The Sentry (Elvis Cole, #12, Joe Pike, #3)
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The Sentry (Elvis Cole #12)

4.18 of 5 stars 4.18  ·  rating details  ·  10,109 ratings  ·  659 reviews
In The Watchman and The First Rule, Robert Crais put Joe Pike front and center for the first time, to remarkable effect: ?A beautifully crafted piece of story-telling? (The Seattle Times); ?A high-octane thriller... Pike's unshakable belief in right and wrong provides a moral center? (South Florida Sun-Sentinel); ?Joe Pike is a joy to watch, an urban Zen warrior priest rig...more
Audio CD, 7 pages
Published January 11th 2011 by Brilliance Corporation
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(showing 1-30 of 3,000)
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Dan Schwent
While stopping to air up a tire, Joe Pike sees two men beating up a restaurant owner. Pike intervenes, falls for the owner's niece, and gets himself and Elvis Cole entangled in an FBI investigation involving a street gang and stolen drug money. Only everything Pike and Cole think they know is wrong...

I'll be honest. I read one Robert Crais book before this one and wasn't completely sold. For most of that book, the Monkey's Raincoat, I thought Elvis Cole was little more than a ripoff of Robert Pa...more
Lance Greenfield
This is the first Robert Crais that I have read, and I enjoyed it very much. It is certainly action-packed and fast-paced from the very first page. There is a lot of brutal violence involved, and plenty of blood.

The hero, Joe Pike, watches out for the oppressed. He is a very tough guy, and I would certainly prefer to have him as a friend than an enemy. Surprisingly, for such a character, he sometimes lets his heart lead his mind. His supporter, Elvis Cole, is tough too, but seems more analytical...more
Michael
Joe Pike spots two men go into a store. By their body language he can tell that they are planning to do something malicious. When Joe enters the store to check it out, he finds the men have the store owner on the floor and are beating him.

Joe dispatches one of the men and the other runs away. The one man is arrested but later gets out on bail.

That night someone throws a can of paint through the store window.

The owner's niece, Dru Rayne, speaks to Joe and Joe offers to help. He learns that the me...more
Jodi Langston
What can I say about The Sentry except it was good. We got another glimpse into the mysterious Joe Pike and the deep bonds that hold Joe and Elvis together. It was what we all have come to expect from a Robert Crais novel…an action packed, exciting ride to a heart stopping finish with twists and turns along the way that you won‘t see coming.
As a writer I like to try and figure out what will happen next and where this ride is taking me, but as always I was stumped by the master storyteller and hu...more
Sandi
I really don't know of a more readable author than Robert Crais. Even though I had a few quibbles with some of the plotting I could not turn the pages fast enough.
Jeffrey
A terrific novel featuring Joe Pike and Elvis Cole but in a few ways a little too pat so I ended up giving it 4 stars instead of 5 stars

Pike interrupts some gang members beating up a man, Wilson Smith, in a sandwich shop. He decides to intervene in Smith's problems because of Dru, a young woman who is the man's niece. Pike meets with a local gang boss who promises Pike that he will get his young men to leave the Smith and Dru alone, but instead Smith and Dru disappear and Pike goes on the hunt...more
Lisa
I do love my detectives and their tough-guy sidekicks: Nero Wolfe and Archie Goodwin, Spenser and Hawk, and now Elvis Cole and Joe Pike. Elvis Cole is an ex-Ranger with a Mickey Mouse phone, a bright yellow Corvette and a troubled past Joe Pike is his silent partner — dark shades, distinctive tattoos and very few words. The bonus for fans like me is that Robert Crais has taken the sidekick in his popular detective series and given him a series of his own — double the reading, double the pleasure...more
Jeanette  "Astute Crabbist"
I had two favorite lines in this one. First was when the guy who drives a Prius says, "Go green, Mr. Pike, the planet needs love." HA! I just can't picture Joe Pike, all six-foot-one-inch, 200 pounds of him, tooling around in a little black Prius. Doesn't go with the image.

My other favorite line is the great truth: "Men stayed sharp when it came to money. Men got stupid when it came to women." Even Pike is not immune.

That SNAG (Sensitive New Age Guys) moment at the end was just too tender, was...more
Rex Fuller
This is one of the most carefully plotted of all of the Cole/Pike series. I read it some time ago and it still sticks with me. Really did not know who to trust among the other characters. Reversals abounded. Great book.
Randy
Joe Pike had stopped to put some air in a tire when he noticed a pair of tattooed bangers across the street looking suspicious. His spider sense was going off as they entered a sandwich shop across the street.When he enters, he finds them stomping an older man on the floor.

