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Cry Havoc: How the Arms Race Drove the World to War, 1931-1941
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Cry Havoc: How the Arms Race Drove the World to War, 1931-1941

4.02  ·  Rating Details ·  44 Ratings  ·  6 Reviews
Did the arms race of the 1930s cause the Second World War?In Cry Havoc, historian Joseph Maiolo shows, in rich and fascinating detail, how the deadly game of the arms race was played out in the decade prior to the outbreak of the Second World War. In this exhaustively researched account, he explores how nations reacted to the moves of their rivals, revealing the thinking o ...more
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Published September 28th 2010 by Basic Books (first published March 4th 2010)
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William
Apr 29, 2013 William rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
The approach march frames everything that follows in battle. The same applies to wars.

"Cry Havoc" by Joseph Maiolo is the story of how the decade-long arms race preceding WWII helped shape the opening and the scope of the war. For many readers, the 1930s will get a polite chapter in any WWII history, explaining the forces leading up to the first shots. After that, your typical war history is battles, battles, and more battles.

Maiolo does not replace that, so much as complements it. Sticking to
...more
Barron
Sep 25, 2010 Barron rated it liked it
On November 5, 1937, Adolf Hitler assembled his foreign policy staff to deliver a flamboyant rant about Germany’s strategic predicament. The Third Reich, he said, was currently ahead in the arms race against France, Great Britain, and the Soviet Union—but if it didn’t begin invading other countries soon, the country’s massive defense expenditures would trigger an economic meltdown. “If we do not act by 1943-1945,” he told them, “any year could, in consequence of a lack of reserves, produce the f ...more
John
Jan 25, 2012 John rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
A bit technocratic but informative and interesting look at the interwar period from a "war ministry" kind of perspective. Coming out of the industrialized slaughterhouse of WWI, many countries/leaders drew the conclusion that it wasn't going to be country with the best weapons per se that won the next war, but probably the country with the best economy. More precisely, whomever could achieve economic autarky and best mobilize the full resources of their nation, would likely triumph over less sel ...more
King Wenclas
Dec 10, 2011 King Wenclas rated it really liked it
This is a well-written, absorbing book. More important, its theme is very relevant for us today. Maiolo thoroughly builds his case that the most important need for a nation's military defense is a strong economy underpinning it. The conclusion I draw is that the U.S. had better first get its economy moving and its financial house in order. Without that, there won't be any money to spend on armaments! In other words, cutting military expenditures NOW, while we still have a significant lead in mil ...more
Nathan
May 11, 2013 Nathan rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
A solid account of the basic lines of economic/industrial strategy leading up to the outbreak of the second world war and the first couple of years of fighting.

No huge surprises or insights in here, but it would serve as a decent primer to the topic.

Was interesting to note, though, the author's belief that France was actually in better socio-political shape in 39-40 than many other established texts suggest (pace Howard). So there are a couple of nuggets to be mined here.

Rated G 3/5
Ron
Book on an interesting topic that ultimately was a rehash of previously encounterd scholarship written in a hum-drum academic fashion without flash of inspiration..
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