Ma gli androidi sognano pecore elettriche?
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Ma gli androidi sognano pecore elettriche? (Blade Runner #1)

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4.05 of 5 stars 4.05  ·  rating details  ·  132,678 ratings  ·  4,299 reviews
Nel 1992 la Guerra Mondiale ha ucciso milioni di persone, e condannato all'estinzione intere specie, costringendo l'umanità ad andare nello spazio. Chi è rimasto sogna di possedere un animale vivente, e le compagnie producono copie incredibilmente realistiche: gatti, cavalli, pecore...
Anche l'uomo è stato duplicato. I replicanti sono simulacri perfetti e indistinguibili,...more
Paperback, Collezione immaginario Dick, 288 pages
Published January 1st 2000 by Fanucci (first published 1966)
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Scott Sheaffer
I Love Dick. There I've said it. No, not a “Mood Organ” or blood filled skin sack made to facilitate reproduction but Philip K. Dick.

Is it really possible for androids to acquire human traits like empathy and the desire to understand the meaning of life and avoid death at all costs? What would the role of socialism play in an android world? Would self aware androids seek out to destroy anything that threatened their existence or tried to control their thoughts (ie programming)?

A Google search r...more
Kemper
Treasure of the Rubbermaids 20: Failing the Voight-Kampff Test

The on-going discoveries of priceless books and comics found in a stack of Rubbermaid containers previously stored and forgotten at my parent’s house and untouched for almost 20 years. Thanks to my father dumping them back on me, I now spend my spare time unearthing lost treasures from their plastic depths.

In the spirit of Phillip K. Dick‘s questioning of reality and identity, it’s fitting that there are two versions of this story. On...more
Colleen Venable
It takes five full pages for a character to buy a goat and ONE FRIGGIN' SENTENCE for a character to "fall in love". This book was so amazing in the beginning...and then suddenly everything plummeted downhill. It was almost as if Dick got 150 pages in and then said "awwww screw it...uh, sentence, sentence, sentence, THE END!" Why did there need to be any sort of "love" storyline anyway?

Along with being the only geek who made it through puberty without reading Phillip K. Dick books, I also am one...more
Shannon (Giraffe Days)
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Don Rea
Since "Blade Runner" has been one of my favorite movies my entire adult life, it's odd I never read this until now. I expected it to be pretty different from the film, but still, it's not like I don't read SF by the metric ton anyway. I think I just never happened across a copy until recently.

If you've read a lot of SF from the 60s and 70s, you'd know this was written in the late 60s by the end of the first chapter. It has the smell of that period all over it - everyone "official" in any way has...more
Brittany
the k. in philip K. dick definitely stands for kicked ass. but not philip kick ass dick. i dont know what that means.
Szplug
I love Blade Runner—and so it is with pleasure, and a sense of completion, that I am now able to state (almost) the same for its source material. The parenthesized qualifier admits to the differing status of the two: whereas BR is an absolute classic, one that declared itself boldly, influencing the design and feel and look of all subsequent dystopian cinematic fare, a movie cast to perfection and narrowing its gaze to the more umbrageous and feral of Dick's thematic threads, the book casts a wi...more
Andy
I'm worried that most people will misunderstand the intelligence behind this book. I have met a few people who have said, "that book? I read that in high school." My response is "did you understand this book in high school?"

Am I wrong in saying that first, one should read Kafka; second, one should understand how Kafka's fiction functions as a blend of anthropology, theology, and philosophy, among other things. Then, read Phillip K. Dick again, and notice the themes of paranoia, identity crisis,...more
dead letter office
chris's fish died here at work and he seems down. everyone else was mean to the fish (not to its face mostly, just made fun and tapped on the glass) but i always came to see it and i think chris appreciated that for some reason. i've never seen him look so down before. this is one of those things that makes me sad out of all proportion to the scale of the incident, like when i made katy think she was wrong about kansas bordering colorado or when my brother saved his allowance for months and boug...more
Morgan
Jan 01, 2013 Morgan rated it 4 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition Recommends it for: people looking for science fiction with an edge
I've seen "BladeRunner" so many times I could puke and watch it again (hell, I even wrote a 15 page critical analysis of it as a neo noir film). And it's an amazing, beautiful film.

I read "Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep" when I was a junior in highschool, after having grown up with "BladeRunner." And it was fabulous.

"Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep" and "BladeRunner" are not the same thing. At all. Which is conceptually really, really intriguing. And I love that about the two.

