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Negeri Kaum Budak

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3.73  ·  Rating Details ·  2,693 Ratings  ·  237 Reviews

A few years after its liberation from the brutality of French colonial rule in 1803, Haiti endured a period of even greater brutality under the reign of King Henri-Christophe, who was born a slave in Grenada but rose to become the first black king in the Western Hemisphere. In prose of often dreamlike coloration and intensity, Alejo Carpentier records the destruction of th

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Paperback, 172 pages
Published 2007 by Olongia (first published 1949)
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Robert R. Unfortunately, there is no e-book version of the translation to English, at least not to date. (answer as of 18 March 2016)
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Community Reviews

(showing 1-30)
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Eric
My plan for the month is to read everything he's written. I bought this five hours ago and have read it twice.
Teresa
Sep 17, 2015 Teresa rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: n-suica, l-1001bymrbyd, e2
O Reino Deste Mundo - narrado no estilo realismo mágico, característico de Alejo Carpentier - é a história da revolução Haitiana e do seu mítico líder Mackandal, morto na fogueira em 1758.

Alguns comentários sobre esta novela e o seu autor:
Mário Vargas Llosa
"uma das mais acabadas que a língua espanhola já produziu.;
Le Figaro Littéraire
"O melhor romance que apareceu na América Latina dos nossos tempos.";
O Editor
"Carpentier alcança o ser humano de forma única. A sua obra é insubstituível e incompa
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brian
Oct 15, 2008 brian rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
a brilliant and tragic novella about the Haitian liberation from French rule and the government which follows as seen through the eyes of Ti-Noel, a slave. along with mariano azuela's the underdogs i cannot think of a book that more effectively illustrates the final words of orwell's animal farm:

"No question now, what had happened to the faces of the pigs. The creatures outside looked from pig to man, and from man to pig, and from pig to man again; but already it was impossible to say which was
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Zuberino


কিছু কিছু বই আছে - পাঠকের অতীতের সমসত পড়াকে মুহূরতের জনযে হলেও মলান করে দেয়, বানের জোয়ারের মত ভাসিয়ে নিয়ে যায়, "সাহিতয" বলতে আজ পরযনত যা কিছু বুঝে এসেছি সেই সমসত ধারণা উড়িয়ে দিয়ে গুঁড়িয়ে দিয়ে সাহিতযের পরকৃত সমভাবনা সমপরকে একটি আভাস দিয়ে চলে যায়। চকিতের সেই সপরশ - কিনতু অভাগা পাঠকের সুখশানতি চিরতরে নষট করে দেবার জনযে ততটুকুই বোধহয় যথেষট। আরেকটিবার সেই ছোঁয়া পাবার জনযে হনযে হয়ে খুঁজতে পারি বাকি জীবন - কিনতু অধরা সবপনের মতোই, ঈপসিতা নারীর মতোই সেই অনুভূতি ধরাছোঁয়ার বাইরে থেকে যায়।

মহাকালের হাতছানির
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Jeff Jackson
Feb 06, 2014 Jeff Jackson rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: book-club-2
Violent slave uprisings, the reign of the first black king of Haiti, the perverse twilight of European decadence, and the pervasive role of voodoo - all recounted in a lush and sensory prose style that was clearly the inspiration for Gabriel Garcia Marquez's own sentences. Written in 1949, "The Kingdom of this World" is also the precursor of the Latin American literary boom in general.

A book about animism, it's narrated from the inside-out, skipping between consciousnesses and spanning years wi
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Simon
May 18, 2010 Simon rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Interesting and beautiful. Not my cup of tea though.

By the way, since the distortedness of book and movie blurbs is a pet peeve of mine, let me reflect a bit on the racist boiler-plate pap that appears in the blurb above and (in a slightly different version) on the cover of my edition of the book. Here it is:

"A few years after its liberation from the brutality of French colonial rule in 1803, Haiti endured a period of even greater brutality under the reign of King Henri-Christophe, who was born
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Mohammad
برای من شنیدن اسم آلخو کارپانتیه همیشه با نوعی احساس ترس هیجان انگیز همراه بوده.در قلمرو این عالم تاریخ افسانهای هائیتی با سبک رئالیسم جادویی روایت میشود.گابریل گارسیا مارکز پیشگفتار این رمان را نخستین متن نظری دربارهی رئالیسم جادویی میداند.و من هنوز نمیدانم چرا با رئالیسم جادویی ارتباط برقرار نمیکنم و یا اصلا روزی این ارتباط برقرار میشود یا نه.

