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The Green Mile, Part 1: The Two Dead Girls
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The Green Mile, Part 1: The Two Dead Girls (The Green Mile Part 1)

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4.42 of 5 stars 4.42  ·  rating details  ·  11,908 ratings  ·  174 reviews
The first part of Stephen King's multi-part serial novel that begins on Death Row and goes on to realms of revelation that make death seem sweet.

They were sisters, and the picture perfect image of innocence. No one understood their brutal deaths, not even the man who killed them. But John Coffey is about to gain a new insight, about his life in prison, and about the one ma
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96 pages
Published March 28th 1996 by Penguin UK (first published January 1st 1996)
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Arah-Lynda
It was 1996 when I came across this, a happy accident, at my local 7-11, near the bat tree.

It is 1932 when we first meet Paul Edgecombe, head screw, and our narrator and walk The Green Mile at Cold Mountain, where men are sent to pay their final due to Old Sparky, the electric chair.

It is the year that John Coffey came to Cold Mountain, convicted of brutally raping and killing two, near nine year old twin girls, an enormous man, a mountain in his own right, with wet, dark eyes and a humble, g
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Philip
Man, I wish I was in to Stephen King when this came out in serialized fashion. I watched the movie back then, but hadn't read the book.

In the past 5 to 10 years, I've started reading King.

He's good. He's so good.

I guess the good part is, you know how people binge watch TV shows now? I can binge-read these. Yeah. I'll be doing that.

One thing to add: in book one, there is a great introduction about books and reading in general.
Jamie
I love this story, but I have never sat down to actually read it through before now. I am actually pretty surprised at how faithful the movie adaptation is to the story so far. I recall quite a bit of narration in the movie, but I know they do not go to the depths the books do. There is a bit more nebulous an idea of a solid timeline in the books than in the movie, which I think is probably more true to the idea of the story, since Paul is telling us the story from the standpoint of an older man ...more
♥ Marlene♥
Oh good memories. Back in the days my dad gave me such a great gift. He gave me this book, part 1 and told me that from now on, I could go to the bookstore in town each month, to get the next part of the series.


So every month I ran to the bookstore and immediately delved in. Never thinking it might be better to wait till I had all of them, before reading. couldn't, even if I wanted to.



So unlike most people, I did not read the whole book in one, but i read it in 6 sessions.
I am sure I re-read the
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BoekenTrol
Just a random thought: I bought and read this first book in the feuilleton (according to the note in the front cover) before the English edition was published.

First time I read a book in feuilleton form. I liked it, although stop reading in the middle of a story is very unpleasant... I wanted to know how things would go on, with Coffey, but also with the guards.

There's not much happening here in this first book, just a lot of explaining, getting to know the characters. What struck me was, that
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Kinksrock
Stephen King is one of those authors who can keep a reader's interest despite the length of some of his books, so it makes sense that he can keep your interest in installments of a book of 100 pages each.
Lincoln
I read the "Two Dead Girls" by Stephen King. Tis book is the first out of eight in the green mile series. This book was about the life of an execution prison worker. Throughout the story, the main character, Paul talks about his experiences and leads up to his final execution of Coffey (a 6'10'' African American). Overall I thought this book was fun and interesting to read, because it had many different types of humor, and had life in prison from the prisoners and the workers view. I would recom ...more
Teresa Himes
This will be my third time around with The Green Mile. Both of my previous reads were done as one complete book, this time I plan to read and review it the way it was published.

