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A Girl of the Limberlost
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A Girl of the Limberlost (Limberlost #2)

4.13 of 5 stars 4.13  ·  rating details  ·  11,682 ratings  ·  1,038 reviews
Wounded by her embittered mother's lack of sympathy, Elnora finds comfort in the nearby Limberlost Swamp. A wonderful story and a book to treasure.
Paperback, 384 pages
Published 1988 by Signet Classics (first published 1909)
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Sparrow
Jul 10, 2009 Sparrow rated it 2 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Sarah Palin
Shelves: reviewed
Childrens' books like A Girl of the Limberlost remind me of the instruction manuals that come with furniture that you have to assemble yourself. They are assembly instructions for morality. Life is so easy, and there are little stick people on the pages to show you how it is all done successfully. I adored Little Women when I was a kid, for example, but in recent years I've tried to re-read it a couple of times, and I can't get past the part where Marmie makes the girls give up their Christmas b ...more
Tadiana
I have some GR friends who are into old-timey books. I had great luck with their recommend of Daddy-Long-Legs, so when A Girl of the Limberlost, written in 1909, was also highly recommended, I was all up for another delightful, old-fashioned experience. Anne Shirley, make way for Elnora Comstock . . . okay, Elnora was losing ground already with that name, but outdated names kind of come with the territory here, so I was still optimistic.

At the beginning of the book, Elnora is a 16 year old girl
...more
Nicola O.
Jul 22, 2007 Nicola O. rated it 4 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: fans of old-fashioned young adult books
Shelves: youngadult
Read lots and lots of GSP when I was a kid-- Girl of the Limberlost remains my favorite. It's an engrossing coming-of-age story with elements of redemption and romance, set in rural Indiana, early 20th century (I would guess by the publication date). I think most adolescent girls can relate to Elnora's struggles with her mother, and the resolution of that is very satisfying. Elnora herself triumphs over adversity through courage, integrity, and hard work, but is not obnoxiously saintly. The auth ...more
Kathryn Bundy
Since I was able to download this childhood classic for free, I reread it for the first time since I was a girl. I have long held that it was one of my favorites from about the age of ten. It seemed mysterious and magical to me then. As I read it with the eyes of an adult five decades later, it reminded me of how many books from my grandparents' shelves were the morality tales that shaped my reading life and my worldview. It is a book of its time, in some ways more advanced than one would expect ...more
Gloria
Aug 10, 2008 Gloria rated it 5 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Teenage females, Adult females who like clean fiction
Recommended to Gloria by: Mom
Shelves: young-adult
This nostalgic story was written in 1906, but has rather surprising relevance to today's culture. Well crafted and unique, the issues covered include: bullying, parental neglect, extramarital affair, unhealthy grief, peer pressure, alcoholism, window peeping, depression, and class culture clashes. Elnora is a teenage girl with many factors making life difficult. In true American spirit, she rises above the odds and educates herself and teaches others how to treat her. She achieves not only an ed ...more
Heidi
A Girl of the Limberlost is one of those true treasures of the book world, one I personally never would have uncovered if it weren’t for my notion to do Booking It Across the US. I was at a loss for an Indiana book, there weren’t an abundance of titles that I recognized, but when I called on Twitter, Allison of The Allure of Books answered with Gene Stratton-Porter. I adore hidden classics (though I admit there are quite a few not-so-hidden ones I really need to get to), and so I commenced to re ...more
Lily
May 15, 2007 Lily rated it 5 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Those who have worked hard for what they believe in
Shelves: favorite
This is one of the books that I have read probably 100 times. It is the story of Elnora Comstock, a poor farm girl that loved the outdoors, mainly the Liberlost swamp beside her home. All Elnora wants is to go to high school, but her mother disagrees and makes life incredibly difficult for Elnora. Through the story you see Elnora go from a socially sheltered girl to a confident and beautiful lady. Everytime I read this book, I want to visit Indiana to see if anything is left of the Limberlost sw ...more
Nina
There is a line in this book that I carry on a card in my purse. "If you are Lazy and accept your lot, you may live in it. If you are willing to work you can write your name anywhere" Gene Stratton-Porter is a giften writer that writes of her beloved Limberlost swamp and the people that around it. As with her other books, there are characters that have extreme hardship and rise above them to become better individuals. Elnora Comstock is an impoverished young girl that feels unloved, and earns mu ...more
Mandy Leins
Well worth reading for an honest look at what life was like for a naturalist in the late 19th and early 20th century. While it is fiction, I would highly recommend reading this for what it tells you about all the things that are peripheral to the story. Also, do a little background reading on Gene Stratten-Porter. She's an amazing individual, and what she accomplished in her life is beyond belief (when you consider that, by law, her husband had to sign any legal documents in her name for them to ...more
Jeana
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Kirk
First and foremost, you ask, what is a Limberlost? My wife will tell you it's a fairly accurate description of my posture at my decrepit age, but however true that may be, it's irrelevant to Gene Stratton-Porter's most famous novel. The Limberlost is actually a famous forest area in eastern Indiana where the author and her husband made their initial wealth. Today a portion of it operates as a state historical site, with tourists able to tour the cabin, which looks like this:

