Fondazione e Terra
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Fondazione e Terra (Foundation (Publication Order) #5)

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3.96 of 5 stars 3.96  ·  rating details  ·  26,758 ratings  ·  433 reviews
No ISBN edition of ISBN-13: 9788804326342
Exiled Councilman Trevize, having found Gaia, a world inhabited by telepathic beings, journeys onwards with his companions in their quest for new knowledge of the mysterious planet Earth. As they near their destination, Bliss the Gaian begins to pick up the thought waves of intelligent beings - but are they human? What new mysterie...more
Hardcover, 400 pages
Published July 1988 by Club degli Editori su licenza Mondadori (first published January 1984)
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Wesleyaboyer
I loved the first 3 foundation novels. But this one, and to a lesser but still significant extent, the previous one, were awful.

Have you seen the first season of the tv show 24?

It follows various characters through 24 straight hours of an action packed day. Jack Bauer, the main character, is doing whatever the main plot of the season is, saving the president or whatever.

All the while, as filler, other things are happening. The worst of all are the ridiculous storylines following his daughter, wh...more
Kevin Slater
The last of the Foundation books in order of sequence and the best book of the series. Reading about it online some people complain about the lack of an ending that satisfies questions brought up in the series but I think it ends splendidly. I also felt that we have a great conclusion to the question of why Earth and Gaia, the purpose of the Seldon plan and what the Robots were doing and why. I can't think of a better conclusion even 500 years before the end of the 1000 years "promised" us from...more
David
Ouch, what a disappointment. I had really enjoyed the plot and characters of "Foundation's Edge" and was looking forward to finishing up the series with this book. Most of the books in the series have their flaws, but are generally pretty entertaining. This final volume has a series of problems.

The plot: There is just enough plot here for a short story. The crew is searching for earth. Why? I forget, and Asimov doesn't remind us, opting instead for pages and pages of unpleasant bickering between...more
Japhy Grant
So, the weakest part of the Foundation series is that Asimov's draws his characters so thinly, they might as well be cartoons. Of course, when the story is spanning centuries and the main character is civilization itself, you don't mind so much.

Unfortunately, Foundation and Earth is the worst of all possible worlds. Instead of millenia, we get a month stuck on a spaceship with three people (if you call a planetary consciousness inhabiting the mind of a sorority girl a person, that is) who in th...more
Tracey
I won't even read the other reviews first (I know from real life what people think of this book compared to the others in Asimov's Foundation series), but it's the only Asimov on my "Favorites" list, and as such it sorta represents the whole Foundation series to me, and deserves to represent because it's proof that a writer can finish a series with no loose ends in a reasonable amount of time SO DAMNED WELL.

(The prequels, I'm not including in the Foundation series; they're optional, and I didn't...more
Tim
I'm about to read the prequels, but as of now, this is the worst of the 5 foundation books i've read. I'll start positive, and say I like the characters. Looking back at the first foundation book, when you may only have 50 pages with a set of characters, and that 50 pages would be almost entirely devoted to weaving a complex plot, it certainly is a huge improvement so spend basically 1000 pages with the same set of characters, almost forming a buddy-buddy situation in which I actually cared abou...more
Jan-Maat
When I read Mostly Harmless I thought it had tied up a bunch of loose ends that on reflection were better off undone. Reading Foundation and Earth wasn't quite the same but what it does is tie together the Foundation series with the Bailey series.

If you've read the rest of those series you might well now scratch your head and wonder anybody would bother to do that. It's like the man who laid carpet in the bathroom and in the garage so it would be consistent with the rest of his home.

It doesn't...more
Derek Davis
The near impossible from Asimov: a boring book. After finding that, after all the intervening years, #4 in the Foundation series had the same spirit as the original trilogy, the damp writing, lack of decent plotting and unlearning characters in #5 are a real let-down.

