Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.
Start by marking “I quarantanove racconti” as Want to Read:
I quarantanove racconti
Enlarge cover
Rate this book
Clear rating
Open Preview

I quarantanove racconti

4.27 of 5 stars 4.27  ·  rating details  ·  6,301 ratings  ·  188 reviews
Raccolti in volume dall'autore nel 1938, I quarantanove racconti sono stati consacrati dalla critica tra i capolavori piú significativi della narrativa americana. Con la sua straordinaria capacità di reinventare l'esperienza, Hemingway ci restituisce un'umanità varia e vibrante - uomini, donne e adolescenti chiamati tutti a misurarsi in modo diverso con l'asprezza dell'esi ...more
Paperback, Oscar classici moderni, 532 pages
Published 1993 by Arnoldo Mondadori (first published January 1st 1959)
more details... edit details

Friend Reviews

To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

Community Reviews

(showing 1-30 of 3,000)
filter  |  sort: default (?)  |  rating details
Matt
There is a story, probably apocryphal, that Hemingway once bet that he could write an entire short story in six words. He was taken up on that bet, and produced the following diminutive masterpiece: "For Sale: baby shoes. Never used."

I like to believe that story is true.

It's not possible to review the 49 stories in this book, which range in length from dozens of pages to a single paragraph. Actually, it is possible, but I'm just not the man to do it. So I'll just throw out some scattered thoug
...more
Conrad
The conventional wisdom is that Hemingway wrote short, choppy sentences and was fundamentally a bloodthirsty person, possibly as a consequence of insecurity about his masculinity. I don't think either is quite true.

As for the first point, I just don't find it to be anything but a stereotype perpetuated by people who haven't read him very carefully. Hemingway wrote a lot of sentences the length of which would have made Faulkner envious (though Faulkner was fond of the short, choppy sentences peop
...more
Sandra
Se dovessi fare, per gioco, una graduatoria dei racconti che più mi sono piaciuti, al primo posto metterei senza dubbio i racconti di Cechov, certo non tutti sono perfetti ma in generale i racconti del medico russo sono splendidi. Accanto ad essi metterei i racconti di Salinger, da I nove racconti ad Alzate l’architrave carpentieri e Seymour introduzione fino a Franny e Zooey, che di fatto sono due racconti: di Salinger i miei racconti preferiti sono Un giorno ideale per i pesci banana e Per Esm ...more
Maria  (Scratchbook)
Soltanto lo scrittore "che ha cambiato il modo di scrivere di tutto il mondo".

Leggere i Quarantanove di Hemingway è stato come riascoltare tutti gli scrittori che avevo conosciuto esprimersi attraverso una sola voce. In Colline come elefanti bianchi, uno dei miei racconti preferiti, si ha l'impressione di leggere un primo Raymond Carver. C'è tutta la delizia del testo sotto al testo, quei rivoli quotidiani che si incagliano nelle apparenze di dialoghi innocui e ordinari.

http://www.scratchbook
...more
Dave Russell
What I've read so far (possible spoilers):

THE SHORT, HAPPY LIFE OF FRANCIS MACOMBER
A man has the good sense to run away from a charging lion, and because of that, his wife sleeps with another man who bears a physical resemblance to Hemingway.
CAPITAL OF THE WORLD
A waiter and dishwasher are fooling around, pretending to be a bull and matador, and the waiter ends up with a knife in his femoral artery. I wonder if Hemingway were alive he would be writing stirring stories about the courage of those g
...more
Jacob
I have only read Hemingway's short stories but I feel like I am content with that for now. Their length seems completely adequate for his writing style. I was introduced to him in my junior year of high school when the teacher asked us to read and discuss Hills Like White Elephants. It seemed to stretch on forever with cryptic, emotional dialogue between the two sole characters who are waiting at a train station, peppered with bits of internal narrative describing the opposing landscapes on eith ...more
Nood-Lesse
Che cosa significa saper scrivere?