description

Of course, by the tim
...more
Charlotte
What a joy it is to read Gene Stratton-Porter! I picked this book up at my daughter's orchestra concert - which I arrived at 45 min. early - and finding myself bookless, I asked her if she had anything in her locker I could read. She produced this book, which I hadn't read in quite a while; I got totally lost in it well before the concert started, and I couldn't put it down! I love the moral fiber of the characters, and how adversity shaped Elnora into the beautiful woman she became. Now I'm rea ...more
Elaine
Dec 17, 2007 Elaine rated it 4 of 5 stars
Recommends it for: High school or older
My mother always wanted me to read this book, it was a favorite of hers. She probably read it in the 30s. Well, I've finally done it! Written in 1909, it is definitely an example of the writing style of that time. There are many things to interest modern readers, though, from young teen through mature adult.

The protagonist, Elnora, is a student of nature, and she specializes in moths. The descriptions of the moths, the birds, the flowers of the beautiful Indiana woodlands are glowing. We learn
...more
April
Nov 02, 2008 April rated it 4 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: girls between 11-100, great living book
This was a sweet book. I disagree with the other comments and do not think it was anything like Anne of Green Gables. It was a really good story about love, loss, letting go, and learning to love agian. I loved the amount of resilence the main character had-she over came so much in this coming of age tale. I enjoyed the nature talk throughout the book. I hope there are still parts of the Limberlost preserved today. You could do a really nice literature unit on this book and incorporate all the s ...more
Piebakersue
This was a popular book back in the very early 20th century, when it was written. It's dated but nevertheless quite interesting. The limberlost is a sort of swamp of 13,000 acres in Indiana (thank you wikipedia) and the girl, whose name I have forgotten. No, I remember, it was Elnora, lives on the edge with her crazy mother, where Elnora collects moths and excells in school. The mother is still pining the loss of her husband in the limberlost, and she resents Elnora, but truth be learned, her hu ...more
Judith
While I love A Girl of the Limberlost, and consider one of GSP's best books. Some reviews say it's her best,but I disagree. Her best is Freckles. There are similarities in both books and you will enjoy both, but I suggest that you read Freckles first.

I first read this book as a pre teen and fell in love with it, and after re reading it many times I've never changed my mind.

Gene Stratton Porter wrote this book when she was at the peak of her writing skills and it shows. It's a story about a you
...more
Kristin
This is now one of my top favorite books of all time. It sucked me deep into another time and place, which was lovely, comforting, beautiful, and fantastic. It's ahead of its time in its treatment of women, in that the protagonist is an intelligent, independent woman who both warrants respect and gives it to all people and all living things--a scientist, a scholar, a musician, and a teacher all in one. The characters are richly painted, and the story is full of suspense and surprise, as well as ...more
Annette
Free eBook from Project Gutenberg.
I found this book in the comments section of a list of top 100 books for youth, and quickly added it to my Nook queue. I'm quite glad to have found it, and certainly plan to add it to my list of kids books. Appropriate for early to late teens, I'd place it in roughly the same genera as "Little Women," with strong overtones of "Little House on the Prairie." Set (and written) in first decade of the 20th century, the story follows Elnora Comstock, who lives on a h
...more
Heidi
A Girl of the Limberlost is one of those true treasures of the book world, one I personally never would have uncovered if it weren’t for my notion to do Booking It Across the US. I was at a loss for an Indiana book, there weren’t an abundance of titles that I recognized, but when I called on Twitter, Allison of The Allure of Books answered with Gene Stratton-Porter. I adore hidden classics (though I admit there are quite a few not-so-hidden ones I really need to get to), and so I commenced to re ...more
Mariel
Sep 05, 2010 Mariel rated it 2 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: sting like a moth
Recommended to Mariel by: pnin me like a moth
I got this as a random find on ten cent day for my local library's book sale in 2009. It was okay at first, if outdated in all sensibilities. The naturist parts were interesting. It was funny how the girl treasured the wild that was increasingly (back then even?) encroached on by society, yet she collected those rare moths to be stuck with pins (!) for profit so that she could join the society she was kept away from by her uncaring mother. Guess she wasn't too sad about it, after all. Her mother ...more
Bridgette Redman
Girl of the Limberlost is not a book to be read when one is feeling cynical, critical, or simply jaded. For starters, it is a children’s book and children aren’t supposed to be jaded or cynical yet. Secondly, it’s a book that emphasizes sweetness and light—not dreary realism or angry conflicts.

