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Phonographies: Grooves in Sonic Afro-Modernity
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Phonographies: Grooves in Sonic Afro-Modernity

3.87 of 5 stars 3.87  ·  rating details  ·  23 ratings  ·  3 reviews
Phonographies explores the numerous links and relays between twentieth-century black cultural production and sound technologies from the phonograph to the Walkman. Highlighting how black authors, filmmakers, and musicians have actively engaged with recorded sound in their work, Alexander G. Weheliye contends that the interplay between sound technologies and black music and ...more
Paperback, 304 pages
Published May 20th 2005 by Duke University Press Books (first published April 29th 2005)
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Osvaldo
Three and a half stars, really.

(I need a macro for that).

Wehilye's insights are indispensable, but more than once I found he relied too heavily on the visual for what is supposed to be about the sonic. This is most clearly the case in his penultimate chapter where he writes more about the Fugees' videos than their actual musical and sonic content. But still, an examination of the Fugee's taking on the role of "refugee/immigrant" through the lens of Kristeva's theorization of the abject is fuckin
...more
Trevor
Phonographies is the book that cemented my decision to abandon a post-Bachelor's academic career in the humanities. This book is truly unreadable and I resented every page. Let me translate that for cultural studies grad students: "This [text] is/was truly un/re/disreadable and I (s/he) (p)resented every page."
Yejin
Alex Weheliye successfully disturbs and ruptures the carefully constructed dichotomies of modernity/afro-modernity, universalism/particularities, and authenticity/commodification through afro-sonic understandings of history.
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Alexander G. Weheliye is Professor of African American Studies and English at Northwestern University. He is the author of Phonographies: Grooves in Sonic Afro-Modernity and Habeas Viscus: Racializing Assemblages, Biopolitics, and Black Feminist Theories of the Human.
More about Alexander G. Weheliye...
Habeas Viscus: Racializing Assemblages, Biopolitics, and Black Feminist Theories of the Human Afrofuturism One Hundred Years of The Souls of Black Folk: A Celebration of W. E. B. Du Bois

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