Fertile Ground: Women, Earth, and the Limits of Control
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Fertile Ground: Women, Earth, and the Limits of Control

3.75 of 5 stars 3.75  ·  rating details  ·  8 ratings  ·  3 reviews
Irene Diamond has written a passionate and provocative book that challenges the feminist movement to step beyond its preconceptions. . . . We desperately need this synthesis. -from the Foreword by Starhaw

In a wide-ranging critique of Western thought and practice, ecofeminist Irene Diamond raises unsettling questions about the ethic of control that permeates how we think a...more
Paperback, 224 pages
Published November 25th 1997 by Beacon Press (first published 1994)
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Elizabeth
This book looks at the comparison between the way the West treats fertility in terms of its female population and its agricultural produce. Diamond suggests that the West is obsessed with "control" and regulation when it comes to fertility: control over manor and quantity of the soil's produce and control over the production of human babies. She looks at the way in which the birth control pill has gone from a tool of women's liberation to a tool of regulation and control by doctors and compares...more
Mike
a wonderful "ecofeminist" piece. My central take-away from this book is that the desire to control transcends the object of control. What I mean by this is that the urge that leads a chauvinist husband to keep his wife in her place is fundamentally similar to the one that allows us to destroy a rain forest or push indigenous people off of their land. All oppression comes from a common source and only when that root is exposed can people (and all other things) truly be free.
Elizabeth
This book looks at the comparison between the way the West treats fertility in terms of its female population and its agricultural produce. Diamond suggests that the West is obsessed with "control" and regulation when it comes to fertility: control over manor and quantity of the soil's produce and control over the production of human babies. She looks at the way in which the birth control pill has gone from a tool of women's liberation to a tool of regulation and control by doctors and compares...more
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