So, in the first installment of the story, we are mainly getting to know some of the characters. We have of course met Paul, who is the narrator in this book. We have also been introduced to most of his crew. I hate Percy right from the beginning. This may be such a sore spot for me because I know how the story goes from
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Ryan
This series of books was the first Stephen King books i started to read and it certainly did not disappoint me with it's title and storyline that kept me reading until the end.
It is written in a first-person narrative told by Paul Edgecombe, the novel switches between Paul as an old man in the Georgia Pines nursing home sharing his story with fellow resident Elaine Connelly in 1996, and his time in 1932 as the block supervisor of the Cold Mountain Penitentiary death row, nicknamed "The Green M
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Rachel
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Zach Volz
I thought that this book was an okay book. I liked it but I found it hard to follow. It told about how this larger black man went to jail for killing these two girls but in the end he is a really humble guy. He was later killed in jail by the electric chair known as "sparky". I would recommend this book to high school students because there were often parts I didn't understand and found confusing.
Charis Murray
Excellent book excellent movie. BUT that being said when this book came out a couple chapters at a time is when I stopped reading Stephen King. Well almost anyway. If you want to sell me a $30. book then sell me a $30. book. do not give me a couple chapters. This book came out in the early nineties I believe. Books back then were still $6-$7 You did not get to see reviews there were no e-books and if you waited your turn at the library it could take months to get a book. That being said this boo ...more
Bradley
Eerie and fascinating. King is a damned good writer. Too bad I have seen the movie, but the book carries the story well on its own. Definitely looking forward to the next part of the series.
Panu Mäkinen
Stephen King kokeilee romaanin julkaisua pienten pokkareiden sarjana 1800-luvun jatkokertomusten tyyliin. Koko sarja on nähnyt päivän valon jo viime vuosituhannen puolella, joten kertomuksesta voi nautiskella omaan tahtiin tarvitsematta odottaa aina kuukautta, kunnes seuraava osa ilmestyy. Kaksi pientä tyttöä on kuusiosaisen Kuoleman käytävän ensimmäinen osa. Siinä oikeastaan luodaan vain miljöö jatko-osien tapahtumille – niin ainakin oletan. Ensimmäinen osa ei anna juurikaan vinkkiä, miten tari ...more
Tyler Dolmseth
I think this book should have gone longer. It was a tedious read and long worded, therefore sometimes got tiring but was very enjoyable. It is a very mysterious and powerful read as it plunges you into the eight part series. It keeps you hooked but seems to drag on in some parts with useless information. I plan on continuing the series as soon as volume two is returned to the class. I think Stephen king could have gone into deeper detail with John's supposed murder but leaves gaps that I feel wi ...more
Taddow
I tried reading a Stephen King book long ago (I think it was Cujo) and I absolutely did not like it- I did not know if it was the story, the writing style, or my mindset but I did not finish it and barely made it into the first fifty pages. Years, years later, my wife (who is a big Stephen King fan (after hearing about my prior experience with his work) suggested that I give the first installment of the Green Mile a try. I will admit that it was an enjoyable read and I think I'll continue with t ...more
Bruce M
Jun 01, 2013 Bruce M rated it 5 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Stephen King fans, Fans of the movie, Everyone that loves books.
This is my first time re-reading this book since '96, when it first came out. Like any fan of comic books, I still love the concept of serial story telling, and absolutely loved this little experiment that Stephen King ran back then.

While this first volume mostly introduces the characters, it does a fantastic job at doing so. We get a clear picture of what "regular" life on the Green Mile at Cold Mountain Penitentiary was like. King's Paul Edgecombe character is a fantastic narrator. He tells a
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Lauren
Sep 30, 2009 Lauren rated it 3 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Stephen King readers, people who enjoy slightly horrific tales
Recommended to Lauren by: We watched the movie in Current Events
When I first came upon The Green Mile, it was in the form of something book fans dread most: the movie. Though it was relevant (we were studying the death penalty) and I had to watch it anyway, I actually really enjoyed the movie. Now that I've picked up the book, I'm hoping my mind will let me forget all the details of the movie so I can read them! ;D
This is the first book, focusing on the arrival of John Coffey, a man accused of raping and killing nine year old twin girls. Upon meeting him,
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Elizabeth
Liked it. Just such a good read. It revolves around a central theme of the nature of evil. Does evil originate in individuals or systems? The main character Paul Edgecombe, the death row supervisor, goes from a firm conviction in the former to gradually swinging to the latter. He recognises the death penalty is applied in a way that shows up society's racism, that the state disproportionately executes it's non-white citizens, usually black. However, like most supporters of the death penalty, he ...more
Julia Brumfield
This was actually one of the most interesting and captivating books that I have read from Stephen King & I highly recommend it for any King fans.

I ended up getting this book from a thrift store and normally following the rules of serial books I was only able to get the last three books for the first three were nowhere in sight. As a result I started off reading "The Bad Death of Eduard Delacroix" first and I was caught up in the story, knowing the one main aspect of the book and yet not kn
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Katia
J’adore le film du même nom, notamment parce que je suis totalement fan de Tom Hanks, mais aussi parce que c’est une histoire vraiment sublime. J’étais donc très heureuse de pouvoir découvrir le roman à l’origine de ce film et il a amplement dépassé mes espérances. J’en profite pour remercier ma Doodie de ma l’avoir prêté ! J’ai décidé de faire un article pour chaque épisode, ainsi je donnerai mon opinion à chaque fois, même si chaque épisode est très court.