Three characters – councilor Golan Trevize and historian Janov Pelorat, both from Terminus, and Bliss from the sentient world Gaia – zip around the galaxy looking for Earth, its existence erased form historical records. For about th...more
Steven Peterson
This book by Isaac Asimov is fascinating in two ways--first, it is the last of the Foundation series; second, it is another link between two of the greatest series in science fiction, the Foundation series and the Robot series. As always with Asimov, there are the irritating things--his characters get talky, plot sometimes breaks down, and there is a certain discursive quality to his writing that does not always serve movement of the story well. However, by this point in his career, Asimov was c...more
Ben
When the second Pirates of the Caribbean movie came out, one of the reviewer complaints about how the film failed to acknowledge the difference between drudgery that adds unnecessary time and doesn't advance characters versus dialogue that was about character development and furthering the plot. The scene that epitomized this involved a minute-plus segment where the camera followed two minor characters in a rowboat as they made the entire trip to shore, adding nothing and extending running lengt...more
Tfitoby
The End.

This 15 book sequence is missing only those two words. This is later Asimov and you can tell, he really learned how to tell a story by this point. I loved this book, it was easily my favourite of the Foundation books and right up there with the best Lije Baley/R.Daneel Olivaw books.

The excitement of the adventure in this one really captivated me, the journey for Earth something that has been hinted at repeatedly from the early Empire trilogy right through to Trevize and Pelorat finally t...more
Nicholas
I really wanted to give this book like a four, but upon further reflection I just can't. Foundation and Earth is the conclusion of Asimov's masterpiece Foundation Series (I haven't read the two prequels yet) and it takes the series in a completely new direction. Which is wonderful, and also problematic. The Seldon Plan and the Galactic Empire on which the series were founded become side notes, mentioned in parenthesis and trivial in the wake of Golan Trevize's solving the ultimate human mystery...more
Francis Gahren
Foundation and Earth (1986) is a science fiction novel by Isaac Asimov, the fifth novel of the Foundation Series and chronologically the last in the series.

Plot introduction

Several centuries after the events of Second Foundation, two citizens of the Foundation seek to find Earth, the legendary planet where humans are said to have been originated. Interestingly, even less is known about Earth than was the case in Foundation, when scholars still seem to know the location of 'Sol'.

The story follows...more
Katie
Here's what I was waiting for, a more in-depth search for Earth, and getting to chuckle at the characters saying that a planetary system with a gas giant with enormous bright rings and a habitable planet with a huge satellite was pretty much impossible. Fun to think about the unique beauty of our solar system. And there was plenty of questioning of the weird new age Gaia crap, though it was never completely shot down. There was also the illustration of how going to far in the other direction and...more
Evangeline
My rating: 3.5. This was an excellent ending to the series, but I didn't enjoy it as much as the earlier books, perhaps because there was too much astronomy and computing in it. Nevertheless, it was a good yarn and full of interesting ideas. Having chosen Galaxia as the future of humanity, Trevize embarks on a quest to find Earth, the mythical planet of human origins, in the hope of discovering the reason for his choice. Accompanied by Pelorat and Bliss, he first goes to Comporellon and hears th...more
Pamela Deters
A galaxy full of human beings and nobody knows where they originated from. There are many myths concerning a possible place called Earth but it's not on any of the charts of the galaxy. Our hero of Foundation's Edge, Golan Trevize, returns on a quest for Earth feeling that if he finds Earth he will understand why he made the great Choice of Foundation's Edge. Once the legendary place is found, Trevize will understand his Choice and he will be shocked at who has really been manipulating the galax...more
Jenna
A well-written novel that it certainly made me buy the whole series. If you like to read science fiction, the series of this book you don't want to miss.!

Golan Trevize expedition was to search the earth......the mythical home of the forebears, expecting to find the answer that he's been searching for, but no one could tell if indeed existed. No traces can be found even ancient writings from the past. He must prove humanity's ancestral planet or everything he believe in will be lost.



Andrew O
Asimov said in the beginning of this book that he never intended to write more foundation stories after the first 3 books. And you can tell he is just going through the motions of writing a story here.

I really liked the first 3 books, which are actually all short story collections about The Foundation. But the 4th and 5th books are one long story. Asimov just does not seem to be able to write long stories, he is not able to develop characters well enough to keep you interested in them once it g...more
-uht!
I was hoping Asimov would move the Foundation story forward with this one, but he ended up writing the longest novel of the series that spanned only a few months of the 1,000 year period. The story is about people searching for the legendary birthplace of humans and it was fun to see them try to unwrap the myths and actually find earth, but the story was ultimately unsatisfying and a bit boring.
Sarah P
What a great septology! The set of stories focuses mostly at the beginning of the fall of the Galactic Empire, and ends at the creation of... something new. From Hari Seldon to Golan Trevize... each story follows characters traveling through space, making discoveries, affecting history, and defeating the odds. A fully satisfying read, (although not a quick read.)
Al Philipson
The original Foundation trilogy was written because Asimov wanted to write it. The extras were written because his publisher wanted more books to capitalize on the popularity of the originals.