Naturally that can't go on.

He breaks one's arm that comes at him and the other runs.

The little shop is run by Dru Raine and her uncle, Wilson. It's the old protection racket and Pike takes it upon himself to protect them. A vi...more
Paige Turner
This is Robert Crais third Joe Pike novel.

Joe Pike is an ex-mercenery and cop who co-owns a private detective agency in Los Angelas with Elvis Cole, the private detective of the team. Traditionally Joe has always been the quiet reserved partner who is very capable and usually called upon to act in a pretty violent manner to solve an issue – which I might add he does very well.

In this book Joe takes the lead on investigating a girl, Dru Rayne and her uncle. Joe meets them by chance when he is fil...more
Cathy DuPont
Been loving the series of Elvis Cole and his quiet buddy/friend/business partner, Joe Pike.

It started with Elvis as the headliner and Joe his co-star but this is the third series of Joe as star and Elvis as co-star although Elvis' role in this last book is more predominent than in others.

While Elvis clearly has had a love interest, Joe only love interest was mentioned because she was murdered. So our interest is stirred as soon as he seems interested in a woman he meets. Because of the situati...more
Barbara
This is my first foray into the world of Joe Pike, former Recon Marine, and PI Elvis Cole, and I loved every minute of it. Pike is attempting to protect two people, Dru Rayne and her uncle, who've opened a small store after fleeing Louisiana and the devastation Hurricane Katrina wrought. However, they run afoul of local gangbangers and Pike steps in to ensure they'll be left alone.

However, after some investigative work by Cole, Pike realizes that Rayne and her uncle aren't who they say they are...more
Jules
One just can't help loving Joe Pike! This is my favourite series by far and in The Sentry Crais proves once again what an amazing story-teller he is. I couldn't put it down and read it in one sitting. The crime story is what keeps you on the edge of your seat but what really drives this series are its characters, especially the strong friendship between Elvis and Joe and the things their actions reveal about them as persons. That's really what makes me come back every time. Wanting to know more...more
Voula
As always, Crais moves the story along nicely with enough suspense and unanswered questions to quickly propel the reader along. In typical Crais style the characters are all really well-developed with their own distinct personalities. (Think Jared.) That said, The Sentry was not, though, at the top of my list of favorite Robert Crais novels (maybe not a favorite, but still good enough to merit four stars). The main premise of the story was just not believable. That Pike could have developed such...more
Marleen
If Joe Pike had not needed air for his tire he wouldn’t have stopped at the service station and he wouldn’t have seen the two men, obvious gang-members, enter the sandwich shop. If he had not seen them enter he would not have followed them, interrupted them while they were beating up a man and have had one of them arrested. If none of that had happened, he wouldn’t have met Dru Rayne, the beaten man’s niece, he wouldn’t have found himself falling for her and he would not have been in the trouble...more
Grey853
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Leon Aldrich
Just can't get enough of Joe Pike pulping the bad guys. Now if only I could get a copy of The Monkey's Raincoat.
Jessica
The Joe Pikes definitely have much more of a thriller flavor than Crais's Elvis Cole series, but I really enjoy them - there's something eternally compelling about that hunter/hunted narrative that I keep returning to.
Larry
Joe Pike, Elvis Cole's hard-as-nails inscrutable partner (love the tattooed arrows) gets his second novel ("The Watchman" was the first). He's always been a presence (in "L.A. Requiem" he easily had equal billing with Cole), but his central presence guarantees a harder, faster novel (even) than the Cole-fronted novels (of which there are eleven). When "The Sentry" opens, Pike notices two men case and then enter a Venice, Calif., sandwich shop. Pike (former US Marine, mercenary soldier, and forme...more
Dale
Relentlessly paced

The Elvis Cole/Joe Pike series continues with The Sentry. Technically, it is a Joe Pike novel, but as with most of the books in this series, you get a little bit of both.

Joe Pike stumbles into a gang intimidation racket (the famed "give us money or your restaurant gets damaged" routine) in progress and, of course, the two fools actually attempt to fight Pike.

