Bird Cloud: A Memoir of Place
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Bird Cloud: A Memoir of Place

2.99 of 5 stars 2.99  ·  rating details  ·  831 ratings  ·  234 reviews
“Bird Cloud” is the name Annie Proulx gave to 640 acres of Wyoming wetlands and prairie and four-hundred-foot cliffs plunging down to the North Platte River. On the day she first visited, a cloud in the shape of a bird hung in the evening sky. Proulx also saw pelicans, bald eagles, golden eagles, great blue herons, ravens, scores of bluebirds, harriers,...more
ebook, 256 pages
Published January 4th 2011 by Scribner
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Ms Bubbles SockieP
"Well do I know my own character negatives," she writes, "bossy, impatient, reclusively shy, short-tempered, single-minded." Says Annie Proulx. What she didn't add was that she was downright stupid when it came to checking important details.

The book is about Annie looking for the perfect place to build the home of her dreams, the one she looks forward to living in for the rest of her life. She finds the site in a wild place in Wyoming, far from any town or neighbours with only the cries of eagle...more
Snotchocheez
There are some professional actors whose work I totally admire, yet I'd care not a whit to spend two minutes together with them in "the real world" to get to know them. Their art and talent can stay ensconced on the big screen, their real life personae can stay forever cloaked behind their Beverly Hills mansions or Aspen megalithic chalets. After reading "Bird Cloud", Proulx' "memoir" revolving around her acquisition of 640 acres of land in Wyoming and her experiences in building a house on that...more
Carol
I love Annie Proulx's writing and I also love books about the West and meditative works on the natural world. Add these likes with my passion for HGTV and this book seemed like a natural fit for me. Ms Proulx is a wonderful writer but I was not as enthralled with this book as I had expected. I would have liked more information on the process and decisions that led to the design of this massive house. I felt that much of the design for the house was based on snap decisions and not environmentally...more
Diane
Proulx may be a Pulitzer-prize winning fiction writer, but this autobiographical work won't win any prizes from me. First of all, it is boring. Deathly boring. Autobiographies, of course, use the first person a lot, but Proulx writes as if every detail is precious. Every floor tile as she builds her house. Every mistake she made in choosing other houses. Then she launches into the natural settings of her swamp area home with a textbook-like analysis of the lodgepole pines. Proulx is not a nature...more
Glenn
Mixed feelings about this book, which is NOT a memoir, but a chronicle of Proulx's quest for what she hoped would be her dream home in the Wyoming backcountry, named Bird Cloud. Proulx is a master of prose, and her descriptions of Wyoming nature are lyrical. No argument there. But as noted by other readers, Proulx fails to flesh out the people in her story, especially the brothers who built the home and allowed her survive in a land that would otherwise have overwhelmed her limited practical ski...more
Abby Powell
Don't bother reading this book!

I love Annie Proulx's other books and have always enjoyed her writing. When I saw this memoir and it's subject, I thought I might be in for a treat. However, I was met by a long ramble about building a very expensive and particular house in a beautiful area surrounded by nature.

Much of the tone of the book is whining about contractors, architects, etc. all the while going into excruciating detail that quit frankly most people wouldn't care about unless it was thei...more
TheGirlBytheSeaofCortez
American author Annie Proulx is best known for her 1993 novel, The Shipping News, which won both the Pulitzer Prize and a National Book Award, and her 1997 short story, “Brokeback Mountain,” about forbidden cowboy love, which was made into a critically acclaimed movie. Her latest book, a work of non-fiction titled Bird Cloud is subtitled A Memoir, though once the reader really gets into it, he or she wonders if “memoir” is the right word to use.

Most readers associate a memoir with deep personal...more
Judith Hannan
The second star in this rating is out of respect for Proulx. This book is such a disappointment from a wonderful author. Using the experience of building a house in Wyoming, Bird Cloud reads not much differently than a high school textbook--part family lineage, part geological survey, part Native American history, and part a dissertation on the characters that hunted, farmed, and stripped Wyoming of its natural attributes. The greatest problem is that Bird Cloud tells no story, or it starts a s...more
Bookmarks Magazine
Part memoir, part nature journal, part history, and part construction journal, Bird Cloud is, as the Boston Globe sums up, "a strange, disjointed, often beautiful book." The first point many critics commented on was its curious timing given the foreclosure crisis. "There is a whiff of unexamined privilege" throughout, notes the Minneapolis Star Tribune, and most did not disagree. Yet whether in good taste or bad, that wasn't the main point of contention. Reviewers generally agreed that Proulx is...more
Jenny Shank
http://www.star-telegram.com/2011/01/...

