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Jubal Sackett (The Sacketts #4)

4.14  ·  Rating Details ·  4,758 Ratings  ·  180 Reviews

In Jubal Sackett, the second generation of Louis L’Amour’s great American family pursues a destiny in the wilderness of a sprawling new land.

Jubal Sackett’s urge to explore drove him westward, and when a Natchez priest asks him to undertake a nearly impossible quest, Sackett ventures into the endless grassy plains the Indians call the Far Seeing Lands. He seeks a Natchez
...more
Audio, 0 pages
Published July 26th 2005 by Random House Audio (first published May 1985)
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Community Reviews

(showing 1-30 of 3,000)
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Mr. Matt
Feb 06, 2015 Mr. Matt rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: 2015
This book definitely started off slower than the other Sackett books, but my goodness, what a great book. Jubal Sackett, the quiet son of Barnabas, is a loner, a dreamer, an explorer. Like his father, he has a love for the land. He is not content to stay in the wild frontier of the Carolinas or even the rugged Tennessee valley. Jubal, virtually half native by upbringing and inclination, wants to see the great mountains that divide this new continent. The tug of the distant frontier, the lure of ...more
Kate Roman
Jul 31, 2009 Kate Roman rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition

So it was that in the last hour of darkness I went down the mountain through the laurel sticks, crossed a small stream, and skirted a meadow to come to the trace I sought.

Nearly one hundred years before De Soto had come this way, his marchings and his cruelties leaving no more mark than the stirring of leaves as he passed. A few old Indians had vague recollections of De Soto, but they merely shrugged at our questions. We who wandered this land knew this was no "new world". The term was merely a
...more
Mike (the Paladin)
I got this audio version of the book from the library recently to listen to when I was busy with mindless tasks...or just wanted something on when I was "relaxing". I read it many years ago and recalled it as I listened. On the whole I like Louis L'Amour and this is an early title(in the story's time line) of his most "iconic" fictional family the Sacketts.

I've read several reviews of the L'Amour books here and one thing I've seen criticized in them (though not "real" often) is his treatment of
...more
Jacob Proffitt
Feb 03, 2015 Jacob Proffitt rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: western
I enjoyed this one, too, though not quite as much as the last. Which is odd, now I think on it. I liked Jubal much more than Kin, and his story is nearly as strong. I think I didn't connect very well with Jubal's goals, though, and his "dream" of going ever further west and seeing things no other white man had seen didn't really thrill me much. Which is a shame, because Itchakomi is by far my favorite heroine so far, too (though I found the chapter from her perspective a bit jarring).

Again, we s
...more
JBradford
Nov 25, 2012 JBradford rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
I stopped in at the VA Medical Center a couple days ago to update my prescriptions and looked over the collection of pocketbooks on the swap table in the waiting room while waiting to be processed, and I found a bunch of paperback books by Louis L’Amour. They were old pocketbooks, which is only natural, because I have been reading Louis L’Amour’s novels since I was a teenager. I grabbed one that I did not recognize as having read before, with a reason for taking it mostly being because of the pi ...more
Stan Crowe
Jul 15, 2012 Stan Crowe rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
I have to say that this one really surprised me. I've never been a L'Amour fan, to be honest (though my mom's dad had read, I think, every last one of his novels), but I think I could get into L'Amour easily if I tried.

Normally, I wouldn't have enjoyed a book written like this: there was a high level of repetition, some plot resolutions that seemed just a bit too easy (and that were, by and large, foregone conclusions), and some bald foreshadowing that could easily have killed off any suspense b
...more
John
Since the L'Amour books featuring Barnabas Sackett (the original patriarch of the Sackett clan) are so incredibly lame, I'm surprised how much better he did at writing about Barnabas' sons. It probably has something to do with the Barnabas books being largely set in England--a country L'Amour wasn't nearly so good at portraying.
There isn't much plot in JUBAL SACKETT. Mostly, it's about the titular character exploring the wilderness and trying not to die. Indians try to kill him, Spanish soldiers
...more
Victoria
As a wee little lass I remember my dad and big brother constantly reading Louis L'Amour. In a flurry of nostalgia I decided to read Mr. L'Amour primarily as a "reading bond" with them. My dad now reads Lee Child, John Grisham, or the local paper. My brother, well, he is the intellect in the family so he now prefers lofty literary tomes.

But when I told them I was reading Jubal Sackett, they both gave a sweet sigh of approval. Despite the fact that they haven't read these books in decades, Louis
...more
Kayla
May 23, 2015 Kayla rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
It may have taken me two months to read this book (I've been busy with school), but I finally finished it!I started it during spring break and finished it during the two weeks of my summer break.

Overall this was a good book. It is the longest book in the Sackett series and I felt like L'Amour could have edited it down a bit. He also wrapped the book up in his typical rushed ending fashion by throwing in a mammoth (that's right-mammoth mastodon!) fight/attack seen in the last few pages.

