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Kokopelli's Flute

3.64  ·  Rating Details  ·  360 Ratings  ·  40 Reviews
THE MAGIC HAD ALWAYS BEEN THERE.
Tep Jones has always felt the magic of Picture House, an Anasazi cliff dwelling near the seed farm where he lives with his parents. But he could never have imagined what would happen to him on the night of a lunar eclipse, when he finds a bone flute left behind by grave robbers. Tep falls under the spell of a powerful ancient magic that tr
...more
ebook, 160 pages
Published September 8th 2008 by Atheneum Books for Young Readers (first published 1995)
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Zach
Nov 25, 2015 Zach marked it as to-read  ·  review of another edition
In this book, Tepary Jones turns into a magical packrat, all from using Kokopeli's magical flute. This story takes place in modern day New Mexico. It all happens when Tepary wants to watch the eclipse in in the picture house, an old ruin made by the original americans. Tomb raiders were digging throughout the graves while Tepary and his dog hide in the back un noticed. When they leave Tepary finds a magic flute originally from a shaman, that the tomb raiders left behind. But little did he know, ...more
Melissa
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Cathy Cole
Jul 23, 2015 Cathy Cole rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Many many moons ago, I used to be in charge of the children's section of our village library. I occasionally like to pick up a middle grade or young adult mystery to take a look at what's available for younger readers now, and I have to admit that I'm glad I chose Kokopelli's Flute. Will Hobbs has written an adventure that kept me hooked from first page to last.

First of all, there's the idyllic (to me) setting: the Seed Farm in the New Mexico section of the Four Corners, within walking distance
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Pamela
Tepary (Tep) Jones is not your average 13-year old. For one, he's named after a bean (and refers to himself as 'The Human Bean'). His parents own a Seed Farm, where college students work for credit, and they send seeds for planting all over the world. Tep's best friend is a dog named Dusty. Oh... and he turns into a pack rat every night.

When Tep finds a flute made out of eagle bone at the ancient Picture House, he tries to play a few notes. Big mistake. Playing the flute makes him a 'changeling
...more
Marika Gillis
Jul 07, 2008 Marika Gillis rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Erin B.
This is a Battle of the Books book (or at least it was last year) and I am anxious to read all the books on the Battle of the Books list. This one was terrific!

Kokopelli is the Indian name of the magical person who brought seeds from one Hopi village to another in ancient times. The legend of Kokopelli is held sacred by Tepary Jones and his parents as they raise crops on their dryland seed farm, caring for the plants and selling the seeds in their catalog. When Tepary hikes to Picture House, an
...more
Books Kids Like
Oct 02, 2013 Books Kids Like rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: hobbs-will
Mythical…Magical…Enchanting
Tepary Jones goes to Picture House, an Anazasi ruin, to watch the lunar eclipse. His vigil is interrupted by pothunters desecrating a medicine man’s grave. Tepary scares them away with burning tumbleweed and finds the eagle-bone flute they dropped during their escape. Tepary plays the flute while a bushy-tailed woodrat watches. Later, at home, Tepary changes into a woodrat. This transformation continues to occur every night so Tepary sleeps by Picture House to protect
...more
Madison Straatman
Tepary Jones, named after the bean, and his dog, Dusty, hike to the Picture House to watch the eclipse. And they get so, so much more than they had bargained for.