با این حال از خواندن کتاب لذت بردم و امیدوارم روزي کتاب دیگر کارپانتیه یعنی "گام های گمشده"را بخوانم
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Joselito Honestly and Brilliantly
Haiti. A slave revolt. The end of the French rule. The first Negro king. His overthrow. Slaves deposing masters, becoming new masters with their own slaves, then being thrown out themselves. "This endless return of chains, this rebirth of shackles, this proliferation of suffering, (this) proof of the uselessness of all revolt."

The language is laconic, desert-like and strange. Of legends and lore, superstitions, magical powers, numbing brutality, sex, alien names and places.

And a typo, towards th
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Vit Babenco
Feb 28, 2016 Vit Babenco rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Lewdness and avarice rule the world… And those in thrall want freedom in order to be free to rape and rob…
“After bathing their arms in the blood of the white man, the Negroes ran toward the big house, shouting death to the master, to the Governor, to God, and to all the Frenchmen in the world. But driven by a longstanding thirst, most of them rushed to the cellar looking for liquor. Pick blows demolished kegs of salt fish. Their staves sprung, casks began to gush wine, reddening the women’s skir
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Matt
For a "literature and politics" class. Looking forward to it...

hyperviolent, blazingly paced, surreal, satirically grotesque, oeneric gallows humor elaborately detailed with its almost breathless nightmare of vision. It reminds me of the old canard about the monster of revolution eating its children, almost as if by natural law. The story of Haiti, in Carpentier's eyes, seems to match up with that rather grim proclamation.

They say this is one of the forerunner of magical realism, and it's not h
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Nick
Jul 18, 2008 Nick rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Extraordinary. This is the book where Carpentier is credited with introducing the concept of "Magical Realism" (His actual term was "real marvelloso"). The book covers the history of Haiti from Macandal's uprising through the revolution that tossed out the French, to Henri Christophe's brutal regime and the building of his fortress that never fired a shot, to his downfall and the rise of the next brand of tyranny. The story is narrated through a few characters, but primarily through an ancient ( ...more
Eadweard
May 22, 2014 Eadweard rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: fiction-read
I had never heard of Alejo Carpentier until I came across this neat book, sadly, it's quite short (my edition was 89 pages).
Erika Schoeps
4.5 stars.

I actually finished this over a month ago, but then didn't just sit down to review this. I even began this review once or twice but was unable to finish it. Not because of any feelings I had about this book either... I'm just busy, and I'll do dumb shit like start a review repeatedly and then abandon it. I feel like I'm doing such a good book an injustice for letting my enthusiasm wane for over a month before finally getting around to this review.

I had my ups and downs with this book,
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Zoe Brooks
Feb 22, 2014 Zoe Brooks rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: magic-realism
This review first appeared on the magic realism blog - http://magic-realism-books.blogspot.com