By the tim...more
Lit Bug
Post Blade Runner, almost everybody knows of the existential angst of this PKD book – like much modern SF, it questions our notions of what makes us so special as humans, or if there is anything such as human. It asks us if we can ever consider artificially created, mass-produced, identical androids as individuals. And I’m not sure I know all the answers.

On near-future earth, Rick Deckard is a ‘bounty hunter’, a police official who hunts down androids illegally fleeing Mars to find a home on Ear...more
Lynda
"You will be required to do wrong no matter where you go. It is the basic condition of life, to be required to violate your own identity."



Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? is a science fiction masterpiece by Philip K. Dick (PKD) that also served as the inspiration for the movie Blade Runner. It was first published in 1968.

The story is about Rick Deckard, an android killer. He works for the police in San Francisco, where the deadly radioactive dust from World War Terminus still covers the city...more
Justin
Dec 05, 2007 Justin rated it 3 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition Recommends it for: sci fi fans, those interested in bringing down the quality of Bladerunner
Shelves: taught
I've been saying for years that this book is boring. But it's more than that, it's not excusable in the way that a purely boring book can be. Instead, it's a tremendous idea told badly.

It seems that when Dick wrote this he didn't have a good grasp on translating his big ideas into an engrossing--or even active story. It's not that there's no movement in the story. Things happen, but even when they do, even in the throes of the final confrontation, when Deckard is retiring three andys in one aba...more
Ian [Paganus de] Graye
In Which the Emphasis is on Androids Who Grasp the Twin Handles of Empathy

"Deus sive substantia sive natura": Spinoza


Just as in the animal kingdom there is a continuum between humans and animals, there is a continuum in this novel that incorporates humans, androids and electric animals, the main difference being that the latter two are artificial or human constructs.

Here, the androids are organic and sentient. They are not purely electrical or mechanical robots infused with artificial intelli...more
Aloha
“Empathy, he once had decided, must be limited to herbivores or anyhow omnivores who could depart from a meat diet. Because, ultimately, the emphatic gift blurred the boundaries between hunter and victim, between the successful and the defeated.” so states a passage in Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?

The setting of the book is San Francisco in 2021, after World War Terminus have spread radioactive dust over earth. Most of the living creatures have become extinct through exposure to radiation...more
Brandon
After the hellish events of World War Terminus, humanity decided to jump ship and establish colonies on Mars using the assistance of organic based android slaves. Not everyone booked a one way ticket though, several have stayed behind; forced to live among radioactive dust and the ruins of a once prosperous planet.

Despite the bleakness of life on Earth, the one true solace you can take comfort in is owning an honest-to-goodness real life animal. As you can imagine, the price to bring one home ca...more
notgettingenough
Over the last few weeks I’ve read The Luzhin Defense, followed by Bluebeard and then Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?

Originally I was going to write some stuff here about the central characters and compare them with the original Outsider. I was going to say things like this:

Maybe it is a contradiction in terms, to put 3 books about outsiders in the same review, but I can’t stop myself.

We have here a chess player, a doctor who might or might not have murdered a wife and a chickenhead. They al...more
Jason
Ooooooh, i think i get it now! The title "Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?" Is intentionally ambiguous. It wants you to think of "dream" as the notion of sleep, when it's "dream" as palpable hope. The incisive plot threat in the book revolves around a set of androids with the ambition to outlast human beings. It seems like they only want to survive, but their leader--Roy Baty--alludes toward a propagandized theme he led the group with, that Mercer is a fake and without empathy human beings a...more
Werner
May 18, 2008 Werner rated it 3 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition Recommends it for: Fans of serious science fiction
Shelves: science-fiction
While Dick was always a professed Episcopalian, his writing began to take a more distinctly Christian turn only after his spiritual experience in the early 1970s. Here, his outlook is still shaped more by postmodernism, strongly suggesting that simply believing something can make it true. (Paradoxically, it also exudes the strong skepticism, which informed his writing all through his career, as to whether our ordinary human perceptions actually come anywhere close to seeing reality as it actuall...more
Katy
Please note: Originally reviewed in September 2007 (have read it previously a couple times); just copying my review over from Amazon

My Synopsis: In Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?, we find ourselves alternating between two intertwining plot lines. One involves Rick Deckard, a bounty hunter who "retires" escaped androids. The latest model - the Nexus-6 - can only be differentiated from humans through use of a sophisticated psychological testing mechanism that measures empathy levels; empathy...more
Jonathan
Normally I would never go and say the following words. Look away if you are a dedicated bibliophile (like myself) because I am about to say something very taboo. In fact I shall hide it under a spoiler tag because I can.

