The Bear Who Shared
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The Bear Who Shared

3.83 of 5 stars 3.83  ·  rating details  ·  288 ratings  ·  64 reviews
Norris the bear has been waiting patiently for the last ripe fruit to fall from the tree. But Tulip the raccoon and Violet the mouse have too . . . although maybe not so patiently. In fact, Tulip and Violet sniff, listen to, and even hug the fruit. Norris catches the fruit when it finally falls, and because he is a wise bear, he shares it and makes two new friends.

A lovel...more
Hardcover, 32 pages
Published March 17th 2011 by Dial (first published March 1st 2010)
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Brittany Watts
This is book was a picture book. I believe for children ranging in ages 3-5. The book was about a wise bear named Norris who sat patiently waiting for the plorringe to fall from the tree. As he waited a mouse named Tulip and a Raccoon named Violet also noticed the plorringe and wanted it too. When the plorringe fell from the tree Norris shared it with Tulip and Violet and from that moment on the three of them shared everything. I rated this book five stars because it teaches children ata young a...more
Pat (Get Kids to Read) Tierney
Rayner, Catherine. The Bear Who Shared. New York: Dial for Young Readers, 2011. Print.
This review is also posted on Get Kids to Read

Grades PK-K
The Bear who Shared by Catherine Rayner is a book about sharing. There is a delicious fruit hanging above a wise old bear. The wise old bear knows how tasty the fruit will be and he waits for something to happen. The delicious fruit attracts a few other animals and when the fruit falls, bear shares and they become friends.
This is a decent book, there are...more
The Library Lady
Prettier than the Berenstain Bears, bur nearly as preachy.
Tasha
Norris, the bear, knew that the plorringes were the best fruits. So he waited under the plorringe tree because he knew something special was going to happen. Tulip and Violet, a mouse and a raccoon, knew that plorringes were the best too. They were able to climb up in the tree to get closer to the single hanging plorringe. They could see how delicious it looked and smell its delicious scent. They listened to it and hugged it too. They were just about to lick it when it fell off of the tree and d...more
Gabby
The Bear who Shared is a story about Norris the wise bear who loved plorringes, which are delicious fruit that fall from trees. He patiently waits for one plorringe to fall, but he was not the only one who loved plorringes. Violet and Tulip loved them too, and they were also waiting for the plorringe to fall. However, they did not wait patiently like Norris did. They sniffed, listened, and hugged the plorringe while Norris waited under the tree for it to fall. Finally the plorringe falls and lan...more
Kelsey
Norris the bear waits for a ripe delicious fruit under a tree. A mouse and raccoon smell and hug the fruit. Just as they are about to take a bit, it falls on Norris' head. Norris could eat the fruit himself, but he decides to share. Norris makes two new friends and they all share the fruit. Children will enjoy the colorful illustrations and learn an important lesson about sharing. The story is simple and features minimal text. It could be used to promote print motivation.
Heidi
I suppose this could be a little didactic, but it works. Its simplicity in text and illustration is endearing and sweet. And just to make sure I was right, I looked up "plorringe." (It IS a made-up fruit.) I think this is worth including in one of my preschool storytimes, because it can't hurt to throw in a "be nice" lesson among the scads of my silly choices. :-)

5/7/14: I was worried that the Manners theme would be too didactic, so this book actually turned out to be NOT didactic compared to th...more
Julie
The Bear Who Shared quietly promotes patience, sharing, and friendship - important skills for all young children. Both adults and children will be drawn in by the stunning illustrations. Rayner brings her forest friends to life with her watercolor and ink drawings, and manages to depict a wide range of emotions (curiosity, boredom, surprise) with a few simple lines.
Romelle
I loved the simple, whimsical illustrstions of Catherine Rayner. It is unique and fun. The story, however, was quiet and simple. I liked the simple story of Bear waiting patiently for the last fruit on the tree. The message of patience, kindness, and sharing are all wonderful attributes of this book. But in this age of picture books where quirky, unique story lines dominate, I felt this book was slight and predictable. Yet, I have to point out Rayner's mastery of beautiful language intertwined t...more
Marjorie
I love a book that can encourage good habits and this one does just that. Sharing can often be difficult for young children, but this story has a bear who is not only wise, but also kind. He makes new friends by sharing a delicious fruit, the imaginary plorringe. I know it's imaginary because I had to look it up on Google because I had never heard of such a fruit. Rarely do I need to research anything I read in a children's book, but this strange word had me scratching my head, and knowing child...more
Candice
Jul 14, 2011 Candice rated it 5 of 5 stars
Recommends it for: Sophie
Shelves: picture-books
This is a beautiful book all around - both story and illustrations. It's a simple story of Norris, the wise old bear who is patiently waiting for a juicy, ripe "plorringe" to fall from the tree. Tulip and Violet, a mouse and a raccoon, are not quite so patient. They climb the tree, but can't stand to wait too long before they reach out to lick that lovely fruit - and it falls right onto Norris's head! Wise Norris is also kind, and he shares his delicious treat with Tulip and Violet, making two n...more
Barbara
While Norris, a wise bear, waits patiently under a tree for a plorringe to fall, Violet and Tulip, a mouse and a raccoon, respectively, climb out on the limb where the fruit is hanging and watch it. As they draw nearer and nearer and are just about ready to taste its juicy goodness, the fruit falls onto Norris. Rather than devouring it all himself, he gently shares with the other two, making friends of them all. While the lesson about sharing is quite clear, it's delivered in such an appealing w...more
Megan
The illustrations elevate this gentle (if somewhat preachy) story about sharing a perfectly ripe fruit, but I couldn't help imagining Wilfred Brimley as Norris the bear. Happily, the illustrations provide the mischief and humor that much of the text is lacking. The pages describing Tulip and Violet's exploration of the 'plorringe' are very well done. I found myself wanting the two smaller and presumably younger creatures, to scamper away with the fruit, but instead it drops right into wise old N...more
Megan
Jun 06, 2011 Megan rated it 3 of 5 stars
Recommended to Megan by: MUTPL storytime
Monticello Public Library-Toddler Storytime-June 6, 2011