Se qualcuno mi chiedesse che cosa significa saper scrivere, gli consiglierei di leggere i 49 racconti.
Ernesto aveva l’Afición per la realtà oltre a uno smisurato talento per descriverla. La sua prima lettura, tanti anni fa, la devo a un verso di Guccini “I nostri miti morti ormai, la scoperta di Hemingway, il sentirsi nuovi, le cose sognate e ora viste” La scoperta di Hemingway… Se non è troppo e non è troppo poco, se è un solo aggettivo ma è quello giusto, se
...more
Claudia
“Con quel che ci è accaduto, quel che succede, quel che conosciamo e quello che non possiamo conoscere, inventiamo un qualcosa che non è una semplice rappresentazione ma una creazione totalmente nuova e più reale di qualsiasi cosa reale ed esistente e se la rendiamo viva e il risultato è buono, diventa immortale.”

Leggere ed essere trasportato in un altro luogo, un luogo che non ho ancora visitato e forse non visiterò mai. Nei racconti di Hemingway, pubblicati nel 1938, vi si trova tutta la passi
...more
Simona
In questo libro, come nei precedenti che ho letto, c'è lo zampino di quella grande donna che risponde al nome di Fernanda Pivano. Ogni libro che consiglia è una chicca di sublime bellezza e questo ne è la dimostrazione.
Ho viaggiato con Hemingway in Spagna in mezzo ai tori e alle corride, nella Parigi che in alcune scene, mi ricordava "Midnight in Paris", nella Milano delle corse al trotto, a Roma, nell'Africa dei cacciatori, insomma, in tutti i luoghi cari a Hemingway.
"I 49 racconti" che Hemin
...more
Misha
May 31, 2009 Misha marked it as sometimes-reading  ·  review of another edition
"A Clean, Well-Lighted Place" -- It's been at least 13 years since I'd read this story in a college American Lit survey, so it was pleasant to read it now and rediscover the beautiful simplicity of this brief tale about the inevitable loneliness of aging.

I was struck by the dichotomy between the waiter-with-a-wife and the older waiter/the old man. The waiter-with-a-wife has the narrow view of someone who is relatively fulfilled. He can't understand why the old man would despair if he has plenty
...more
Christy
Hemingway's true element was the short story and the selection in this collection shows the development of his status as a master in that particular art form. Despite being technically astute, Hemmingway's writing style and stories are definitely an acquired taste.

I personally find it interesting that many people criticize Hemmingway for being unabashedly male and particularly of the classic 'macho' variety. This can be a turn-off for many readers, but I read it as refreshingly honest and true t
...more
Jen
I've only read selected stories, but I loved them all. This is a good book to read if you're trying to get into Hemingway. Many people are force fed The Old Man and the Sea in their youth. I know it was a bad experience, but put it behind you and move on to better things. Hemingway really gets broken down into small and manageable pieces in this collection. I really enjoyed A Clean, Well-Lighted Place, Soldier's Home, and A Way You'll Never Be. Also, a great conversation can be had about how pla ...more
Claudia
Ci ho messo un sacco per finire questo libro. Non che non mi sia piaciuto, gli ho dato cinque stelle, scritto magistralmente, da Hemingway non ci si potrebbe aspettare di meno.
Erano le trame, ad essere angoscianti. Alla fine di ogni racconto qualcuno muore, qualcuno fa una brutta fine, qualcuna viene violentata, qualcuno vede i propri sogni scomparire eterei, qualcuno non ha neanche la forza per averne, di sogni.
Le scene di caccia poi, sono veramente insostenibili, per un'amante degli animali co
...more
Realini
The Capital of the World by Ernest Hemingway

Madrid is the capital in the title of the story which starts with a joke:
Paco is the diminutive for Francisco and there were perhaps there still are many boys named Paco, so when an ad was placed by a father – “Paco meet me at hotel Manana on Tuesday, all is forgiven” – the Guardia Civil had to be summoned to deal with the 800 men who answered the announcement.