I really liked this book, because it was interesting to read. It integrated an old legend with modern day events, with an interesting twist of events. Mysterious characters, a deadly disease, and Tep's midnight changes made me want to keep reading.
Ruben Ramirez
In my opinion, this book was ok. The way the idea of magic being in a cliff might seem strange, but it helps the main character with his family's seed farm. Although he has a curse on him, he knows what is right and that he will do what ever he can to help him and his mother. The adventure with Tep brings suspense in all kinds of ways. To me this book was not my type, but was an alright book.
Lara
Jan 23, 2016 Lara rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
We read this as a family. The story line was interesting and engaging but there was a lot of botanical information that most people just aren't interested in. There's a reason I failed Botany in college. I'm just not interested in it and apparently the rest of the family found it boring as well. We love Native American history and cultural learning so this book would have been much better without all the boring plant information.
Heidi
Jun 22, 2009 Heidi rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: action-adventure
Tepary, Tep for short was named for a variety of dryland bean raised by his parents in Southwest Colorado. Tep is an only child and has a lot of time to go exploring on his own. Some of his favorite places are the Anasazi ruins near his home. One day, he finds that one of these sites has been plundered by grave robbers, leaving a hole in a burial. Tep spies a flute in the skeleton's hands. Without thinking, he grabs it and plays it. Later that night, Tep transforms into a bushy-tailed wood rat! ...more
Matt
Dec 12, 2010 Matt rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
It was just good not great. The main reason I did not readily enjoy this tale was that it did not fit the type of genre I like to read. If you are in for an adventure and a little bit of history this book may have u reading and rereading for hours. I definitely recommended this book to people who enjoy a good adventure. The story starts with a young boy who lives with his parents in New Mexico near the ancient picture house dwellings. With his explorations he begins to know the land. One day he ...more
Melissa French
--A perfect book for kids with an interest in archeology and fantasy
Judi Paradis
Feb 06, 2010 Judi Paradis rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Great adventure story for grades 4 and 5. Young Tep lives in the remote New Mexican desert with his scientist parents. While out on a hike with his dog, he encounters some "pot snatchers" who take artifacts from protected Indian sites. Tep stops them, but after they leave, he plays on a flute they've uncovered and finds that it has magic powers. Tep is now enchanted and must figure out how to release himself from this spell. Lots of information about Native American culture, environmentalism, an ...more
Mckinley
Interesting, fair amount about seeds and farming.
Yannik Marchand
Apr 09, 2014 Yannik Marchand rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
I like the story, there is a bit of fantasy and it is different from most other stories. I haven't read a book I can compare to this one. I don't know any other book where humans turn into animals. It's interesting to read about the people that lived there a long time ago. Some parts are a little bit strange though. There pops up a man at the seed farm who is thousands of years old. That doesn't happen often in real life. I do not recommend all people to read it, it depends on what kind of stori ...more
Patti
Jun 17, 2014 Patti rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: read-in-2014
Good, suspenseful and innovative.
Matt Shake
The plot here left a lot to be desired, especially in contrast to "Crossing the Wire" which I read previously. I think this book was written about 8 years before "Crossing..." and I can confidently say that Hobbs has grown a lot as a writer. Nevertheless, I did think that Hobbs' attempt at creating a modern-day Native American legend was a clever notion. But, still the writing just seemed more contrived than what I had previously experienced from Hobbs.
Rachel
Apr 28, 2012 Rachel rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Another fantastic YA offering by Will Hobbs. It's all about a boy, whose parent's run a seed farm, who loves all things ancient. He witnesses pot-hunters raiding artifacts and finds an ancient bone flute. You'll have to read to see what happens next. What I love is that the story has a magical realism element, the character is a believable boy and Hobbs expertly weaves in ancient lore to a modern story. I thoroughly enjoyed this book!
Emily Larson
Mar 21, 2009 Emily Larson rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: fiction, young-adult
This fast-paced story about a boy who becomes entangled dangerous modern-day pot-hunters and some powerful ancient magic kept me turning pages right until the end. While telling a very engaging story, Hobbs also managed to weave in some fascinating bits of woodrat ecology, American southwest history, Native American mythology, and agricultural theory. A good story with a good message.
Dayna Smith
Tepary Jones is fascinated by an ancient cliff dwelling called Picture House. One night he watches two grave robbers chip into the dwelling walls looking for priceless treasures. He scares them away and they leave behind an ancient bone flute. He knows he shouldn't keep the flute, but he does and when he puts it to his lips - the magic begins. Another Hobbs gem for boys.
Christy
THE MAGIC HAD ALWAYS BEEN THERE. Tep Jones has always felt the magic of Picture House, an Anasazi cliff dwelling near the seed farm where he lives with his parents. But he could never have imagined what would happen to him on the night of a lunar eclipse, when he finds a bone flute left behind by grave robbers. Tep falls under the spell of a powerful ancient magic that tr
Devon
Sep 02, 2008 Devon rated it did not like it  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: History teachers
Recommended to Devon by: My social studies teacher
Shelves: boring
OMG do not read this book! It was read by THE most boring social studies teacher ever!!!! Seriously, only read this book if you like history crap. Like, this boy finds some old ruins and finds a magical flute from some old geezer. That thing turns him into a rodent. The End. OOoohh, nice story, huh? Do not read this.
Stephanie
Sep 12, 2008 Stephanie rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
We wouldn't have read this book if we weren't New Mexicans, but I'm so glad we found this little treasure. It seems to be set in Bandelier, the National Monument set just outside Los Alamos, although the details and name are changed. The story has satisfying magic and mystery, and tons of local color.
David
Dec 19, 2008 David rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Read this with my son and middle daughter. They dug it, and I enjoyed it mostly, as well. The main character undergoes a singular transformation... not into a wolf or coyote or jaguar... into a packrat. Gotta love it! Effortlessly combines Southwestern indigenous lore with young adult concerns.
Patricia
Dec 28, 2013 Patricia rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
If you like books about american Indian mysticism, then this juvenile or young adult fiction book would be for you.
Molly
Nov 11, 2012 Molly rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
A favorite of mine. I first read it in the hospital in 8th grade and instantly adored it. It seems really dated in retrospect, but it was dated even when I read it (2001). It's still very good, though.
Judy
This has to be one of the only books for kids that addresses the fact that the plants we grow now have been modified over the years, and some people are trying to preserve the old lineages.
Marianne
Jul 25, 2008 Marianne rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
A magical flute helps Tepary save an ancient ruins from grave diggers. I really enjoyed this book and feel that young teens will also. Has that magic and hope and strength feeling.
Brittany
May 17, 2015 Brittany rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: fiction, book-club
I read this for a book club and I liked it more than I thought I would. This is a great story for any kid that likes animals, stories about Native Americans, and magic.
Alyssa
Sep 12, 2010 Alyssa rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
If you're into seed farming and native American lit, you'd like this quick read. I read a little extra about the Anasazi and Mesa Verde. Pretty interesting.
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WILL HOBBS is the author of seventeen novels for upper elementary, middle school and young adult readers, as well as two picture book stories. Seven of his novels, Bearstone, Downriver, The Big Wander, Beardance, Far North, The Maze, and Jason's Gold, were named Best Books for Young Adults by the American Library Association. ALA also named Far North and Downriver to their list of the 100 Best You ...more
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“Like everything else, the beans had exploded with growth in the last few days. "Holy jumping garbanzos!" my father declared. My mother answered with, "Great leapin' limas!” 0 likes
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