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Keeping Together in Time

3.49  ·  Rating Details ·  35 Ratings  ·  4 Reviews
Could something as simple and seemingly natural as falling into step have marked us for evolutionary success? In "Keeping Together in Time" one of the most widely read and respected historians in America pursues the possibility that coordinated rhythmic movement--and the shared feelings it evokes--has been a powerful force in holding human groups together.As he has done ...more
Paperback, 216 pages
Published October 30th 1997 by Harvard University Press (first published 1995)
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Seeing Like a State by James C. ScottThe Mind in the Cave by James David Lewis-WilliamsCrowds and Power by Elias CanettiCivilization and capitalism 15th-18th century, Vol 2 by Fernand BraudelKeeping Together in Time by William Hardy McNeill
Brian Eno's Reading List
5th out of 20 books — 2 voters
Seeing Like a State by James C. ScottThe Mind in the Cave by James David Lewis-WilliamsCrowds and Power by Elias CanettiCivilization and capitalism 15th-18th century, Vol 2 by Fernand BraudelKeeping Together in Time by William Hardy McNeill
Brian Eno’s Reading List
5th out of 75 books — 1 voter


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Jaimella Shaikh
Jan 31, 2016 Jaimella Shaikh rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
I was glad to track down a copy of this fascinating academic book through the American Council of Learning Societies print on demand service. This sliver of a book somehow manages to capture the importance of dance and drill through human history. McNeill draws on chimpanzee behaviour, dance in religious ceremonies, Greek phalanxes, Nazi Germany and Japanese callisthenics to support his thesis: 'Moving our muscles rhythmically and giving voice consolidate group solidarity by altering human ...more
Laura Hellsten
Feb 26, 2016 Laura Hellsten rated it did not like it
Shelves: phd
The idea is great and the thesis is interesting but such a sad fact that at least in the religious aspect he is mostly quoting quasi science or then adding up quotes and ideas from different times and places that just can't be generalized in this manner if one wants to be a "real" academic/reseacher. Further more, the fact that he starts of from evolutionary theory and never seems to move much further then that just makes the thesis even more lacking in credibility. It stays mostly speculative ...more
Geoff
Dec 10, 2013 Geoff rated it it was amazing
A fun, thought-provoking book that sees profound significance in Maurice of Orange's early modern military drill manual, dances, and various other practices and artifacts involving synchronized or simultaneous movement by groups of people. As in virtually all books of such a broad scope and sweeping statements, it not difficult to find points with which to quarrel. But it nonetheless gives the reader plenty to think about.
Scott
Mar 08, 2014 Scott marked it as to-read
I added this to my To Read list since both Brian Eno and Stewart Brand include McNeill in their Long Now lists. It's about the role of rhythmic coordinated movement (dance, drills) in human communities.
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3246912
aka William William Hardy McNeill is a Canadian-American world historian and author, particularly noted for his writings on Western civilization. He is Professor Emeritus of History at the University of Chicago where he has taught since 1947.
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