriate for kids or adults, even if th
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Alisa
We have "the talk" with our kids when they turn eight. Since that momentous birthday just came for our twins we got to rediscover this little treasure :) This has great illustrations that really get down to the details in a very appropriate way. I recommend you read "How to Talk to Children About Sex" by Linda and Richard Eyer first and then use this book to help you with "the talk." (thank you Sarah for that recommendation years ago!) Three very successful discussions down, two to go!
Jenalyn
Good book to explain things in a nonsensical way. I paper-clipped some of the middle pages together and we skipped over those. The cartoon pictures are funny, but respectful. I'll probably use it for my other children as well.
Rm
Aug 05, 2011 Rm added it
How I learned about sex. =) My mom showed me the video when I was 4 or 5. I love the sperm in the top hat!
Thoraiya
Really,a book published in 1973 is still the best book out there for explaining this to little kids?

Yep.
Kim Hufford
I'm honestly not sure how to rate this. I'm not the least bit surprised this was banned. Wow.
Sally
This is where I learned about sex and was my only source of info until Haley's family got HBO.
Jessica
If you need a great simple book about sex/where babies come from, this is a great book! It explains it all in simple but correct language, is respectful about the process. Read it first, to gage what age level you want to read it to. It goes into the WHOLE process, so if you have a young child who just has basic questions, this will be too much. I even let my older boys read it (who we have already talked to about sex) and I think it cleared up some of the questions they were afraid to ask. It o ...more
Janene
Heard about this as a recommendation from the Eyres on a good jumping off place for the TALK with your kids. I've loved lots of their parenting advice and books, so I was expecting just the book I would want. Ummmmm. Not even close. I returned it to the library the very next day. There must be a better way to talk to my children about sex without a picture book with alarming naked cartoon parents. And not just on one page. I am hoping for open conversations and want to be ready when my child has ...more
Ellen Allerton
Excellent book to help you explain the "facts of life" to your children. You will need to read this book before you read it with your child. It does explain everything, and answers almost every question you could get in an honest factual and kid friendly way. Lots of humor and honesty. Very well done.
Liane
Genre: Factual non-fiction picture book

Reading Level: Transitional

Topics & Themes: Gives a very straightforward description of sex and pregnancy.

Curricular Use: Not recommended for classroom use. Suggest for parents to confront the topic

Social: How sex happens and who between: mom and dad.

Text & Pictures: Interaction of text and pictures. Pictures are graphic and extremely detailed. If give this book to a child be prepared to face questions and embarrassment.

Additional Notes: I am on the
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Alicia Thomas-Woolf
Speaking of children's books, my parents did me the very great favour of ensuring that I knew the facts of life at an early age. This book is a superb introduction, and the knowledge contained therein saved me from great misery later in life.
Kristen
Hmm ... I am just not sure what to think of this book. It is the book that the "How to talk to your kids about sex" book recommends reading with your kids (at age 8) for the actual details of the "big talk." The information is straight forward and completely factual, of course, but the illustrations are a little too much, and cartoonish, which makes everything seem a little ridiculous (like the sperm with top hats - do we need to confuse kids even more?)
I can't decide if I'll actually read this
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Shauna
I went to the library today to look through all the "how to talk to your kids about sex" books so I could decide which one I like and want to buy. I chose this one. It is very simple and doesn't go into puberty or types of families, which we'll save for another conversation. There were several other books I looked at that were good, but way too much information to jump into all at once, and certainly not anything I would just hand to my kid and say, "Here, read this and let me know if you have a ...more
Joyce Santiago
My daughter has been very curious about body parts lately and I thought it would be a good idea to check out a few books from the library to help her figure things out. I think I may have jumped the gun with this one. Growing up in a house that was EXTREMELY hush hush about sex and our bodies, I've been eager to accommodate my kids the best I could using age appropriate materials.

Unfortunately, I think this was the wrong book to start my 3-year-old off with. I'm glad I took the time to read it
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Christine
I would highly recommend this book for when you are ready to talk about the birds and the bees with your youngster. We just had the talk with my 8 year old and it went very well because of this awesome book!
Cherina
Summary: This book describes (in detail) the process of conceiving a child. The author names of the part of the human reproductive system. He also explains what happens during sex and what results from the action. Towards the end, the book gives a detailed account of the growth of a child within its mother's womb.

Uses: only recommend to parents of a child who is asking question about the topic or who would clearly benefit from the text

Social issues: sex (when to have it, how it is accomplished,
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Angie
Hahahaha books from the 70's are great! I don't think I'll be using this book to teach any kids about reproduction, but it was a great laugh. :)
Jessica
Very of its time with cishet pushed in your face, but still honest and could be helpful in the right circumstances.
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Peter Mayle (born June 14, 1939 in Brighton) is a British author famous for his series of books detailing life in Provence, France. He spent fifteen years in advertising before leaving the business in 1975 to write educational books, including a series on sex education for children and young people. In 1989, A Year in Provence was published and became an international bestseller. His books have be ...more
More about Peter Mayle...
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