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Across The Wide And Lonesome Prairie: The Oregon Trail Diary Of Hattie Campbell (Dear America)

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3.94 of 5 stars 3.94  ·  rating details  ·  4,482 ratings  ·  222 reviews
Now that we're in the North Platte River Valley the air feels dry and thin. My lips are so chapped they bleed when I talk. The only thing to do is dip our fingers in to the bucket of axle grease and rub our lips every hour or so. It smells bad, it tastes bad, and the blowing dust sticks.

It feels like we must be halfway to Oregon, but Tall Joe says, no, we've only gone five

...more
Hardcover, 140 pages
Published March 1st 1997 by Scholastic Inc.
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Voyage on the Great Titanic by Ellen Emerson WhiteAcross The Wide And Lonesome Prairie by Kristiana GregoryThe Winter of Red Snow by Kristiana GregoryStanding in the Light by Mary Pope OsborneA Coal Miner's Bride by Susan Campbell Bartoletti
Dear America Series
2nd out of 42 books — 181 voters
The Book Thief by Markus ZusakA Great and Terrible Beauty by Libba BrayNumber the Stars by Lois LowryThe Luxe by Anna GodbersenThe Witch of Blackbird Pond by Elizabeth George Speare
Teen Historical Fiction
107th out of 852 books — 2,208 voters


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Community Reviews

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Nattie
I enjoyed the story. I am a huge fan of pretty much all "Wagons Ho!", fiction, unless it is really bad. I found myself slightly annoyed. It seems that the book was obviously trying to avoid the big SEX word, but kept mentioning things that you know involved sex. I'd rather the subject was ignored completly if you're going to have scenes like the ones where Hattie asks the new 14-year-old brides what it's like to have a husband and they both blush redder than a red crayon. I guess the only things ...more
Mary Alice
I loved this book! Our family had just moved from upstate New York to New Hampshire at the end of the summer of 2005. Our daughter Olivia asked me to read this book with her. We started out reading this book together and one by one the rest of our family would gather to hear us read until "it" became the event of each evening or rainy weekend afternoon.
I think we were drawn to this story because in our own way, we had left "everything" behind; (family, friends, our church, home, a pet, furnitur
...more
Kirsten
Good read it made me get wet eyes and laugh.
It helped me under stand what it was like crossing the river and walking for miles with out end but also the good times they had when the camped for the night and the thief your old friends could become.i also like in the back there is a historical note and pictures.
Audrey
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Rebecca
I first read this book in March 1997 when it was first published and it was one of my favorite books ever. It brings the Oregon Trail to life and puts faces on the countless brave pioneers who braved the hardships of the trail to make new lives in the west. The narrator is a fictional thirteen-year-old farm girl from Missouri, Hattie Campbell. Through her diary, written in a voice that truly sounds as if it belongs to a young girl from that time, the reader experiances the events of Hattie's jou ...more
Berdena Beamer
Across the Wide and Lonesome Prairie: The Oregon Trail Diary of Hattie Campbell is a really good historical book. I would recommend this book for grades fourth through sixth. It is the first Dear America book that I have read. The story starts in the spring of 1847. It is a good depiction of how it was back then to ride a wagon train across the United States to start a new life. There were several families who gathered in Independence, Missouri, where the Oregon Trail started. They traveled nort ...more
Lauren Vevoda
This was my favorite book as a kid!! I still remember the story to this day :)
Jessica Mcmahon
Sometimes, to get through hard times, you must remind yourself of the treasures you are thriving for. When Hattie's family decides to move west in 1847, everyone thinks good or bad of it. Her father looks forward to staring a new life, leaving the last. Her mother is all tears, having to leave the place in which her dead children reside in. Hattie's brothers don't think of it much- they are young and naive. And Hattie doesn't know what to think- she has to leave her home and friends behind, but ...more
Sydney
I did and did not this book. A lot of mixed feelings, but I love that it was written as a dairy entry, more then a normal chapter book, it's more exciting. Any-who the story takes place back in 1840's, and is seen though the eyes of young Hattie Campbell. As she and her family are making there way across America to their promise land in Oregon. Sense it is written in a Dairy format, I think like all the other dear America book well actually I'm not sure cause this is the first book that I have r ...more
xDearAmericaIsCoolx
This is an awesome book and I absolutely would love to read it! Even though I've never read it, it sounds cool.
(Expect for people dying left and right.) I can see myself through Hattie's eyes!