Annie Proulx tells of her vivid life on a 'Cloud'
Posted Thursday, Jan. 27, 2011 0 Comments Print Share Share Reprints

By Jenny Shank

Special to the Star-Telegram

If there's any writer with a life and mind intriguing enough to merit a memoir, it's Annie Proulx, who didn't publish her first book of fiction until she was in her 50s, then quickly won just about every award available to an American writer. Proulx's geographical-chameleon nature is unusual for a wr...more
Asma Fedosia
Recommended for readers of the past and present American western states, this memoir is more freewheeling than conventional biography, lengthily covering subjects she had studied and experienced during the first decade of the twenty-first century, quickly covering her ancestors, and entirely missing her fabulous literary career, though she mentions cataloguing her vast library, storing her heaps of manuscripts, and still writing (truly having the scenic solitude to do so once the worrisome atten...more
Pam Lindholm-levy
I read a couple of reviews of this book criticizing Proulx for not fleshing out some of the people we meet, especially the brothers who built her Wyoming home, Bird Cloud. Yes, much of this book is a chronology of finding and buying the land, then planning and building the house. She writes lyrically about the birds, the animals, the sky, the snow, but not about personalities. I guess that's just her.
As a sometime visitor to Wyoming, I could feel the wind, see the snow coming in sideways, know w...more
Renee Thompson
In reviewing Annie Proulx’s BIRD CLOUD, I couldn’t decide whether to give it three stars, or four; it wasn’t a five-star read – that, I’ve reserved for BAD DIRT, her collection of fine short stories – but three stars seemed stingy and rude. Besides, I enjoyed it more than that. But to be honest, I was bored on occasion with the discussion of history and archaeology of the region, preferring Proulx’s description of landscape and antics of the birds (she’s an amateur naturalist and an avid and kno...more
Sheila
Cross Bill Bryson’s At Home with Jane Kirkpatrick’s Homestead and you’ll have something like Annie Proulx’s memoir, Bird Cloud. The Bird Cloud of the title is a beautiful home in a beautiful location, but the book investigates the whole concept of home and home-building, starting with the many places the author has lived and ending, nicely, with the many migratory homes of birds.

A similar parallelism continues throughout the book. The author’s quest for her family’s roots, searching through fami...more
Brandi
I wanted to read this book because I thought it might give me a sense of the land in that part of the country. With a visit to Yellowstone soon, I was expecting more about the land and wildlife and interactions. The best part of the book is near the end when she describes the birds and wildlife, their comings and goings. However, I couldn't help but think that it was just about someone building an extravagant house in an area where nature should be left to itself. There were parts that bored the...more
Jannekb
I have loved Proulx's writing, cherished it in fact, for many years. "Bird Cloud" is far and away my least favorite book of hers, and it was such an unpleasant read it has tarnished my fine memories of her other excellent works of fiction. To discover what an arrogant know-it-all she is, and to try to sympathize with her struggles in building a lavish dream home, is horribly difficult. She seems to be aware that she is not a completely likable person, but the person I barely met in this non-memo...more
Tuck
a fast read, autobiographical in essence of some author Proulx's more than 20 residences growing up in New England joined with her living in Wyoming and deciding to buy a section of land (from the Nature Conservancy on the north Platte river) and building her own home. So readers are regaled with a house building, way out in the wilds of Wyoming, complete with architect, master builders, incompetent sub-contractors, aides helping her unpack LOTS of books, her taking walks and bird watching. Some...more
Kim G
Annie Proulx is a great writer, but I would not want to have her over for a dinner party.

I'm not allergic to the memoirs of the privileged and entitled, necessarily, and I made it through Proulx's fits over speckles on the floor and disappointing light fixtures with only mild discomfort, but by the time I made it to her snippy take on her superior methods of birdwatching I wanted to launch this book out a window.