I did lik
...more
Laudys
Dec 17, 2012 Laudys rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: favorites
My aunt found this book at an airport and gave it to me. I put off reading it for so long, 'cause I don't really read western. I just don't find the genre that appealing... but this book. This book.

I've read it more times that should be allowed to. It's one of my default fall-to book. I just grab it if there's a prospect of me getting stuck in a waiting room and I proceed to devour it every time (and yes, I may have developed a crush on Jubal Sackett along the way).

The plot is just stuff happeni
...more
Sherrie
*spoilers*
this was my first louis l'amour book. i thought it was good and interesting to read about this time period of american history. my only complaint is that most of the book was jubal watching for enemies, "there was movement! it's an indian!" etc. that got kind of boring. also i was really intrigued by the mummies he found in the cave and the "find them" plot. then at the end, he totally leaves that plot hanging. that was a huge bummer. oh well. but i enjoyed reading it. not sure if i'll
...more
Raul Barajas
Jan 15, 2016 Raul Barajas rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
The book, Jubal Sackett, was a well structured and written book which introduced Jubal in a manner that allowed me to follow the events more closely with suspense. Started off slow, but allows me to get to know Jubal’s background, which characterizes him as a person in the Sackett family. Through Jubal’s exploration for a home in the Western Frontier and a bond with an experienced Kickapoo warrior named Keokatah he finds friendships, enemies, interests, and adventure which had me waiting for eve ...more
Ed
Jul 31, 2015 Ed rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
#4 chronologically in the Sackett series (#17 in publication order). Author L'Amour died 3 years after this series entry was published. He had planned on writing over 20 more series entries to fill the gaps in the Sackett saga; as it turned out their is a gap of over 200 years between this entry about the dawn of the American westward exploration in the 1620s and the next entry #5 Ride the River (1983) which takes place in the pre-Civil War period of the 1840s-1850s. As opposed to the taut weste ...more
High Plains Library District
As a wee little lass I remember my dad and big brother constantly reading Louis L'Amour. In a flurry of nostalgia I decided to read Mr. L'Amour primarily as a "reading bond" with them. My dad now reads Lee Child, John Grisham, or the local paper. My brother, well, he is the intellect in the family so he now prefers lofty literary tomes.

But when I told them I was reading Jubal Sackett, they both gave a sweet sigh of approval. Despite the fact that they haven't read these books in decades, Louis
...more
Angie Lisle
Oct 01, 2015 Angie Lisle rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
This has been my favorite book in the series so far - would've been five-star if L'Amour had just left out the animals, the first being Jubal's pet buffalo and the second being the Mammoth/Mastodon. Pure fantasy on L'Amour's part and I had problems buying it. Through his entire body of work, L'Amour repeatedly mentions that Columbus wasn't the first to discover America - the Mammoth scene in this book made me think that maybe L'Amour should've stepped out of this series to do another stand-alone ...more
Dyana
May 22, 2015 Dyana rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
I am retired with a lot of time to read and ponder why I have never read any Louis L'Amour books before. I guess I always thought they were just "westerns". How wrong I was. In the back of this book the author writes: "I think of myself in the oral tradition - of a troubadour, a village taleteller, the man in the shadows of the campfire. That's the way I'd like to be remembered - as a storyteller. A good storyteller." Louis L'Amour is definitely a fantastic storyteller. This book was engrossing ...more
Aaron Toponce
Hey! This book wasn't about gold! I'll be dipped!

This book felt to me like an honest attempt at writing a fully featured story that was complex, full of plot and conflicts, romance, action, and adventure. Yet, it really fell flat. 338 pages of ... boredom. This was a hard read. It's a very, very, very, very slow burn. Really, it's a journal of Jubal Sackett and his trek across North America from the east coast to the Rockies.

As typical with all Louis L'Amour, the story is highly predictable, exc
...more
Cade
Aug 28, 2009 Cade rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
S
So I didn't have to actually read the end of some sentences as I could predict what they were going to say. When it comes down to it, you just have to pick up a Louis L'Amour every now and then. The best part of this book - the inscription - it was a Father's Day gift to my Dad in '84 or '86 (hardback even) from my sister when she only had two kids.
Lorraine
Nov 30, 2011 Lorraine rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: adventure
I have read many Louis L'Amour books, but this is the one I remember the most. This was an exciting story that I read many years ago and enjoyed very much. Jubal Sackett left his family home to explore America. I can't remember exactly where he went, but he saw buffalo in great herds and saw Niagara Falls and (I think) the Grand Canyon.
JD
Apr 03, 2016 JD rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
I really enjoy the history that is woven into the story. I think the best novels are always historical novels that weave their story around actual events and places. In some of the pages, the reader can actually picture the scenes, and almost feel the atmosphere, the tension and the nerves on edge during the more exciting episodes. I really love this book, and I enjoy the Sackett series because each story weaves with another and I feel that even though each book ends before I want the story to e ...more
Caleb Hettinga
Jan 29, 2014 Caleb Hettinga rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Caleb Hettinga
11/29/13
Mrs. Johnson-Per.1
Book Review #2

1.) Introduction: This novel is titled Jubal Sackett, and was written by Louis L’amour. Bantam Books, Inc published this book in 1985. This book is an adventurous survival story that involves Indians, fighting, survival, and love.

