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In The Presence of The Sun: Stories and Poems
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In The Presence of The Sun: Stories and Poems

3.83  ·  Rating Details ·  65 Ratings  ·  3 Reviews
In the Presence of the Sun is a celebration of works of extraordinary range by the accomplished author and artist N. Scott Momaday. A glorious testament to our Native American past, this collection of thirty years of work from 1961 through 1991 is a concentration of riches and proof of the persistence of the human spirit. This volume features over seventy poems, sixteen ne ...more
Paperback, 176 pages
Published September 15th 1993 by St. Martin's Griffin (first published 1992)
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Michael
This was an interesting read. I’m not sure I ever would have picked it up on my own. But I appreciated so much of this. The Southwestern images and stories that ran throughout were rich. My favorite section was the section on Billy the Kid - as if he were Billy the Kid’s companion on the trail. It read true to me.
Katherine Holmes
Jul 17, 2011 Katherine Holmes rated it it was amazing
Very much liked the author's voice and his images add to that. I don't usually read so many poems in one sitting but his have correspondence, one to the next, and, like the short prose, it creates a narrative such as his section on shields. The book is a pastiche of poetry, prose about Billy the Kid, observances that are like sayings, a great texture for reading through the book.
Jeffrey Bumiller
Aug 09, 2013 Jeffrey Bumiller rated it really liked it
Simple poems that pack at lot of punch. Some of these pieces are very zen like, heavy on beauty and wisdom.
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64204
N. Scott Momaday's baritone voice booms from any stage. The listener, whether at the United Nations in New York City or next to the radio at home, is transported through time, known as 'kairos"and space to Oklahoma near Carnegie, to the "sacred, red earth" of Momaday's tribe.

Born Feb. 27, 1934, Momaday's most famous book remains 1969's House Made of Dawn, the story of a Pueblo boy torn between th
...more
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“There was a man who killed a buffalo bull to no purpose, only he wanted the blood on his hands.” 6 likes
“We perceive existence by means of words and names. To this or that vague, potential thing I will give a name, and it will exist thereafter, and its existence will be clearly perceived. The name enables me to see it. I can call it by its name, and I can see it for what it is.” 6 likes
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