I also can relate to the Indians' scare thing.
I am not judgemental, I can just see myself through Hattie's eyes, nor do I have anything againest Indians.


Overall this looks like an awesome book and I will so have my Library get it from a nearby library so I can check it out! :) Across The Wide And Lonesome Prairie The Oregon Trail Diary Of Hattie Campbell by Kristiana GregoryKristiana Gregory
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Beverly
In 1847, Natives were a perceived threat, but did not happen. It was a different story by 1848. This book has a good description of a family walking/riding west for 3 or 4 months. Babies are born and some die. Children wander off and never return. What I will remember about this book is the difference between parsnip and water hemlock.
Hattie inadvertantly kills 2 young children by cutting up water hemlock, thinking it was parsnip.

* Carrots and Parsnips have a long single root.

* Water hemlock loo
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Kamren
OMG this was an amazing book when you are as young as me you need to read books like this i didnt not like on bit of it!!
Sharon Johnson
I loved this book and even though it is historical fiction it is a great story
Nannette
At first the book had a bit too much of Little House on the Prairie (lots of wagons on the prairie) feel to my liking. But after a while I sort of got caught up in the story. Those first pioneers certainly had their share of danger and hardship. The second part of the book I found especially interesting as it depicted daily life on the Oregon trail. The photographs and illustrations really brought the story to life. In my opinion this would be excellent reading for youngsters wanting to know mor ...more
Megan Marie
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Heather
I think that this will live on as one of my favorite books in this extensive series. It brought back all of my childhood memories of playing the very first Oregon Trail game! Do you remember fording the Blue River, oxen dying, eating poisonous plants, breaking an axle? I do! All that and much more takes place in the diary of Hattie Campbell.

One of the great strengths of this book is the emotions that are evoked. Westward travel was certainly not easy. There were moments of terror, sadness, happi
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Taunalee Clark
Hattie Campbell's father has just announced that they are going to Oregon. The Campbells now have to leave their old life behind and cross the plains to their new home. This book chronicles the joys, challenges, and heartaches of the pioneer lifestyle, through the eyes of a 14-year-old girl.

I have loved the Dear America series since seventh grade. I adore historical fiction, and I have always thought these books are the perfect way to introduce teens to prominent historical events in America's h
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Rebecca
In the spring of 1847, thirteen-year-old Hattie Campbell and her family leave their home in Missouri to travel west in a covered wagon on the Oregon Trail. Hattie is sad to leave her home and her best friend, as well as the graves of her little sisters who died.

In her diary, Hattie writes of all the hardships her family and others in their wagon train experience. The pioneers face sickness, dangerous river crossings. Many people do not survive. But despite all the sadness, there is happiness to
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Vikki
I really did enjoy this little children's book Across the Wide and Lonesome Prairie by Kristiana Gregory. I chose it because on a recent vacation at the Westin Hotel in Crown Center in Kansas City, Missouri, I noticed the Coterie Theatre was putting on the play based on this book. After reading a rather difficult, slow-moving book, I wanted to read something where the pages turned quickly. I thought a children's book was just the ticket. And it was!
This was the story of Hattie Campbell who wi
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Turtle
Feb 02, 2014 Turtle rated it 5 of 5 stars
Recommends it for: Indepedent Readers
Recommended to Turtle by: Elementary School Librarian
This was one of my favorite Dear America books for good reason. It reads the most like a "found journal". Even the bookmark ribbon is explained. I think this was the book that inspired me to start a journal back when I was twelve years old myself. I got a journal for my birthday and started writing in it in the hopes that it would be to me like what Hattie's was to hers.

It was sad, just like I predicted. My sister recalled the hemlock scene from when she read the book. And yup, that was in here
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Ana Mardoll
Across the Wide Prairie (Oregon Trail) / 0-590-22651-7

I love Oregon Trail stories, probably as a remnant of my childhood obsession over the video game series of the same name. I couldn't wait to read this installment of the Dear America series.

