Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.
Start by marking “The Machine Crusade (Legends of Dune, #2)” as Want to Read:
The Machine Crusade (Legends of Dune, #2)
Enlarge cover
Rate this book
Clear rating
Open Preview

The Machine Crusade (Legends of Dune #2)

by
3.7 of 5 stars 3.70  ·  rating details  ·  9,331 ratings  ·  180 reviews
The breathtaking vision and incomparable storytelling of Brian Herbert and Kevin Anderson's Dune: The Butlerian Jihad, a prequel to Frank Herbert's classic Dune, propelled it to the ranks of speculative fiction's classics in its own right. Now, with all the color, scope, and fascination of the prior novel, comes Dune: The Machine Crusade.

More than two decades have passed s
...more
ebook, 624 pages
Published August 1st 2004 by Tor Books (first published September 16th 2002)
more details... edit details

Friend Reviews

To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

Reader Q&A

To ask other readers questions about The Machine Crusade, please sign up.

Be the first to ask a question about The Machine Crusade

This book is not yet featured on Listopia. Add this book to your favorite list »

Community Reviews

(showing 1-30 of 3,000)
filter  |  sort: default (?)  |  rating details
Markus
Buddy read with Athena!

"There are countless ways to die. The worst is to fade away without purpose."

After decades of standstill, the Butlerian Jihad is rising. The almost fanatical priestess Serena Butler and the power-hungry patriarch Iblis Ginjo have led it from an idea to a universe-spanning holy war. And in the spearhead of the movement stand the now legendary generals Vorian and Xavier, two brothers in arms whose surnames happen to be Atreides and Harkonnen.

A curious statement that pulled t
...more
Athena
Buddy Read with Markus!






ALL THE FEELS!!!!


Oh book...you ruin me!

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


EVERYONE YOU LOVE DIES!!!!!

Dufour
This book makes me want to scrub my brain with a brillo pad to get it out.

Having established that Herbert & Anderson are just PLOT VOMITTING things out by now instead of telling a good story, this volume of the Butlerian Jihad trilogy features all your favorite hints of amateur writing. We have random skips through time, checking in on characters whenever the authors get too lazy to finish their stories. We have random character deaths after pointless circumstances in which you've invested s
...more
Johnny
As much as I dislike “epic” fiction where the cast of characters is longer than the credited cameo appearances in “It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World,” I seem to keep coming back to the enthralled, mummified forms of Frank Herbert’s Dune as they are commanded by the necromantic chroniclers of the latest Dune novels (more accurately, prequels), Kevin J. Anderson and Brian Herbert. The experience isn’t the same, the ecological gospel not as clear and the novelty long since displaced, but there is som ...more
Delicious Strawberry
Out of all the McDune books that Brian and Kevin wrote, I found the Butlerian Jihad trilogy to be the most enjoyable out of them all. However, the same writing problems abound in all of the books, regardless of what it's about - useless detail, flat characters, and clunky writing in some places. This story would have been better if it was an entirely original creation by Brian and Kevin instead of a non-canon, fanfiction-esque extension of the Dune universe.

This book is heavy on filler. There ar
...more
Wilson
The book is not that good. I read it for the sake of understanding the events that happened before Dune.
I really had a hard time convincing myself that the political events in the book happened as they have without scrutiny from the society. Had these events happened in reality, a large deal of scrutiny would ensue. Another problem is that, the setting of the story is the universe so it is hard for me to fathom how events in the story had become critical points (How large was the Thinking Machi
...more
David Bonesteel
As the war between humans and thinking machines grinds on, both sides threaten to splinter under the weight of conflicting agendas. Meanwhile, on Arrakis, the outlaws who will one day be known as the Fremen begin to gather strength as the spice mélange grows in popularity throughout the human worlds.

This is a sprawling, messy novel that could easily have been shortened by more than a hundred pages by editing out the repetition, excessive narrative about minor characters, and many meandering para
...more
Patrick Hayes
I read this without reading the first book (Dune: The Butlerian Jihad) and had no problems getting into this book and its vast universe. I had thought the book would focus on the fight against that machines (as reading had always intrigued me since "hearing" about it in the original Dune), however with a cast of characters this large, the war can consume all of the book. I was a little mifted at this initially, but I soon found myself getting caught up in the spectacle and drama.

Some characters
...more
David B
As the war between humans and thinking machines grinds on, both sides threaten to splinter under the weight of conflicting agendas. Meanwhile, on Arrakis, the outlaws who will one day be known as the Fremen begin to gather strength as the spice mélange grows in popularity throughout the human worlds.

This is a sprawling, messy novel that could easily have been shortened by more than a hundred pages by editing out the repetition, excessive narrative about minor characters, and many meandering para
...more
David Dunnagan
Relentlessly insipid. The shambling horror of its plot is bound together only by the staggering stupidity of every single one of its characters. Immersion is impossible; suspension of disbelief wholly undeserved. I confess, this is the first book in a long while to defeat me. I did not finish it.