2.) Brief Summary: The story starts out with Jubal Sackett, an English-blooded, American-born late teen alone in the woods of the Appalates Mountains. He is exploring the east coast out of curiosity, surviving off th
...more
Scott Lyson
Apr 09, 2016 Scott Lyson rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: favorites
"A cold wind blew off Hanging Dog Mountain and I held no fire, nor dared I strike so much as a spark that might betray my hiding place. Somewhere near, an enemy lurked, waiting."
Bonnie
This was Louis L'Amour's fourth book telling about the Sackett's first and second generations in America. I'm again impressed with his description of the hardships these early settlers withstood, and the type of people they had to be to do it. I see it at the earliest formation of a national character, which is still in evident in our stubborn clinging to sometimes outmoded values. Unfortunately, we're left at this point in the tale, as the author wasn't able to fill in all the generations from ...more
Shawn
Feb 21, 2016 Shawn rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: history, westerns
A beautiful continuation of the Sackett family. This one focuses on Jubal, one of Barnabas' sons. Jubal has gone west, eventually crossing the Mississippi and the Great Plains into the Rockies. There is a lot of wandering and pondering by Jubal punctuated by different battles with enemies he has picked up along the way. Much of the focus is on his relationship with the Native Americans. He respects them, but foresees the troubles that will be coming their way. L'Amour, though, recognizes the com ...more
Jean
Jun 04, 2016 Jean rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
This falls in the category of "historical fiction," but in all honesty, I did have trouble suspending disbelief in some parts. I wanted to believe, I tried to believe, and yet ...

Still for the most part it is romping good fun. The fun far outweighed the "nooooo" moments.

If you are a true fan of the Sacketts, this is a must read. People who like Westerns or historical fiction might like it. It is a strong 3.5 star book, but I will round up because the Sacketts are so remarkable that maybe, just
...more
Dawn
I purchased the start of this series about a decade a ago. It is unknown why I have not picked up the books until this year. Unfortunately I started with the third book in the series. The fortunate part was it made no difference as I was able to read the book and enjoy it.

Jubal Sackett is the third son to Barnabas Sackett, who left to go west and explore the new territories. His mother took his younger brother and sister back to England to continue their education and raise them in society. Jub
...more
Kate Sherrod
May 13, 2013 Kate Sherrod rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Each of Louis L'Amour's Sackett novels becomes my new favorite as I read along, but I'm starting to see a bit of a pattern forming of which I might tire. That pattern being that each novel is, in no small part, about its chosen Sackett's quest for a wife with whom to make more Sacketts to be waiting there to greet the rest of the white folks when they finally get around to settling the interior of the North American continent.

So far, though, there is plenty of variety within that narrative, and
...more
Stan
Feb 24, 2010 Stan rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
I have to say that this one really surprised me. I've never been a L'Amour fan, to be honest (though my mom's dad had read, I think, every last one of his novels), but I think I could get into L'Amour easily if I tried.

Normally, I wouldn't have enjoyed a book written like this: there was a high level of repetition, some plot resolutions that seemed just a bit too easy (and that were, by and large, foregone conclusions), and some bald foreshadowing that could easily have killed off any suspense b
...more
Mary
Oct 07, 2012 Mary rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
The exposition of “Jubal Sackett” by Louis L’amour starts you on the journey with Jubal Sackett, a yeoman, who is heading westward. You learn he is being followed by someone or something which you later you find out the identity of. In this first chapter or so you get to know who Jubal Sackett really is, and some of his family back ground. He talks about his father, his mother and brothers and sister, how they are in England and how his father is here in the Americas but he has left him behind. ...more
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Louis L'Amour was an American author. L'Amour's books, primarily Western fiction, remain enormously popular, and most have gone through multiple printings. At the time of his death all 101 of his works were in print (86 novels, 14 short-story collections and one full-length work of nonfiction) and he was considered "one of the world's most popular writers".
-Wikipedia
More about Louis L'Amour...

Other Books in the Series

The Sacketts (1 - 10 of 18 books)
  • Sackett's Land
  • To the Far Blue Mountains
  • The Warrior's Path
  • Ride the River
  • The Daybreakers
  • Lando
  • Sackett
  • Mojave Crossing
  • The Sackett Brand
  • The Sky-Liners

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“It is not enough to do, one must also become. I wish to be wiser, stronger, better. This--" I held out my hands "--this thing that is me is incomplete. It is only the raw material with which I have to work. I want to make it better than I received it.” 10 likes
“She did not believe me. "You do not worship the Sun."

"The sun gives life to all things. Without the sun this would be a dark, dead world. Perhaps," I added, "the spirit we worship is the same, and only the names are different. The message from He who rules over us all may come to each people in a different way.”
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