It's a bummer, because there are a lot of promising threads in the book, but they'...more
Marianna
I was so disappointed in this book. After reading a number of glowing reviews I was so excited to start it. I finally just skipped the second chapter and the detailed outline of Proulx's family tree. Suffice it to say that family trees are only interesting to the family in question. Chapter three seemed promising, but then got bogged down by what I felt was whininess. I sort of skipped ahead to learn why Proulx found the house less than satisfactory--inaccessability at the height of winter. Well...more
Jay
Hmm... Near the middle of this book, while moving to her new home in Wyoming she calls Bird Cloud, Proulx says that the people moving her boxes of manuscripts re-ordered the papers to pack them more efficiently, and she says she'd kill the movers if she could find them. This memoir, "Bird Cloud", feels like the results of that jumbling of manuscripts. It really consists of four parts that could easily have been stand-alone articles. The parts are genealogy stories, history of the land she purcha...more
Men D.
Oh my God she is so tiresome and unlikeable. I have loved Annie Proulx's work. Close Range. Heart Songs. But WTF is this? An old lady complaining that she blew too much money on a ridiculously sited mansion on a remote Wyoming cliff. OF COURSE your stupid expensive Brazilian tile isn't going to be the reddish earth-tone that you want! Call your architect in the middle of the night and complain! Cry me a fucking river!
Julie
Loved "The Shipping News" by the same author. She's wonderful with descriptions. However, this book had too much global warming bullcrap for my taste. Loved the last chapter about the eagles but it wasn't enough to save the entire experience. A quick read of a day for me.
Donna
Interesting natural history and nature information, but the struggle to have her dream house built felt like she was complaining throughout. Even the narrator's voice sounded whining.
Carey Combe
Oh dear, had she run out of ideas about what to write? Pure sentimental, boring claptrap.
Maggi
Kind of a snoozer. I think she wanted to pay for her expensive house.
Kenny Taylor
I may have had too high expectations of Bird Cloud. For a writer of her undoubted skill - which is still evident throughout - I was still left feeling it was just lacking that final spark. The book is roughly three parts - a history of the area in Wyoming and her family history, the second is building the house and the (shorter) third is some thoughts of living in it. Her prose and descriptions are as ever, the highlight - unfussy, robust and concise. However, and while it will be of interest to...more
Spider
I quit this audio experience on the 7th & final CD, about 4 tracks in. Ugh- I just couldn't take any more. It was an interesting idea about experiences & a place I wanted to know more about made uninteresting by the telling. It was disappointing. It was dull. There was much we might have learned about about injustice to Indians, about the deaths of birds & animals, & environmental degradation, but the information was presented in a jaded & judgmental way- it left me dispirit...more
Sherry (sethurner)
I like Annie Proulx, but I have to say this is my least favorite so far. Bird Cloud is the name of the Wyoming property she bought a few years ago. She had a place in Colorado, but sold it and fell in love with the landscape by a cliff. Most of the book is about buying the land, hiring an architect and builders and then the endless details of getting the place built. But scattered through the book are chapters that seem only tangentially related. There's one on do some family history research. T...more
Jennifer D
Jul 17, 2013 Jennifer D rated it 4 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition Recommends it for: those interested in Wyoming history and big fans of Annie Proulx
my review, as it appeared in book browse, february, 2011:


Bird Cloud, Annie Proulx's first work of nonfiction in twenty years, is subtitled "A Memoir." To many readers who might be hoping for a full-blown, linear account of Proulx's life, this subtitle will be somewhat misleading and possibly disappointing. For careful readers and those with strong, natural curiosity, however, Bird Cloud will be a treasure in which Proulx reveals herself – sometimes directly and other times in more subtle ways. P...more
Bonnie

This is a long rambling book about the creation of the author's home in Wyoming. The story of the home's construction would have been a good book by itself, but Annie Proulx embellishes it with many meandering detours along the way. One side trip is to Annie's earliest memories and her many homes as she grew up. And, along the way, the family genealogy. The reader learns the lore of the area surrounding Bird Cloud, as she named the site of the nascent house. The history includes neighboring ranc...more
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Also published as E. Annie Proulx
Edna Annie Proulx is an American journalist and author. Her second novel, The Shipping News (1993), won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction and the National Book Award for fiction in 1994. Her short story "Brokeback Mountain" was adapted as an Academy Award, BAFTA and Golden Globe Award-winning major motion picture released in 2005. Brokeback Mountain received massive c...more
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The Shipping News Brokeback Mountain Close Range Accordion Crimes Postcards

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“Walking on the land or digging in the fine soil I am intensely aware that time quivers slightly, changes occurring in imperceptible and minute ways, accumulating so subtly that they seem not to exist. Yet the tiny shifts in everything--cell replication, the rain of dust motes, lengthening hair, wind-pushed rocks--press inexorably on and on.” 3 likes
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