I try to keep my nostalgia glasses from becoming too rose-tinted: the Dune sequels penned by Herbert himself had many problems. But these novels are simply abysmal. The first editor to see them should ha
...more
Tien
I just couldn't do it. I enjoyed the Butlerian Jihad so naturally I wanted to read the sequel. I got about 1/6 of my way through the book before I just couldn't read another page. I kept thinking to myself, "maybe it'll get better. Just one more chapter." And the more I read, I realized I'd discovered the perfect replacement for sleeping pills. This book was so dry and dull and flat, with too much over-characterization and excessive exposition. I didn't know science fiction could be so dull it w ...more
Silvio Curtis
I honestly didn't expect the Dune prequels to be much good, but I figured I should still sample one to give them a chance. This one is part of a subseries fleshing out the details of the Butlerian Jihad, the episode of Dune series history when computers were destroyed, and hinting at the origins of a lot of other things too. It does have a complex plot (it isn't 700 pages long for nothing), and does try to keep the same themes as Frank Herbert's original books, but it's packed with cliches and i ...more
Nioosha
I've read this just for not losing the main plot of last dune books but remember:
books of "legends of dune" are ordinary books! (not like frank Herbert's works)
dark sides:
1-the story is told for lazy people with no imagination.
2-anyone can write books like these. (any serious sci-fi reader)
3-the characters are one-dimension. (except Vorian)
4-why these books are weaker than "Prelude to Dune"! they wrote them before this series.

bright sides:
1-you will have a background for main dune.(although not
...more
Graham Sneeringer
Amazing,amazing,amazing! The books just keep on getting better and better! Before I say anything else, you have to read The Butlerian Jihad by Brian Herbert before you read this, or you will not understand what is going on. Anyways, I found this book was very intense. I felt you really connect with the characters and their personalities, and overall you just get to know them better. The ending really surprised me, it was not what I expected at all. I found I could not put the book down, and I wa ...more
Jason Schneeberger
I enjoyed the first prequel book, The Butlerian Jihad, but I think I enjoyed this book just a little bit more. There are so many things that happen in this book that make it an EPIC extension of the Dune Universe. As the war between the sentient machines and humans rages on, there are severe implications and sacrifices that take place on both sides of the fence in this book. I really enjoyed the depth that we see in some of the characters in this story, that were introduced in the first prequel ...more
Scott Rhee
"The Machine Crusade", the second book in the Dune Butlerian Jihad series, plods along at a snail's pace in some parts. There are so many tangential stories, major and minor characters, that it seems like a sci-fi soap opera at times. Actually, with some of the most atrocious melodramatic dialogue I have read in years, this book really IS a sci-fi soap opera. I expected so much better from the writing team of Herbert and Anderson.
Dark-Draco
The second book in the trilogy starts a few decades after the events in the first, which, as a reader, made me feel a little hard done by - what else had been going on while I wasn't around? But in terms of the story, it didn't make a lot of difference. The free humans are still fighting the machines, while the Cymeks are also planning to revolt. Norma is working on her space folding ships and the rebels are still fighting the spice merchants of Arrakis. Erasmus makes another bet with Omnious an ...more
Fernando Játiva
A good continuation of the previous book. Still feel like reading and historical saga, a little to deep for some, but the revelations of how the fight against the machines got turned is pretty good. Also it shows the beginning of the space guild...
Jackie
Interesting depiction of religious mania used as a weapon. A theme seen throughout the Duniverse as well as Earth history.
Daniel Callister
Not as great as the first (which I gave 5 stars), but still a great read that any dune fan will enjoy. There did seem to be a lot of time wasted in trying to tie things into the original series, but at the same time, it was kind of cool to know how those things came to be. It just seemed like they could have told the same story in 60% of the length :). All in all, I really liked this book and am excited to see how the series ends with Battle For Corrin. (mostly I want to get through this series ...more
Joshua Hales
Today I finished "Dune: The Machine Crusade" by Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson. It was an excellent and adventurous chronicle to the Duniverse, drawing from the strong original story and characters of the Butlerian Jihad. I enjoyed the consistent discussion of humanity's diversity as its main strength in the face of automation. Here's a quote that resonated with me: "Important concepts must be absorbed in their totality. Do not attempt to interpret scriptures while wearing blinders in order ...more
Eric
After reading ‘The Butlerian Jihad’, I was skeptical of the ability of Brian Herbert and Keven Anderson to continue the work of Frank Herbert. The initial story was stilted and predictable. With ‘The Machine Crusade’ the writing duo have gotten their feet under them and taken more plot risks, including killing off pivotal characters. The Machine Crusade is a bridge in the trilogy and anyone expecting a neatly wrapped up story line (as the first book did) will have to take the next 600+ dive into ...more
John Shumway
*Same review for the Dune Universe*
GREAT books! VERY time consuming! Worth the time!