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(view spoiler)...more
Proustitute
I really wanted to enjoy this book, having heard such wonderful things about it. My recent foray into trying to read more science fiction came at a good time—or so I thought. It was with the desire to be entertained that I began Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? Sadly, I think my next experience with science fiction will definitely have to be with a feminist author given my problems with Dick.

Along the way, I was maddened by how misogynistic the novel is: the many ways in which woman, human o...more
Donna
Empathy, always a hard line to walk. And it's a very interesting experience Philip K. Dick set up for me, not to squirm when the bounty hunter is blowing away the fake beings, but to squirm plenty over that spider. But how fake are those fake beings?
I know I sometimes follow rules I don't quite 'feel' in the belief that not doing so may cause pain to others, even though I don't always get it. It's simply been explained to me, and I've chosen to believe it. I mention this because I've been found...more
Sath
The last nuclear world war has left the world changed, the population is only a fraction of what it once was, so many rooms lie empty and deserted just cluttered with the junk that people left behind. Many animal species are exctinct or close to exctinction, and every household is morally obliged to keep an animal. Many people emmigrated to mars, where android companions and servants are popular. Androids are outlawed on earth, but they sneak in anyway and try to pose as human, until they're dis...more
Benjamin Duffy
It seems to me that a lot of science fiction writers, even well-known and popular ones, aren’t great writers. They’re great at concept and imagination, but not always that good at conveying their imaginings to the reader. One example would be Larry Niven, whose Ringworld quartet I finished a couple of years ago. As captivated as I was by his world-building, I was equally frustrated by his storytelling. The pacing hitched and jerked like an old truck, racing through some parts while draaaaaaaaggi...more
Stephen
3.5 stars. Good novel that may be one of Dick's best work. Don't go into this looking for the movie "Blade Runner" as you will not find it. This is a psychological journey into the meaning being human.

Nominee: Nebula Award for Best Science Fiction Novel (1969)
Leonard
What does it mean to be alive? In Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?, the androids can be as intelligent as humans and the Nexus-6 models embody the next improvements. And they are certainly smarter than the “chickenheads,” humans whose brains radiation has damaged. But in this world, androids couldn’t empathize as humans could. In Star Trek, the Next Generation, the android Data sought to be human through the “emotions chip,” but here Philip K. Dick stresses empathy over other emotions such a...more
Chris
I have kind of a weird confession to make. It's not really a confession as such, since you only confess things that you're ashamed of or that you feel you have done wrong. But this is something that I believe people may find a little odd, so I suppose it's the best word under the circumstances.

I don't kill cockroaches.

Fortunately, I live up on the tenth floor in a nice modern apartment building, so they're not really a problem for me. But even in my old place, where they'd turn up from time to t...more
Guillermo Jiménez
Somos humanos. Desde que nacemos estamos seguros de ello. Tan confiados. Tan ingenuos. Tan imbéciles.

Basta una sencilla pregunta al respecto: ¿qué es ser humano?

En 1968, Philip K. Dick (1928-1982) publica "Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?" y creo que todavía es fecha en que no es reconocido el peso de esta novela.

Dentro de una trama sumamente sencilla, Dick logró lo que muy pocos logran: encapsular aquella cuestión clave que desde los presocráticos venimos arrastrando: ¿qué entendemos por vi...more
Emanuela
Philip K. Dick costringe a fare letture geometriche. In "La svastica sul sole" per piani paralleli, invece, in "Ma gli androidi sognano pecore elettriche?" si deve procedere in orizzontale, poi in verticale e se non bastasse anche in diagonale.

Orizzontale: ci sono uomini e i loro animali che rappresentano solo uno status symbol, per loro gli umani non provano nessun sentimento affettuoso. Poi ci sono gli androidi e gli animali meccanici, questi ultimi sostituiscono quelli vivi ma non bisogna far...more
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Philip K. Dick was born in Chicago in 1928 and lived most of his life in California. He briefly attended the University of California, but dropped out before completing any classes. In 1952, he began writing professionally and proceeded to write numerous novels and short-story collections. He won the Hugo Award for the best novel in 1962 for The Man in the High Castle and the John W. Campbell Memo...more
More about Philip K. Dick...
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“My schedule for today lists a six-hour self-accusatory depression.” 335 likes
“You will be required to do wrong no matter where you go. It is the basic condition of life, to be required to violate your own identity. At some time, every creature which lives must do so. It is the ultimate shadow, the defeat of creation; this is the curse at work, the curse that feeds on all life. Everywhere in the universe.” 248 likes
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