This book shows that.

The plot is thin and Asimov had to put in a lot of filler to fill enough pages to make a novel out of it. To do so, he came up with a travelogue; running his main characters from one world to another. Two of the characters have a non-stop discussion/argument about the same blasted thing...more
David Lilly
This last book in the Foundation series was a major let down for me. For one it broke the formula that had been working, basically stepping a generation or so into the future to see how changes made in the last book effected the course of humanity in the future. Instead it follows the cast of characters from the previous book in their on going adventures.

But that's not really what ruined the book for me. What I really didn't like was Asimov's fixation on sex, and sexuality throughout the book. S...more
Kerry Evans
Very disappointing - should have been one third the size it is and even then questions should have been raised about the publication. I loved the original Foundation stories this is not a worthy ending to the series
Duncan Mandel
EDITORIAL REVIEW:

The fifth novel in Asimov's popular Foundation series opens with second thoughts. Councilman Golan Trevize is wondering if he was right to choose a collective mind as the best possible future for humanity over the anarchy of contentious individuals, nations and planets. To test his conclusion, he decides he must know the past and goes in search of legendary Earth, all references to which have been erased from galactic libraries. The societies encountered along the way become arg...more
Miguel Duarte
Well, this book is a whole different beast from the original trilogy. Foundation's Edge had already been slightly different, but Foundation and Earth feels like a completely separate book. It is quite slow-paced, and looking back I think that it could definitely be shorter. It seems that it was written so that the reader doesn't really need to have a thorough understanding of the previous books. The first couple hundred pages are quite repetitive in the discussions between Trevize and Bliss, and...more
Kevin Xu
The book ended with possibilities of things yet to come as one plot ends, another opens up.
Christopher
A somewhat less-than-satisfying conclusion to the Foundation series that kind of plods along as the search for Earth continues. While the novel suggests that finding Earth will bring answers, they're not terribly satisfying and things are left somewhat as they were when the novel begins. While there's something of a cliffhanger ending, the build-up to it as the characters flit from world to world is a bit repetitive and without sufficient payoff either in the individual scenes or upon the actual...more
Troy
All of the best parts of Asimov (incredible ideas, space exploration, musings on human nature) with the added advantage of one consistent set of protagonists - allowing for real bonding with the characters. Although I don't like Trevize much as a person, I felt I really understood him and his motivation, and he made a great viewpoint from which to see the universe. I felt genuinely sad at finishing this series, which is always the indicator of a great book. Reality didn't quite feel real any mor...more
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Spatial Jump 1 43 Jan 12, 2012 05:08AM  
  • Foundation's Triumph (Second Foundation Trilogy, #3)
  • Inferno (Isaac Asimov's Caliban, #2)
  • Foundation's Fear (Second Foundation Trilogy, #1)
  • Sunstorm (A Time Odyssey, #2)
  • Foundation and Chaos (Second Foundation Trilogy, #2)
  • The Ringworld Throne (Ringworld, #3)
  • The Annals of the Heechee (Heechee Saga, #4)
  • Green Mars (Mars Trilogy, #2)
  • Citizen of the Galaxy
  • Diamond Mask (Galactic Milieu Trilogy, #2)
16667
Isaac Asimov was a Russian-born, American author, a professor of biochemistry, and a highly successful writer, best known for his works of science fiction and for his popular science books.

Professor Asimov is generally considered the most prolific writer of all time, having written or edited more than 500 books and an estimated 90,000 letters and postcards. He has works published in nine of the te...more
More about Isaac Asimov...
Foundation (Foundation, #1) I, Robot (Robot, #0.1) Foundation and Empire (Foundation, #2) Second Foundation (Foundation, #3) The Foundation Trilogy (Foundation, #1-3)

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