Ok here is the deal. If your not sure about starting a series this big, here is what I would do.
1. -- Read the 1st one by Frank Herbert "Dune" if you like it...

2. -- Read the "Legends Of Dune" series. Its 3 books written by Frank's son Brian and a author I really like by the name of Keven J. Anderson. Its a prequel that is so far in the past that it doesn't spoil the Original Dune series in any way, and you could
...more
Aishe
I picked this book up in an attempt to continue with the Dune series and found that it took me much longer to finish than previous books from Frank Herbert and even the Butlerian Jihad before this. I felt there was a lot of jumping around and really unnecessary background story arcs/-lines that were not necessary to build characters or move the plot along. However, once I slogged through this swamp of extraneousness, and got to the midpoint of the book, the action and pace really took off and th ...more
Chris Hirsch

How would you feel if you were being hunted down and slaughtered by machines? Killed or enslaved for your lack of efficiency. Only to know that we were the ones who created them. The Machine Crusade by Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson is a kind of science fiction book that shows what can happen when a race is faced with extinction, and the sacrifices that have to be made to keep it going.
Ominus, the evermind of the synchronized worlds wants to exterminate or enslave the entire human race, bu
...more
Andrew
This book was sadly awful. It takes what promise there was for the shaky first book and tosses it all out to create a mess of innuendos to today’s world. The Christian Jihad is the best for humanity. The Christian leaders are corrupt. Muslims are nothing more than slaves to the Christians. The Sunni ones are peaceful and non-violent, the Shia are violent and will fight back if pushed.

It’s like the author took the U.S. Governments stance on who they support in the Middle East and pasted it into t
...more
Jimmy
Jun 14, 2011 Jimmy rated it 4 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Dune Fans & Science Fiction Fans
Shelves: science-fiction
It does take some time for this book to get going and by the second half it becomes just as interesting a read as its predecessor. Don’t discourage and stick with it because it gets so much better and more is revealed about the Dune universe. ‘The Machine Crusade’ jumps ahead from the end of ‘The Butlerian Jihad’ to the years at the middle of the war against the thinking machines.
Erasmus struggles to maintain his individuality and places a bet with Omnius that’ll lead to the first Mentat. Omniu
...more
Jimmy
Jun 14, 2011 Jimmy rated it 4 of 5 stars
Recommends it for: Dune Fans & Science Fiction Fans
It does take some time for this book to get going and by the second half it becomes just as interesting a read as its predecessor. Don’t discourage and stick with it because it gets so much better and more is revealed about the Dune universe. ‘The Machine Crusade’ jumps ahead from the end of ‘The Butlerian Jihad’ to the years at the middle of the war against the thinking machines.
Erasmus struggles to maintain his individuality and places a bet with Omnius that’ll lead to the first Mentat. Omniu
...more
Jimmy
Jun 14, 2011 Jimmy rated it 4 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Dune Fans & Science Fiction Fans
It does take some time for this book to get going and by the second half it becomes just as interesting a read as its predecessor. Don’t discourage and stick with it because it gets so much better and more is revealed about the Dune universe. ‘The Machine Crusade’ jumps ahead from the end of ‘The Butlerian Jihad’ to the years at the middle of the war against the thinking machines.
Erasmus struggles to maintain his individuality and places a bet with Omnius that’ll lead to the first Mentat. Omniu
...more
« previous 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 99 100 next »
There are no discussion topics on this book yet. Be the first to start one »
  • The Road to Dune (Dune Universe)
  • Horizon Storms (The Saga of Seven Suns, #3)
  • The Dune Encyclopedia
  • The Battles of Dune
56
Brian Herbert, the son of famed science fiction author Frank Herbert, is the author of multiple New York Times bestsellers. He has won several literary honors and has been nominated for the highest awards in science fiction. In 2003, he published Dreamer of Dune, a moving biography of his father that was a Hugo Award finalist. His other acclaimed novels include Sidney's Comet, Sudanna Sudanna, The ...more
More about Brian Herbert...

Other Books in the Series

Legends of Dune (6 books)
  • Hunting Harkonnens (Legends of Dune, #0.5)
  • The Butlerian Jihad (Legends of Dune, #1)
  • Whipping Mek (Legends of Dune, #1.5)
  • The Faces of a Martyr (Legends of Dune, #2.5)
  • The Battle of Corrin (Legends of Dune, #3)
House Atreides (Prelude to Dune, #1) The Butlerian Jihad (Legends of Dune, #1) House Harkonnen (Prelude to Dune, #2) House Corrino (Prelude to Dune, #3) The Battle of Corrin (Legends of Dune, #3)

Share This Book

“Even victories take their toll on a man.” 3 likes
“The only guarantee in life is death, and the only guarantee in death is its shocking unpredictability.” 2 likes
More quotes…