This is arguably the book that launched Latin American magic realism. First published in 1949, the book opens with a prologue which sets out to distinguish what the Cuban author calls the "marvellous reality" of Latin America from the surrealist marvellous of Europe: But what many forget, in disguising themselves as cheap magicians, is that the marvellous becomes unequivocally marvellous when it arises
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Beau Craparo
Jan 22, 2010 Beau Craparo rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Alejo Carpentier uses his novel The Kingdom of This World to warn Cuban citizens about the risks involved with overthrowing the government. Carpentier describes the fictional life of Ti Noel, a slave who takes part in the Haitian Revolution, to help warn his countrymen about how revolutionary leaders can abandon their promises of a better life for the average citizen in order to achieve greater personal glory and wealth. His writing shows that people must have realistic expectations for the fut ...more
Danielle
Jan 23, 2012 Danielle rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
The Kingdom of This World is truly a must-read for anyone even remotely interested in Haiti. Alejo Carpentier’s vivid descriptions bring Haiti to life and acknowledge both the hardship and success its people have experienced for more than three hundred years. Perhaps most noteably, the novel offers a sharp contrast to many non-Haitian people’s notion that Haiti is simply another unimportant, undeveloped, Third World country and celebrates all that Haiti has overcome and its journey toward a bett ...more
Sixto Ortiz
Sep 23, 2013 Sixto Ortiz rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Excelente novela. Carpentier a través de su prosa nos lleva por Haití en los años de mucha inestabilidad política. Con su técnica denominada como lo "real-maravilloso" describe escenarios únicos en esta isla caribeña con un toque sobre-natural o místico (similar al realismo mágico). A través de la novela hay muchas referencias a los "orishas" y el "voodoo" y sobre todo una presencia constante de la música. Realmente fue una experiencia gratificante leer su prosa y sobre todo pude aprender un poc ...more
Brad Harder
Jan 24, 2012 Brad Harder rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
There's no doubt that Carpentier's novel, "The Kingdom of This World," is a masterful exercise in story-telling. His construction of a free indirect third person narrator allows him to leverage a reader's sympathy for Ti Noël's experiences while also providing Carpentier with the freedom to move to other characters' perspectives throughout the novel. His inclusion of multiple viewpoints speaks to the heterogeneous complexity of Haiti's evolving identity during this time period and it also dramat ...more
Ahmad Sharabiani
El reino de este mundo, Alejo Carpentier
عنوان: قلمرو این عالم ؛ آلخو کارپانتیه؛ مترجم: کاوه میرعباسی؛ تهران، نشر نیکا، 1391، در 175 ص؛ شابک: 9786005906455؛
Gina Whitlock
Oct 12, 2016 Gina Whitlock rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
I read this short book in one sitting. A few years after the brutality of French rule ended, Haiti went through an even worse period when black King Henri Christophe ruled. The story is told by elderly slave Ti Noel and in magical realism, covers the Macandal uprising, revealing the voodoo, violence, and racial hatred.
Beth
Walking, walking, up and down, down and up, the Negro began to think that the chamber music orchestras of San Souci, the splendor of the uniforms, and the statues of naked white women soaking up the sun on their scrolled pedestals among the sculptured boxwood hedging the flowerbeds were all the product of a slavery as abominable as that he had known on the plantation of M. Lenormand de Mézy. Even worse, for there was a limitless affront in being beaten by a Negro as black as oneself, as thick-li ...more
Marc Kozak
This was a quick, enjoyable book about the progress of Haiti in the 1800s. It's one of the earliest examples of what we're now calling "magical realism", so every once in a while we have a guy who turns into any animal he thinks of, or a ghost who arrives and is very spooky and forces dramatic changes in politics. Y'know, the usual.

In a very Animal Farm fashion, the Haitian slaves revolt and overthrow their masters only to create a society based on even harsher slavery and inequality. The meat o
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David
Mar 15, 2016 David rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
I read somewhere that Mario Vargas Llosa listed Alejo Carpentier as an important read in Latin American literature. His name surfaces amongst my GoodRead friends as well. They are certainly right after reading this powerful book.

"El reino de este mundo" (The Kingdom of this World) chronicles the Slave Rebellion in Haiti that ended in 1804. It led to the formation of a free state, Haiti, free from France and being led by non-whites. The story involved Pauline Bonaparte (Napoleon was her brother)
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Mark
Jan 18, 2012 Mark rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
In short, I thoroughly enjoyed Carpentier's "Kingdom of this World". His success in developing images is tantamount to his achievements in weaving the magical with the real. For me, these magical images were the driving force of the book in lieu of relatively untraditional and lacking narrative structure. As I mentioned, I believe the power of this book to be in the images, but an element unique to Carpentier I found was his ability to present a believable image without being longwinded. He is a ...more
Kahena Joubert

The Kingdom of This World by Alejo Carpentier is a novel filled with riveting images and metaphors relating to the Haitian liberation from France. The novel provides an interesting perspective on the Haitian Revolution as it accurately portrays history leaving out the boring dates and text that normally causes a reader to lose interest in a work. Here, Carpentier presents Haitian history though the life of Ti Noel, the one character present in all four parts of the book. Carpentier’s book is div
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Kassie Scott
Jan 25, 2015 Kassie Scott rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Recommended to Kassie by: Washington and Lee University
While the emotional detachment with which Carpentier presents the novel is necessary, it diminishes the impact just the same. I found myself longing to suffer with the protagonist, Ti Noël. Only after abandoning the didactic nature of intellectual fallacies was I able to appreciate Carpentier's "real maravilloso" style.

