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Wartime Writings 1939-1944

3.92  ·  Rating Details ·  93 Ratings  ·  9 Reviews
This volume includes the aviator's letters to friends, autobiographical fragments, and meditations. Translated by Norah Purcell; Introduction by Anne Morrow Lindbergh; Index.
Paperback, 264 pages
Published November 4th 2002 by Mariner Books (first published 1982)
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Eric Hinkle
Mar 26, 2013 Eric Hinkle rated it it was amazing
This collection includes Tonio's "Letter to a Hostage" which alone is worth any price you might pay for this book. In its 17 pages the very essence of Antoine's soul are condensed. Beautiful, true, and tear-jerking, it's one of the greatest things I've ever read - basically on par with The Little Prince or Wind, Sand and Stars, which are two of the best books yet written. And this letter is just a fraction of what's in the 215 pages of this completely essential collection. Mostly consisting of ...more
Eric Hinkle
Mar 26, 2013 Eric Hinkle rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
This collection includes Tonio's "Letter to a Hostage" which alone is worth any price you might pay for this book. In its 17 pages the very essence of Antoine's soul are condensed. Beautiful, true, and tear-jerking, it's one of the greatest things I've ever read - basically on par with The Little Prince or Wind, Sand and Stars, which are two of the best books yet written. And this letter is just a fraction of what's in the 215 pages of this completely essential collection. Mostly consisting of ...more
Phyllis
Nothing here was written with the intent of producing a book. We have bits of letters, the occasional essay, recollections of others. So it's a bit of a mishmash and much of it is fragments. And as long as you can live with that, it's fine.

Saint-Exupery was a French pilot and he seems to have loved being a pilot when he was young and the whole field of aviation was a novelty. But the Saint-Exupery we meet in this book is a bitter Frenchman in exile. The fall of France has disturbed him, he canno
...more
Zach
Although I have poured over Saint-Ex's The Little Prince many times, this is my first foray into his other works. WOW. I look forward to reading every sentence of his I can find. Antoine de Saint-Exupéry writes with an intelligence (of both mind & heart) that is on fire, a white light-white heat variety, and he blazes new trails in the reader's mind & heart.

"If you were just soldiers, I would speak to you as soldiers. I would say: 'Put aside all other problems, there is only one that co
...more
Catie
Sep 29, 2013 Catie rated it it was amazing
I first read this when I was seventeen and the library copy is marked up in my penciled underlinings. It was the first time I'd met a kindred spirit in a writer, and St. Ex's thoughts and feelings are still so alive and essential all these years later.
Clay Olmstead
Oct 28, 2015 Clay Olmstead rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: history
First-class, first-person history of a dramatic time. The only possible regret is that Saint-Exupéry didn't survive to contribute to the literary and political path of post-war France.
Christine
May 03, 2011 Christine rated it it was amazing
A great foray into the life of a great pilot, author, and man. A must-read for all WWII buffs and Saint-Ex fans.
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Antoine de Saint-Exupéry was born in Lyons on June 29, 1900. He flew for the first time at the age of twelve, at the Ambérieu airfield, and it was then that he became determined to be a pilot. He kept that ambition even after moving to a school in Switzerland and while spending summer vacations at the family's château at Saint-Maurice-de-Rémens, in eastern France. (The house at Saint-Maurice ...more
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“One writes not to be read but to breathe...one writes to think, to pray, to analyze. One writes to clear one's mind, to dissipate one's fears, to face one's doubts, to look at one's mistakes--in order to retrieve them. One writes to capture and crystallize one's joy, but also to disperse one's gloom. Like prayer--you go to it in sorrow more than joy, for help, a road back to 'grace'."
— Anne Morrow Lindbergh (War Within and Without: Diaries and Letters of Anne Morrow Lindbergh 1939-1944)”
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“How difficult it is to advance at one's own internal rhythm when one is constantly fighting against the inertia of the material world. Everything is always on the verge of stopping.” 3 likes
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