The Dear America formula works very well here. The diary format is well-suited to a long journey, and fits realistically here as the main character sits down by the fire at the end of the evening to record the days' experiences. The day-to-day account is g
...more
Elaine Shipley-pope
This is perhaps my favorite Dear America book. Its filled with adventure and lots of both sad and cheerful events. Many of which are unexpected. Hattie Campbell and her family travel the Organ trail in a wagon train, taking on the six month journey after several unfortunate family events. Her family makes several strong friendships along they way which leads to a variety of wonderful characters. Over all its a pretty good book and I think it will be an excellent homeschooling resource in the fut ...more
Teigen Grubl
I thought it was a very good book that fell under a memoir. It told the challenges and hardships that Hattie, along with many others, had to endure on their trip to Oregon to start a new life. There was a lot of death on the trip, which were usually caused by accidents. There were also thieves, who were later disowned from the group. It had to be extremely hard, when their lips were dry, they used the grease from wagon wheels to help cure the problem.
Lucy Magat
We were required to read this book for Social Studies because we are currently studying about the Oregon Trail. I'm glad that I get to read this book and it tells you how life was back then. This book is about Hattie Campbell and her family when they got a free trip to travel anywhere they want. Her father chose to Oregon Trail and this tells you how Hattie's life was during the journey and how hard was to travel back in 1800s. I recommend it to people who like to read Historical Fiction.
Richard
This book, geared for young adults, reads like an actual journal but is fictionalized journal of a 13 year old girl, Hattie Campbell, as she recounts in first person the trip from Independence Missouri to the Willamette valley in Oregon. It really does read like a journal a 13 year old girl would write. There are many difficult times along the journey which include various forms of death from missing children to drowning in the rivers during crossings and eating of poisons plants. I found it to ...more
Sarah (falbio)
I loved this book, I had so moments where I just put the book down and ball my eyes out. I could read this so many times and still ball my eyes out! I recommended this book to people who like reading about anything to do with history related. And this author is incredible. I hope to reread this book once again! X3
Abby Johnson
Not my favorite of the Dear America books I've listened to. Nothing wrong with the audio recording or narration. The subject matter is a little more mature than some of the others I've read - people dying left and right on the Oregon Trail. My main problem was that I hated the main character. Just, personally I could not connect with her. She was so judgmental! And yes, she did change her mind about being afraid of the Indians by the end, and yes, I get that in the 1800s being afraid of Indians ...more
Kate
This book was really good at describing the troubles that occured in the Oregon Trail. This book really knows how to make kids want to read and learn about the Oregon Trail.When i read this i just knew i had to show it with my class.It was well worth reading and i would love to read it 20 more times.
Lindsey
Publisher: Scholastic, 1997
Interest Level: 5-8
Lexile Level: 940

Summary: Hattie Campbell, a 13 year old girl travels the Oregon Trail with her family. Through Hattie's eyes, readers see the trials and tribulations of the long journey.

Review: Throughout the story the author does an excellent job changing the voice of Hattie from hopeful and happy, to frustrated and almost angry with her families situation. Throughout the story, Gregory adds in historical details about common Oregon Trail journeys
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Debbie Jarrell
When I bought this book I thought it was an actual diary that someone had published. But when I saw that it was fiction, it lost some of it's charm. This is more appropriate for young girls I think, but it probably gives a good description of pioneer life along the Oregon trail.
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Across The Wide And Lonsome Prarie 6 12 Oct 23, 2014 10:46AM  
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10886
Kristiana Gregory grew up in Manhattan Beach, California, two blocks from the ocean. She's always loved to make up stories [ask her family!], telling her younger siblings whoppers that would leave them wide-eyed and shivering. Her first rejection letter at age ten was for a poem she wrote in class when she was supposed to be doing a math assignment. She's had a myriad of odd jobs: telephone operat ...more
More about Kristiana Gregory...

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  • So Far From Home: the Diary of Mary Driscoll, an Irish Mill Girl, Lowell, Massachusetts, 1847 (Dear America)
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