In failing to evoke deep sympathy for his characters, Carpentier succeeds. Not only does Carpentier respect his characters by refusing to present them as weak and conquered, he a
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Dusty
Mar 15, 2012 Dusty rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: read-in-2012
El reino de este mundo is peculiar for various reasons. Its brevity and attention to historical circumstances make it rather more an historical novella than a novel, for one. For another, it's a rare example of a work of Spanish American fiction that indexes for its inspiration the events of the revolutions of Haiti (against France) and Haitian slaves (against landowners). Even within the oeuvre of Alejo Carpentier, one of world literature's fundamental twentieth-century writers, arguably just a ...more
Sally
Jan 14, 2015 Sally rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Recommended to Sally by: Washington and Lee University LACS 256
Carpentier's The Kingdom of this World traces the history of the Hatian revolution and the construction of a new nation through the eyes of Ti Noel, a Hatian man who witnessed an experienced it all. By using Ti Noel as his style for portraying the Hatian revolution, Carpentier manages to bring warmth, culture, and personality into his version of this event in history. Carpentier manages to also incorporate nature as a major motif throughout this novel, in compliance with nature's central role in ...more
Austin Frank
Jan 26, 2015 Austin Frank rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Recommended to Austin by: Washington & Lee University
In his novel "The Kingdom of This World," Cuban novelist Alejo Carpentier paints beautiful images of colonial Haiti that are tinged with his signature use of magical realism and flowery language that makes him such a master of this style and a pioneer of one of Latin America's most signature genres. This novel delves into some of Latin America's most difficult social questions and explores some of the colonial history of Haiti. Carpentier's discussion of cultural diversity and the struggle for p ...more
Cindy
Jan 29, 2012 Cindy rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
The Kingdom of this World is a novel written by Nobel Prize Winner, Alejo Carpentier. Although this work of art is considered a fictional novel, it contains important historical elements. The book describes Haitians’ struggle for their independence before, during, and after the Haitian Revolution from the perspective of a slave- Ti Noel. By describing vivid imagines, incorporating excerpts in Creole language, and including real life people from Haitian history, Carpentier takes us through the ma ...more
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W&L LACS 256 2015: Discussion Topic: KINGDOM OF THIS WORLD 1 11 Jan 14, 2015 09:40AM  
  • Paradiso
  • Lands of Memory
  • I, the Supreme
  • Three Trapped Tigers
  • Men of Maize
  • La guaracha del Macho Camacho
  • El astillero
  • Singing from the Well
  • Sab
  • All Souls' Rising
  • The Death of Artemio Cruz
  • Headlong Hall
  • Who Slashed Celanire's Throat?
  • An Episode in the Life of a Landscape Painter
  • Huasipungo
  • Personality
  • A Short Account of the Destruction of the Indies
  • La Verdad Sospechosa
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Cuban novelist, essayist, and musicologist who greatly influenced Latin American literature during its "boom" period.

Perhaps Cuba's most important intellectual figure of the twentieth century, Alejo Carpentier (1904-1980) was a novelist, a classically trained pianist and musicologist, a producer of avant-garde radio programming, and an influential theorist of politics and literature. Best known f
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“Now he understood that a man never knows for whom he suffers and hopes. He suffers and hopes and toils for people he will never know, and who, in turn, will suffer and hope and toil for others who will not be happy either, for man always seeks a happiness far beyond that which is meted out to him. But man's greatness consists in the very fact of wanting to be better than he is. In laying duties upon himself. In the Kingdom of Heaven there is no grandeur to be won, inasmuch as there all is an established hierarchy, the unknown is revealed, existence is infinite, there is no possibility of sacrifice, all is rest and joy. For this reason, bowed down by suffering and duties, beautiful in the midst of his misery, capable of loving in the face of afflictions and trials, man finds his greatness, his fullest measure, only in the Kingdom of this World.” 21 likes
“In the Kingdom of Heaven, there is no grandeur to be won, inasmuch as there all is an established hierarchy, the unknown is revealed, existence is infinite, there is no possibility of sacrifice, all is rest and joy. For this reason, bowed down by suffering and duties, beautiful in the midst of his misery, capable of loving in the face of afflictions and trials, man finds his greatness, his fullest measure, only in The Kingdom of This World.” 9 likes
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