From the beginning on towards the end, the light note gives room to a darker, sadder note. An
...more
Patrick Michael
The Battler

'It was a beechwood forest and the fallen beechnut burrs were under his shoes as he walked between the trees. The fire was bright now, just at the edge of the trees. There was a man sitting by it. Nick waited behind the tree and watched. The man looked to be alone. He was sitting there with his head in his hands looking at the fire.'


'"My heart's slow. It only beats forty a minute. Feel it."'


A Clean, Well-Lighted Place

'They sat together at a table that was close against the wall near t
...more
daniel silliman
There are a few stories here, "A Clean, Well-Lighted Place" and "The Capital of the World," that, all by themselves, would earn Hemingway a place in the canon. There are others, though, which are stupid, macho, self-destructive and infuriatingly awful. For the awful misuse of the amazing title "Hills Like White Elephants" alone, Hemingway should have been punched in the face. Judging from some of these stories, he would have liked it.
Sarah
May 12, 2007 Sarah rated it 4 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Someone in a time crunch who loves the classics
It pains me to say this as an English-degree holder, but I've never made it all the way through a Hemingway novel. (The Old Man and the Sea doesn't count.) In a long context, the staccato, sparse style leaves me cold. However, Hemingway's short stories just kill me. In these stories, the simplicity of his text makes the subtext all the more clear.
Susie
I really wish you could have a section on Goodreads for books you will read a bit at a time. I read the first 80 pages of The Short Stories of Ernest Hemingway and they were wonderful. Unfortunately, I want to parse them out and read more at another time. I'll say this book is "to be continued..."
M. D.
This is my third go at reading Hemingway and I'd hoped it would be the one to turn it around for me. But it hasn't. A couple of the first stories collected here are pretty good but most of them in this collection I just could not get into. I just can't see the appeal of the man's writing, not to the extent that everyone always seems to go on about. Maybe this makes me un-American and maybe it doesn't. I admire anyone who takes up the occupation/calling of putting words on the page; writing is on ...more
JayDiddums10
Powerful. Straightforward. Real. Brilliant.
Procyon Lotor
Cos ricolmi d'idee da essere cinquanta. Poche cose invecchiano come i gadget, gli aggeggi, le cornicine, le passamanerie civiche e non. I colori. In genere gli attributi. Ma gli attributi danno sostanza. Per secoli il procedimento di ripulitura, di sfrondatura, di eliminazione ha illuso moltitudini che fosse la strada per giungere all'Essere. Essere che una volta ridotto all'essenza, diventava oggetto dannatamente ostico per discorrervi sopra, cos ostico da non poterci dire praticamente nulla, d ...more
Renee
On the rating I waffled between a 3 and 4. It was different reading Hemmingway as a 45-year-old than it was as a teenager. When I first ready this collection of stories I was considering a career as a writier, possibly as a journalist, and I was exploring as much of the literary canon as possible. In some ways, I was much more open to different things than I am now, especially works of critical acclaim. Nowadays I read mostly for pleasure in my leisure hours and have fallen into a bit of a rut a ...more
Gavin
I had been wanting to read Hemingway for a while since I was mentally checked-out when I read A Farewell To Arms as a junior in high school. His writing style of course garners tons of praise and I can see why. It is neither pretentious nor contrived, nor too choppy or elongated. The narration is such that I almost feel as though I'm watching the dialogue happen right in front of me, or reading a character's thoughts in real time. Some stories seemed like they wanted to be profound but I perhaps ...more
Shawn
I picked this collection of Ernest Hemingway's The Short Stories up again because I cannot write dialogue. A young Hunter S. Thompson would type Hemingway's stories out on a typewriter to get the feel of his cadence, his rhythm, and his way of articulation. There is something unique about Hemingway's writing, and I think that his short stories are one of the best showcases of his particular talent for dialogue and the dramatic, yet stripped-down, crescendo.

As I mentioned, I cannot write dialogue
...more
K.
Breve la vita felice di Francis Macomber?!