Norris wants to eat a plorringe (sp? I was holding a toddler as the book was being read, so I didn't get to check the spelling of this fictional fruit). He waits patiently until a mouse and a raccoon knock it down and he grabs it. But because he is so wise (as repeated several times in the book), he knows he will enjoy the plorringe if he shares it with the mouse and raccoon. In the end he gets a yummy treat AND two new friends.

Love the ill...more
Bridget R. Wilson
Waiting is the name of the game for Norris, a very wise bear. The plorringe will fall. He just has to be patient. But what about Tulip and Violet? Can a very wise bear also be a good sharer?

What I thought: I like it. The story has a good moral without being preachy. Bear books are my favorites. I think Norris would be good friends with Bonny Becker's Bear (of Bear and Mouse fame). The illustrations are lovely. The colors are soft and Rayner makes excellent use of white space. My favorite illustr...more
Nielson
Norris is a wise old bear who waits patiently for a plorringe to fall from the tree. Tulip and Violet, a raccon and mouse, also want the plorringe but aren't as patient as wise old Norris. With the help of Norris, they all get some plorringe plus a friend.
Good story that could be great for a lesson on values like patience, sharing, and kindness. I loved Tulip and Violets curiosity over the plorringe, although I thought choosing a "plorringe" as a fruit was slightly confusing. Outstanding illust...more
Ginna
Jul 22, 2013 Ginna added it
Shelves: spring
I liked the illustrations and the words of the story. I would change the title, so it won't be so predictable, but still a good book. I could use it to talk about the importance of sharing, but also I could use it for my science lesson on growing plants.

I would talk about fruits and how they grow. I would also talk about the patience you need to have, until the tree gives fruit. I will bring different fruit to the classroom for the students to see, smell and taste! They will share and take turns...more
Ina
This is an absolutely charming story told through large, simple, deep orange text and lovely soft watercolors. Wise Norris the bear and two other characters are waiting for the last plorringe hanging on a tree. The descriptions of the plorringe are beautiful - plorringes are, "as soft as cotton candy" and smell, "of honey and sunny days." This is a beautiful book about patience and friendship.
Ian
Rote text, breath-taking illustrations.
Kim T.
Great message!
Melissa
OUTSTANDING illustrations. Love, love, love them! Excellent color, composition, and expression. I need to see more of her work!

The story is familiar but just fine (the sequence where Tulip and Violet, ansty with waiting, hug and nearly nearly lick the fruit is great) but clonks down into telling-not-showing didacticism in the last few pages.

The illustrations are 5 stars, the text is 3 stars until the ending, which is 1 star.
Jane G Meyer
I am in love with this book. It's silly, and the illustrations are just favoloso. You can read it in a wisp, or take your time marveling at the art. And it's about sharing, and about plorringes. My kind of book. I found this at the library, but would spend money on it in a minute for a toddler. This kind of book can be read 1,000 times and the adult won't keel over from tedium and disgust.
Cathy
Norris is a wise and patient bear. He is also kind so when the last ripe fruit falls from the tree, Norris shares with Tulip and Violet (who have also been waiting but not quite as patiently) and makes two new friends in the bargain. Catherine Rayner's simple story is gently supported by the soft and quietly textured illustrations. Lovely.
Melanie
Norris is a wise bear who realizes that even though Tulip and Violet, the raccoon and mouse, are expressing extreme interest in his piece of fruit, they will all have to wait until it is ripe and falls from the tree. And of course Norris, being a wise bear is also kind and shares.
Beth
The expression "Less is more" certainly applies to this quiet, yet delightful little picture book about a wise bear who chooses to share his bounty rather than keeping it for himself. What he gains from sharing, rather than hoarding his find, is two new friends.
Liza Gilbert
The story of three animals waiting for fruit to fall from the tree is about as exciting as watching grass grow. However, Rayner's watercolor and ink art is stunning. This is a book best read by inventing your own story to go along with the amazing illustrations.
Danielle
A sweet story with great pictures of animals who make new friends by sharing.
Julie
This book would be good for a "context clues" lesson as many children do not know what a Plorringe tree. That is the fruit that the kind bear shared! The water color paintings are pretty abstract.
Read  Ribbet
Rayner's book is beautifully illustrated as it tells with carefully chosen words that feature wonderful verbs and sensory language a universal story of sharing and friendship.
Jess
the child-like illustrations and the simple text worked beautifully together to create a sweet story. a great read alike for those who enjoy Karma Wilson's "Bear" books.
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Award winning author and illustrator Catherine Rayner studied Illustration at Edinburgh College of art. She fell in love with the city and still lives there with her husband, young son and a handful of creatures: Shannon the horse, Ena the grey cat and a goldfish called Richard.

She finds huge inspiration in her pets and often uses them as models, frequently asking Ena to pose so that she can study...more
More about Catherine Rayner...
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