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Le Lotus bleu (Tintin, #5)
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Le Lotus bleu (Tintin #5)

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4.0 of 5 stars 4.00  ·  rating details  ·  5,722 ratings  ·  141 reviews
Alors qu'il est toujours l'hôte du Maharadjah, Tintin reçoit la visited'un chinois qui doit lui dire quelque chose de très important. Mais au moment de parler, le chinois est touché par une fléchette de poison qui rend fou. Avant de sombrer dans la démence, le malheureux à le temps de prononcer deux choses: "Shangaï" et "Mitsuhirato".

Tintin, désireux de faire la lumière su
...more
Hardcover, 62 pages
Published July 1st 1999 by Casterman Editions (first published 1935)
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Community Reviews

(showing 1-30 of 3,000)
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Kim
After Tintin's travels in the Middle East and India he continues his investigation into the the mysterious drug-running organisation with the trial running into China. Set just prior to the Japanese invasion of Manchuria for the first time Hergé drops his European views and actually shows sympathy for the oppressed. Tintin teams up with the local Chinese to try and defeat the opium druglords and Japanese oppressors. He also dispels myths commonly held by Western society of the time which vilifie ...more
Harish Kumar Sarma Challapalli
As expected!! The plot is very intrigue!! It has a lot of incidents before the main plot starts, there are interesting twists!! This part is not very gripping like the first part!! The main antagonist was not revealed til the end and his role is very brief when compared to that of his in the previous episode! The allies of the main villain was given a lot of scope and their role was very constructively narrated!!

I think u may not find this very much interesting and at the same time not very much
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Marts  (Thinker)
Written around 1934 as a sequel to 'Cigars of the Pharaohs', in the 'Blue Lotus' Tintin's vacation in India is interrupted and he ends up in China during the time of Japanese occupation and in the midst of opium trafficking... Herge includes many real historical events of that time in this story...
Michael Gerald Dealino
This book immediately starts at the end of the Cigars of the Pharaoh. With this book, Herge becomes more provocative, as he takes on Japan's militarism and imperialism. The book was so stinging in its daring revelation of Japan's encroachments into China that the Japanese ambassador to Belgium (Herge was Belgian)filed a diplomatic protest. But Herge was right.
Dan Wilson
This, the fifth entry in the Tintin series, is the first one with anti-racist content. Much of the essence of this story is Orientalist, and the presentation of both Chinese and Japanese characters is crude caricature. However, it is refreshing to see Tintin politely but firmly stand up to a racist British settler: "Your conduct is disgraceful, sir!" Likewise, Tintin and his new friend Chang have an exchange in which Tintin says that "different peoples don't know enough about each other," then s ...more
Nicholas Whyte
http://nwhyte.livejournal.com/2194952.html[return][return]The Blue Lotus really is the first proper Tintin book - a huge step up from Cigars of the Pharaoh. Herg� takes Tintin to the real 1931 Japanese invasion of China, and is firmly and passionately on the side of the Chinese, both versus the Japanese and the Europeans in the Shanghai concession (one of whom in real life would have bee a very young J.G. Ballard). Apparently this came about because a priest who worked with Chinese students at L ...more
Dan
The Tintin stories for anyone who has read them and understands their history can't be viewed as anything other than groundbreaking. The beginnings of these stories have been around as long as the Lord of the Rings, the illustration and environments in the Tintin books are accurate and extremely detailed. Anyone who has spent even a little time exploring Herge (Georges Remi) can see the painstaking research and adversity he worked through to compose the world around Tintin. His ideas were ahead ...more
Michael Scott
This wonderful book evokes a lot of memories... When I was a kid my parents sent me to learn French at one of the many Institute Francais spread around the world. It was difficult, boring, and none of my friends seemed to care about it. Looking back, perhaps the only reason I stuck with it was that the Institute had a wonderful library, and in that library there was the entire collection of the Adventures of Tintin Les Aventures de Tintin. I can't even begin to describe what I liked about this c ...more
Tom Donaghey
THE BLUE LOTUS is the fifth in the series of collections of TINTIN by Hergé and the first that started him in actually doing extensive research into the culture of the land he was depicting. He also began using photo studies to increase the realism of his drawings. It shows in the finely detailed backgrounds and large panels of the action.
This is a follow up to the fourth book, CIGARS OF THE PHARAOH, but it stands alone quite well. We open with Tintin in India after his last adventure and is s
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Indah Threez Lestari
Setelah bertualang di Mesir, Arab dan India, nggak lengkap dong kalau Tintin tidak mampir ke tetangga sebelah, Cina. Apalagi sebelum terjerumus petualangan yang berhubungan dengan cerutu beropium, Tintin sebenarnya dalam perjalanan kapal ke Shanghai. Tidak afdol dong kalau berhenti sampai India saja.