Ce roman est construit d’une façon ass
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Trisha
Inhoud:
"In de brede gang door het midden van blok E lag linoleum met de kleur van verschrompelde oude limoenen. Wat in andere gevangenissen de laatste mijl wordt genoemd, heette in Cold Mountain dan ook 'De groene mijl'.

"Hoe zou het zijn", vroeg ik me af,"om die laatste veertig meter naar de elektrische stoel te lopen, wetend dat je daar zal sterven? En hoe zou de man zich voelen die de veroordeelde op de stoel moest vastsjorren, of de man die de schakelaar overhaalt?"

Waardering:
Dit boek kwam in
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Victoria
i found all six books at a thrift store shortly after having read Under the Dome. i knew immediately i had to read something else by king. however for those of you who have read Under the Dome know how differnt the books are. i came to the table expecting soemthibg completely different from what i received. it was a pleasent surprise but i some how expected more the details although good were missing but i keep reminding myself there are after all six books....off to book two.
Justin Christman
Saw the movie years ago, and loved it. I am now just getting around to reading the book. I came across the 6 part series in a used book store in Cheyenne, Wyoming last summer.

As soon as I turned the first page I couldn't wait to get to the next part. Now I will start Part 2. I cant wait to learn more about that mouse I already know about from seeing the movie, but I still can't wait to see how it is delivered by King, and recreated in my mind.
Tyler Dolmseth
I thought this was a very good book. The idea of mortality is very construed because it is told from the first person perspective of a death row guard. His life seemed pretty normal except for his urinary infection, until this black giant of a man was sentenced to death and put on his block. He has a hard time trying to figure him out with his innocent and almost harmless ways (except for his size).
John
This is the first part of the 6 part novel of The Green Mile. In it, a huge convicted rapist and murderer, John Coffey, is sent to death row in what the other prisoners call the "green mile." I rated this book 4 stars because this one part is well written and has an amazing plot line. I recommend this book to anyone who has read any other Stephen King book or has seen the movie.
Timmy De Leon
This is a good start for a serial thriller. The story takes place at the state penitentiary at Cold Mountain. We get to see the story at the point of view of Paul Edgecombe, one of the prison wardens who take charge of prisoners who were about to sit on Old Sparky's lap---getting executed on an electric chair. I got introduced to the characters: Paul, Harry, Dean, Brutal, Old Toot-Toot, Eduard Delacroix, Percy, and John Coffey.

In this part of The Green Mile, the story tell us about the crime of
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Jess
Another notch on the Stephen King belt! I'm reading "The Green Mile" in its original serialized form, but I hope to finish it all by the end of this month (my father's fiancee's daughter gave them all to me after doing some cleaning). Alas, this isn't much of a review, since it is like reading a chapter from a novel. But "The Two Dead Girls" certainly got me hooked into the story of John Coffey and the horrible thing he did, which was King's intention when he started writing a serialized story. ...more
Brian Schwartz
The main characters – including the mouse – are introduced and developed. We learn from Paul’s narrative that Eduard Delacroix is going to die badly. But we don’t know how. The story will move forward in the second volume, The Mouse on the Mile.

At the end of each book, King poses a question to his readers. Readers are invited to submit 50 word essays answering the questions. The best essay will win an autographed copy of The Green Mile Manuscript. The question at the end of Two Dead Girls is, “W
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Melanie
I started reading this and didn't realize that The Green Mile is compromised of six short stories. I will rate these indivdually and The Green Mile as a whole. I enjoyed the story of The Two Dead Girls, but felt there was much left out - things I should already know and much that is foreshadowed. Even as a short story it needs a bit more. I have the basic plot, but not really in the know of what happens at this point.
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Stephen Edwin King was born the second son of Donald and Nellie Ruth Pillsbury King. After his father left them when Stephen was two, he and his older brother, David, were raised by his mother. Parts of his childhood were spent in Fort Wayne, Indiana, where his father's family was at the time, and in Stratford, Connecticut. When Stephen was eleven, his mother brought her children back to Durham, M ...more
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