When the police come to arrest the one assailant that Pike captures the victim refuses to cooperate with the police. Pike...more
N. E.
Dec 06, 2010 N. E. rated it 4 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Lee Child's Jack Reacher fans
Recommended to N. by: have read his books for years
(Book received from Goodreads) Nothing is as it seems in Robert Crais' new book The Sentry. His second book to feature Joe Pike, Elvis Cole's sidekick, begins with a murder in New Orleans and quickly moves to LA several years later. Joe would never have been involved at all if it weren't for a leaky tire putting him in place to observe and end an assault on a store-owner. Because the police detective in charge is more interested in bringing down Joe than worrying about the man assaulted, Joe is...more
Larry Hoffer
I love it when a book surprises me, I really do, and it's always terrific when it's a book by an author I'm a fan of. But then again, there is definitely something to be said for writers who deliver consistently great books each time; nothing too different, just the right blend of action and plot, with characters you grow attached to from book to book.

I'm a big fan of Robert Crais' books featuring wisecracking but sensitive PI Elvis Cole, and his partner, former policeman-turned-mercenary-turned...more
Johnny
Robert Crais wants to have it both ways. He wants every Joe Pike or Elvis Cole novel to stand on its own and he wants all of us avid readers to understand the ongoing character development that takes place in the meta-universe of the books. These are excellent books. I devour them, but I’ve never bothered to find all of them together and check all of the copyright dates to get the order correct. I suppose I could even find a website and see what the order is supposed to be. But that just seems l...more
T.L. Cooper
Robert Crais kidnaps the reader once again in The Sentry, but the reader doesn't wish to be rescued, well unless Joe Pike and Elvis Cole are the rescuers. The reader feels like they are protected from the injustices of the world while visiting with old friends, Joe Pike and Elvis Cole, in this adventure filled with twists and turns. Crais lets the reader see just enough of Pike to want more but not enough to solve the mystery of Pike. The mystery of Pike and the humor of Cole are much of what ke...more
Giovanni Gelati
Am I a sucker for a Joe Pike novel or what? Yes I am and like many of you I marked the release date on my calendar and waited patiently to get my hands on it. I buzzed through it and, well, let me just hold off on my thoughts for a little bit. Let’s get to what is inside the covers first:
“Dru Rayne and her uncle fled to L.A. after Hurricane Katrina; but now, five years later, they face a different danger. When Joe Pike witnesses Dru's uncle beaten by a protection gang, he offers his help, but ne...more
Mike (the Paladin)
Another good action adventure with Pike and Cole. I must admit that I got interested in the series more following Joe Pike than E. C. I suspect that both these characters have readers who are more interested in one than the other. The writer presents both of them realistically yet without wearing us out relating detail (though I am thoroughly informed now about Joe's running and dietary habits....I don't need to hear it again. But I suppose I will.)

Here Joe gets involved with a...wait a minute,...more
Harry
Ok, a few rambling thoughts on Robert Crais. Who is this guy, where'd he come from, how'd he get so popular? Well the first thing to know is that Crais is not from California at all. He is a native of Louisiana, grew up in a blue collar family, and read his first crime novel The Little Sister when he was 15. And that's all it took. Chandler gave him his love for writing. Other authors that have inspired him were Hammett, Hemingway (seems like that's true of all the crime writers), Parker, and St...more
Barbara
Well, where to begin? I am a fan of Robert Crais, but I don't like everything he writes equally. I love Elvis Cole, I like Joe Pike and I really dislike his stand alones. But that's just me.
This is a Joe Pike book--so I knew going in that it would be a bit of a downer in mood and tone; there would be lots of violence, etc. But, lordy, lordy--some one get Crais some anti-depressant medication!
The action starts with Pike coming to the aid of a deli owner who is being beaten by two local hoods. And...more
Heidi
Whilst this novel is fast paced with lots of twits and turns in the plot and delivers lots of action, I found it somehow bleak and missed the usual tongue-in-cheek character of Elvis Cole. I think I much prefer Joe Pike to remain in the shadows as a bit of an enigma rather than the central character. I found his motives in this novel very hard to understand - here is this hard core character who does not hesitate to kill if it is in the name of justice or defending innocent lives, and yet he get...more
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Robert Crais is the author of the best-selling Elvis Cole novels. A native of Louisiana, he grew up on the banks of the Mississippi River in a blue collar family of oil refinery workers and police officers. He purchased a secondhand paperback of Raymond Chandler’s The Little Sister when he was fifteen, which inspired his lifelong love of writing, Los Angeles, and the literature of crime fiction....more
More about Robert Crais...
The Watchman (Joe Pike, #1) The Monkey's Raincoat (Elvis Cole, #1) The First Rule (Joe Pike, #2) Suspect Taken (Elvis Cole, #13 / Joe Pike, #4)

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