Judul
Lotus Biru? Selama ini kalau baca cersil Kho Ping Hoo yang ada cuma perkumpulan Teratai Putih atau Teratai Merah. Rupanya teratai berwarna biru juga ada, dan beginilah penampakannya:



Cantik, ya
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Andrea Ika
The Blue Lotus (1936)
by Hergé (Author)

The classic graphic novel. A sequel to Cigars of the Pharaoh, Tintin follows a mysterious lead to China on the trail of a smuggling ring. Will Tintin find the criminal mastermind?

Review
As the story opens, we find Tintin in India, where we left him at the conclusion of "Cigars of the Pharoah." A Chinese visitor, who goes mysteriously insane before he can pass more than a few words of a message, prompts Tintin to travel to China with his faithful dog Snowy.
Tin
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Laela
This was a fast paced, straight to the point comic that had a very intriguing plot. It seems that most people read this as a part of the series, but I had to read this as an assignment for a class on Shanghai. Even though it's the 5th book in the series, it's very easy to pick up and understand what's going on.

There was one section that I liked where, through Tintin, the author comments on the tensions between the Europeans and the Chinese people living in the Shanghai area. It was very true to
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Gina
I think this might be my favorite Tintin book, mostly for the scenes set in an opium den. You don't see that too much in children's books anymore.
Anna
Aug 03, 2011 Anna rated it 5 of 5 stars
Shelves: bd
Le saut qualitatif par rapport aux débuts de la série est assez stupéfiant.
Cet album est extrêmement bien mené, avec un récit plein de rebondissements délicieux, de quiproquos, de trahisons et de courses-poursuites. L'action se situe immédiatement après Les Cigares du Pharaon et les intrigues de deux albums entrent en résonance, même si Le Lotus Bleu peut tout à fait être lu indépendamment. On se plonge dans les décors de Shanghai avec une grande facilité.
En outre, le récit est très lié à son é
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Michael
The best of the Tintin stories so far (I'm reading and rating them in order of publication): Hergé has really hit his stride with The Blue Lotus.

Nicely plotted with lots of intrigue to which we, the reader, are more privy than Tintin. An interesting device to increase narrative tension: "No, Tintin - don't trust him!"

Hergé, it seems, seeks to atone for his previously less than flattering representation of non-European cultures by rather heavy-handedly debunking some then-prevalent stereotypes of
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David Sarkies
Apr 19, 2014 David Sarkies rated it 4 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Those who have read 'Cigars of the Pharaoh'
Recommended to David by: Herge
Shelves: adventure
Herge begins to redeem himself on the eve of World War II
4 February 2012

This is the sequel to Cigars of the Pharaoh, and while Cigars can probably be read on its own, it is much better to read this one after one has read Cigars since it can be a little difficult picking it up where Herge left off. Obviously this album was also serialised, but in this one the criticism that has been levelled against Herge for depicting foreign cultures from Euro-centric point of view has levelled off, particular
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Sammy
My review, as posted in Tintin Books

After a polite request was made that Hergé be sensitive in his portrayal of the Chinese, the artist went to great pains to accurately render the culture of China (although his portrayal of the Japanese may still have warranted some chastisement). This cultural investigation led the author to a personal ideology of freedom and cultural acceptance which would inform his later works.

China's leader ended up inviting Herge to a state visit due to his pleasure with
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Sammy
My review, as posted in Tintin Books

After a polite request was made that Hergé be sensitive in his portrayal of the Chinese, the artist went to great pains to accurately render the culture of China (although his portrayal of the Japanese may still have warranted some chastisement). This cultural investigation led the author to a personal ideology of freedom and cultural acceptance which would inform his later works.

China's leader ended up inviting Herge to a state visit due to his pleasure with
...more
Patrick
Tintin is staying in India because the fakir he saved wants to reward him.A messenger comes and is able to only tell him something about Shanghai and a guy named Mitsuhirato,when he is struck by a dart dipped in Rahjaijah, the poison of madness.Later,he gets a letter telling him to go to Taiping Road and sees his rescuer, who has been poisoned to insanity.The next day,Mitsuhirato bids him farewell as he stes sail for India.But during the voyage,two men kidnap him and bring him to the house of hi ...more
Helmut
Le Lotus Bleu...