Una coppia americana va in vacanza a uccidere bestie.
Lui deve dimostrare a lei che non ha paura, però lui ha paura.
Il giorno prima è successo qualcosa cui si accenna ma poi si capisce che è la stessa cosa che succede il giorno dopo solo che stavolta lo racconta: devono sparare ad un leone.
Il cacciatore che li accompagna riflette su quanto sia ingrato il suo compito di scoparsi tutte le mogli degli americani a cui insegna ad ammazzare gli animali.
La s
...more
Cory Donnelly
I love Ernest Hemingway. Along with Cormac McCarthy he is probably my favorite author. I needed something I could read off and on for a few weeks as I was going to be busy in spurts and this was a great choice. Some stories are better than others, but they all bear the unmistakable Hemingway style. The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber, The Snows of Kilimanjaro, Up in Michigan, Indian Camp, The Three Day Blow, Cat in the Rain, Cross-Country Snow, Big Two-Hearted River Parts 1 & 2, In Anot ...more
R.a.
When Hemingway's "on," he's on.

Other than that, Faulkner's critique seems apt.

And here's a bit of the proof in this collection. The great stories: "Macomber," "The Capital of the World," "Snows of Kilimanjaro," "In Another Country," "Hills Like White Elephants," and "A Clean Well-Lighted Place."

Less so: "Up in Michigan," "Indian Camp," "The Doctor and the Doctor's Wife," "The Battler," "Cat in the Rain," "Cross-Country Snow," "The Undefeated," "Fifty Grand," and some others.

His style has unquest
...more
Eddie Tafoya
Teachers and American lit professors can go on all they want about "For Whom the Bell Tolls," "The Old Man and the Sea," and "The Sun Also Rises." This volume, also referred to as "the first forty-nine" and includes the stories originally contained in "in our time," "In Our Time," "Men Without Women," "Winner Take Nothing," and "The Snows of Kilimanjaro and Other Stories" is Hemwingway's masterpiece.
Holly
Apr 12, 2015 Holly rated it 4 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Everyone
Recommended to Holly by: Lots of people, I suppose.
Hemingway is often unfairly characterized as a man's man. Yes, his stories tend to use hunting, war and sports as their vehicle, but there is so much emotional depth and breadth to each story that to be impressed by his innovative sentence structure above all else sells Hemingway wildly short.

There is a rawness to almost every story in this compilation that speaks to the dark (and sometimes not so dark) parts in the human heart. The range of stories is so great that it's difficult to choose one
...more
Deanna
This is the first Hemingway I've ever read. It was very interesting more for his unique style than for the content of the stories. In fact, I didn't really enjoy the stories themselves, but reading his style was fascinating. But it took me two years to finish it so I wouldn't call it an enjoyable read. I'll probably wait a few years before I pick up the old man and the sea.
« previous 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 99 100 next »
There are no discussion topics on this book yet. Be the first to start one »
  • The Short Stories
  • The Early Stories
  • Rock Springs
  • The Complete Short Stories of Mark Twain
  • Stories
  • Collected Stories
  • Collected Stories
  • Tutte le poesie
  • Racconti
  • The Watch
  • The Stories of Bernard Malamud
  • The Stories of John Cheever
  • The Pastures of Heaven
  • The Collected Writings Of Ambrose Bierce
  • Racconti
  • Hemingway: a Life Story
  • Will You Please Be Quiet, Please?
  • Harmony of the World: Stories
1455
Ernest Miller Hemingway was an American author and journalist. His economical and understated style had a strong influence on 20th-century fiction, while his life of adventure and his public image influenced later generations. Hemingway produced most of his work between the mid-1920s and the mid-1950s, and won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1954. He published seven novels, six short story collec ...more
More about Ernest Hemingway...
The Old Man and the Sea The Sun Also Rises For Whom the Bell Tolls A Farewell to Arms A Moveable Feast

Share This Book

“Some other places were not so good but maybe we were not so good when we were in them.” 12 likes
“Even if he was ever afraid he knew that he could do it anyway.” 9 likes
More quotes…