Girl of the Limberlost portrays a time long since lost. It relates the story of Elnora Comstock and her life in the swamp of the Limberlost. She is a plucky girl, but not of the type of pluck that we assoc
...more
Amy Anderson
Joseph's grandma gave this book to Diana because it was one of her favorites. I had to read it to be closer to her! The book reminded me of Anne of Green Gables type story. In this book a girl whose mother resents her, learns to thrive in the world. And at a crossroads her mother learns what she mourns is something that betrayed her and she reconciles with her daughter. The girl also finds love and I love how she stands up for what is right. She doesn't fall all over herself over a young man wit ...more
Emily
Thank you, Carrie for recommending this book to me last winter. I haven't stopped thinking about it since. I hope my girls will have half of the curiosity for natural science as the heroine of this book.

I must admit that I felt pangs of loss and mourning at the descriptions of the Limberlost forest and its wonders--knowing that so much of the nature around us has turned to parking lots. Good thing I'll be able to read this story with my girls someday in case they never experience such a world f
...more
Sara
What a delightful book! Beautiful on its own it is a a superior sequel to Freckles. It reminded me of Anne of Green Gables and An Old Fashioned Girl with scenes of Pride and Prejudice (think of Darcy's aunt visiting Lizzie). Unlike Laddie, this was gripping from the very start and like Laddie was rich with beautiful descriptions. An extremely well done story that will be revisited by me many times in the future.
Polly
This is a lovely book. It's charming and warm. I highly recommend it.
Coco
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
bkjunkie
Aug 16, 2010 bkjunkie rated it 4 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Anyone who likes a good story, likes the classics, likes to learn about nature.
Recommended to bkjunkie by: Kindle
Shelves: kindle-shelf
This was a refreshingly great book. The hard road this young girl travels through her childhood and young adulthood has a formed a nobel, humble, loving person who lives to serve others. She is posed with a choice which affects herself and others, and after much thought, and surprisingly feeling attitudes for the others concerned, makes a decision most people would not accept let alone even conceive in our day. She serves and loves others when even her own mother is unable to and rather than bec ...more
Flourish
I'm not at all sure how to give this a starred rating, so instead I'll tick off some of the pluses and minuses I can think of about the book:

+ When I was ten, I would have loved this book. It's the kind of Cinderella story that is also about a girl winning her way through by grit and can-do spirit—the kind of thing I adored then.
- There's a lot of weirdness about attitudes towards nature. We love nature, but we ought to dig oil wells? And we see how there are fewer and fewer moths around when we
...more
Laura
I first read Girl of the Limberlost when I was about 15 or so. I was spending my summer in Texline, TX, a town of 300 people. The library consisted of 3 shelves in the town hall. Girl of the Limberlost was one of the books on those shelves.

For all these years, I've thought the book was set in Florida. I think it's because of the continuing mention of swamps. Imagine my surprise that, while re-reading, I discovered it was set in Indiana!

After reading , I was disappointed by Girl of Limberlost. Th
...more
Rachelle
I am now officially a fan of Gene Stratton-Porter. Written by the same author as Laddie: A True Blue Story, this book is similar in many ways. Stratton-Porter is obviously a lover of nature and one who likes strong characters with happy endings. Elnora is a country girl who enters into a city school and faces many trials as she seeks to fulfill her dream of going to school. Elnora is a seemingly flawless character who is good and decent and kind no matter what she faces. It is a very feel good s ...more
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1372693
She was an American author, amateur naturalist, wildlife photographer, and one of the earliest women to form a movie studio and production company. She wrote some of the best selling novels and well-received columns in magazines of the day.

Born Geneva Grace Stratton in Wabash County, Indiana, she married Charles D. Porter in 1886, and they had one daughter, Jeannette.

She became a wildlife photogra
...more
More about Gene Stratton-Porter...

Other Books in the Series

Limberlost (2 books)
  • Freckles (Limberlost #1)
Freckles (Limberlost #1) Laddie: A True Blue Story The Keeper of the Bees The Harvester Michael O'Halloran

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“If you are lazy, and accept your lot, you may live in it. If you are willing to work, you can write your name anywhere you choose.” 1228 likes
“I know men and women. An honourable man is an honourable man, and a liar is a liar; both are born and not made. One cannot change to the other any more than that same old leopard can change its spots.
After a man tells a woman the first untruth of that sort, the others come piling thick, fast, and mountain high.”
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