... gewinnt viel durch seine Darstellung des Chinesisch-Japanischen Konflikts. Während Hergé in seinen frühen Bänden (Au pays des Soviets, Tintin au Congo, Tintin en Amérique) noch mit klassischen, für die Zeit üblichen Stereotypen Rassismusvorwürfe provoziert, ist er hier schon klar einen Schritt weiter, verfällt aber immer noch in eine urteilende Darstellung der zwei Konfliktparteien. Während er in Tintin au Tibet die gegnerischen Parteien (Chinesen und Tibeter) zwar auch klar
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Andrian Liu
This book is about Tintin going to china it starts when Tintin intercepted a message in code words then he meets a messenger that is struck with poison before he was struck he told Tintin that he was needed in china. Then he went to china right after he arrived he receives a message that he must come to see a man called MR. Mitsuhitaro. when he met MR. Mitsuhitaro he told him that the man he is living with in India is in danger and he must return at once and Tintin trust him and returned to Indi ...more
Matthew Hunter
Far and away my favorite of the Tintin's thus far. The Blue Lotus brings closure to the action in Cigars of the Pharaoh. And for the first time, Tintin stands up to racist behavior: "Your conduct is disgraceful sir!" And an exchange later in the story seeks to dispel stereotypes between Chinese and European people:
CHANG: "I thought all white devils were wicked, like those who killed my grandfather and grandmother long ago. During the War of Righteous and Harmonious Fists, my father said."

TINTIN:
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Leila Anani
Continuing from Cigar's of the Pharaoh, Tintin chases the boss of the opium smuggling racket to China.

Particularly fond of this one. Little things like the Thom(p)son Twins disguising themselves as Chinamen, Tintin popping up out of a Chinese vase and lots of daring escapes, rescues and disguises make this really fun.

It has a strong story (much more cohesive than the first book), wonderfully detailed artwork and I love the whole Oriental feel.
Rahma Dilla (seetheworldwithbooks)
Sekali lagi aku tanya, ada ga sih petualangan Tintin yang ga seru?? ini masih ada hubungannya sama 'Cerutu Sang faraoh', so you better read that first :) aku suka cerita Tintin, yang ini juga suka, habis dia cerdik banget nyelesain semua masalahnya. Kenapa ya penulis detektif series itu otaknya encer banget? wehehehe oh btw I ADORE THOMSON AND THOMPSON XD THEY'RE FREAKING FUNNY <33333
Nadia Fadhillah
Lumayaaan.
Ternyata ceritanya bersambung dari nomer empat.
Ada banyak moralnya sih di buku ini.
Seperti pada obrolan Tintin dengan Zang. Saling bertukar cerita bagaimana penduduk eropa memandang penduduk china, dan sebaliknya. Kemudian menemukan bahwa ya persepsi negatif itu salah semua.

Aku baca dua bahasa sekaligus; Bahasa Prancis dan Bahasa Indonesia.
West
This is the first Tintin book I ever read so I really like this book. My favorite character is Chang. Tintin was in China and Chang was drowning in the water from a flood Tintin herd him yell and he rescued him. When Tintin is in china he is being chased by a gang. Dose he get shot you will find out when you finish reading it.
Dan
The Tintin stories for anyone who has read them and understands their history can't be viewed as anything other than groundbreaking. The beginnings of these stories have been around as long as the Lord of the Rings, the illustration and environments in the Tintin books are accurate and extremely detailed. Anyone who has spent even a little time exploring Herge (Georges Remi) can see the painstaking research and adversity he worked through to compose the world around Tintin. His ideas were ahead ...more
Emily
Herge is a Belgium-born comic writer, he studies in France for several years and perhaps knowledge is not the only thing he gained in France, but also an important friend who is going to be a huge part of his life later-on. His name, is Chang Jong-ren, a Chinese student studing in college in France. Chang was introduced to Herge by Father, the two got along quickly and very well. Herge devised to draw a book of Tintin going to Shanghai, China, in 1940s(the era in which they were living in), and ...more
Bukko lover
I don;t get why this series is so popular. till now it has only been a mediocre series that is unable to grasp my attention. maybe i need to read the later stories to get a feel of the refined work of Herge. but 5 comics in is just as good a dabbling in any comic series. *sigh* i guess its just not my cup of tea.
Stven
This is not quite the full brilliance of Tintin. It's rather too wordy -- newspaper clippings, coded messages, notes from the police, etc., all presented for our reading pleasure, and even the texts of the word balloons packed with more exposition than seems completely necessary. We rely on Hergé more often for a comedic (and dramatic) timing to make his plots run smoothly with less bulk and belaboring. Nevertheless, there is plenty here to enjoy. The draftsmanship is superb as always. There are ...more
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2802356
Georges Prosper Remi (22 May 1907 – 3 March 1983), better known by the pen name Hergé, was a Belgian comics writer and artist.
His best known and most substantial work is The Adventures of Tintin comic book series, which he wrote and illustrated from 1929 until his death in 1983, leaving the twenty-fourth Tintin adventure Tintin and Alph-Art unfinished. His work remains a strong influence on comics
...more
More about Hergé...
Tintin in Tibet (Tintin, #20) Tintin in the Land of the Soviets (Tintin, #1) Red Rackham's Treasure (Tintin, #12) The Secret of the Unicorn (Tintin, #11) Cigars of the Pharaoh (Tintin, #4)

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