Galen's Prophecy: Temperament In Human Nature
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Galen's Prophecy: Temperament In Human Nature

4.11 of 5 stars 4.11  ·  rating details  ·  18 ratings  ·  4 reviews
Nearly two thousand years ago a physician named Galen of Pergamon suggested that much of the variation in human behavior could be explained by an individual’s temperament. Since that time, inborn dispositions have fallen in and out of favor. Based on fifteen years of research, Galen’s Prophecy now provides fresh insights into these complex questions, offering startling new...more
Paperback, 376 pages
Published 1998 by Westview Press (first published 1994)
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Fred R
A challenging book. The numerous digressions on the scientific method were as informative as the actual subject, including an incisive history of the social sciences in America. His comparisons of qualitative vs. quantitative categorizing, and peak or outlier tendencies vs. averages were also quite good.
The most interesting to me were his various speculations on group differences in temperament, including a digression on the causal connection between temperament and religion (speculations that...more
Jes
One of the few books used in class that I hung onto. I have returned to it again and again, used it many times in many feilds of study not just psych.
Full of so much information, especially given the growing feild of epigenetics (although he does not talk about that per-say it ties directly into what he is talking about, and I have heard lectures from visiting researchers in the feild of epigenetics talk highly of this work).
Bit of a tough read but so worth it!
Subjects covered: biological basis...more
Dawn
Kagan is thoughtful and articulate. Took a class from him on the development of brain and behavior that was jointly taught with a professor from the Psychology department, and a medical doctor. A pivotal course in college. Provided profound insights that continue to impact my life and career decisions.
Erika
Jun 30, 2010 Erika marked it as to-read
Harvard researcher writing on temperament (from Balkan Ghosts)
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