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Tower of Glass
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Tower of Glass

3.68 of 5 stars 3.68  ·  rating details  ·  980 ratings  ·  43 reviews
The plot involves a 24th century entrepreneur-scientist, Simeon Krug, who's created service androids. Earth's wealthiest man, he is constructing of a glass tower in the Canadian tundra. The edifice is to communicate with a distant planetary nebula from which an indecipherable message has been received. He's also building a starship to be crewed by hibernating androids.
Tow
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Mass Market Paperback, #S6902, 184 pages
Published May 1971 by Bantam (first published 1970)
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(showing 1-30 of 1,661)
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Stephen
5.0 stars. This is an outstanding novel. Robert Silverberg writes serious, adult science fiction stories that usually address deep emotional and pschological issues. There are times that his books, while well-written, are a bit too dry to keep my attention throughout. That is DEFINITELY NOT THE CASE WITH THIS BOOK. I loved this story from the opening page all the way through.

Simoen Krug, billionaire industrialist of a future Earth, is a man obsessed with pushing mankind forward. Toward that end
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Sandy
Released in 1970, "Tower of Glass" was Robert Silverberg's 42nd sci-fi novel...his 18th since 1967 alone! The amazingly prolific author had embarked on a more mature phase of his writing career in '67, with an emphasis on ideas and a distinct literary quality, and "Tower of Glass" is yet another superior novel in this remarkable streak. Justifiably nominated for both the Hugo and Nebula awards (but "losing," respectively, to Ursula K. LeGuin's "The Left Hand of Darkness" and Larry Niven's "Ringw ...more
Kat  Hooper
ORIGINALLY POSTED AT Fantasy Literature.

"Some of them are looking for God, and some of them are looking for power, and some of them are just looking."

Simeon Krug, a brilliant inventor, has changed the world by creating synthetic humans in vats. They are so similar to humans that, to avoid confusion, Krug made their skin a reddish color and gave them no body hair. To these androids, Krug is God, but he doesn’t realize it. He thinks of them as mere machines and he’s set them the task of building a
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Leonardo
This is my second novel by Silverberg and it will most definitely not be the last. I cannot believe how a book this good can be so overlooked these days.

The Gollancz blurb is a good plot introduction:

"Simeon Krug is a man with a vision and he has the vast wealth necessary to bring it into being. For Krug wishes to communicate with the stars, to answer signals from deep space.

The colossal glass tower that he is building for the purpose soars high above the Arctic tundra, a sparkling monument to h
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Oscar
‘La torre de cristal’, escrita por Robert Silverberg en 1970, se ha convertido en todo un clásico con los años, y algunos de los temas que refleja todavía siguen estando de total vigencia en la ciencia ficción actual: religión, enfrentamiento entre humanidad y androides, el contacto con entidades extraterrestres, teleportación, la similitud entre entidad sintética inteligente y ser humano, etc.

La historia narra la empresa en la que se embarca el multimillonario Simeon Krug tras recibirse una señ
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Bookbrow
Actually 3.5 stars.

Robert Silverberg is one of my favourite writer's who often uses the genre of sci-fi to look at humanity within the context of a future world, this novel is no exception. Tower of Glass is from Silverberg's golden years where his writing was in top form. I loved the treatment of androids in this novel and their quest to be human. This book presents Silverberg's typical strength in story telling including the art of wrapping up a story to a satisfying conclusion. Unlike some of
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Ezgi
www.kitapezgisi.com

Fantastik kitap normalde sevmem. Hele ki distopya tarzı kitaplar genelde içimi bunaltır, okuyamam. Fuarda İthaki Yayınevi standındaki arkadaşların “bu kitap farklı ama” demeleri sonucunda aldım bu kitabı. Evet, gerçekten bu kitap farklı.

Normal distopya tarzı kitaplar gibi içinizi bunaltmıyor. Konuya kendinizi kaptırıyorsunuz, merak ediyorsunuz, o farklı dünya gözünüzde çok rahat bir şekilde canlanıyor.

23. Yüzyılda geçen bu kitap normal rahimden gelen insanların yanı sıra, o in
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David B
Simeon Krug, a fantastically wealthy entrepreneur, endeavors to communicate with the stars in this fascinating tale of a man's incredible hubris and the destruction it wreaks on all within his sphere of influence, which includes the entire world. Every one of Krug's actions appears to be motivated by the need for self-aggrandizement, although he would probably be shocked to hear it; this blindness is a fascinating aspect of the character. Krug wants to stretch his presence across this universe, ...more
Matt
What I liked:

This is a very well told story with some great character development. In fact, I would say that the strength of this novel lies in its characters as the plot really is pushed into the background for much of the novel. The two main protagonists, Simeon Krug and Thor Watchman, are so well drawn and remain true to their core beliefs even to the point of no return. Thor Watchman became one of my all-time favorite characters in a novel. It was fascinating to watch him grow as his princi
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Kate Thompson
Should androids have equal rights as the human who built them or stay as slaves who are considered property? In the future, there are three types in the world. Womb born, bottle born, and vat born. Soul swapping is all the rage, and while some androids pray to Krug (their builder and their god) there are other androids who dream of being free one day and have joined the AEP (Android Equality Party).

Written in 1970, this is the first book I have read by Robert Silverberg and the social commentar
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Amanda
The book presents a fascinating possible future that is marred by the rampant misuse of the term android and the length of time spent on the “android” religion.

I loved the idea of this book, and I love books about ai/androids/robots. I thus was horrified when within the first chapter we discover that the “androids” are, in fact, clones. They’re not machines at all. They are genetically engineered humans, created in vats, and whose genetic code is changed enough to give them plasticine skin so th
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David Bonesteel
Simeon Krug, a fantastically wealthy entrepreneur, endeavors to communicate with the stars in this fascinating tale of a man's incredible hubris and the destruction it wreaks on all within his sphere of influence, which includes the entire world. Every one of Krug's actions appears to be motivated by the need for self-aggrandizement, although he would probably be shocked to hear it; this blindness is a fascinating aspect of the character. Krug wants to stretch his presence across this universe, ...more
Roddy Williams
Simeon Krug is a man with a vision and he has the vast wealth necessary to bring it into being. For Krug wishes to communicate with the stars, to answer signals from deep space.

The colossal glass tower that he is building for the purpose soars high above the Arctic tundra, a sparkling monument to his determination and obsession. The androids who are working on it are perfect synthetic creatures, created by Krug’s own process in Krug’s own factories, and their commitment to the project and their
...more
Ana
Que fantástica surpresa! Não estava de todo à espera....um excelente livro! Muito bom. Gostei bastante. Julgo também que o facto de ter sido surpreendida, veio amplificar o efeito já positivo que este livro teve em mim.

Eu sei, eu sei, é um livro de ficção científica...Mas é um facto: este é um bom livro. E eu também não posso dizer que não gosto de ficção científica. Depende muito do livro. Há apenas uma coisa que me irrita sempre que acontece num livro deste género: são os nomes inventados da
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Josh
Dominated by one man’s obsession to talk to the stars, ‘The Tower of Glass’ encapsulates the essence of pure science fiction while paying homage to minority groups and their eventual uprise. In Krug, creator of a synthetic android race with a distinct humanoid likeness (excluding their hairless and rose tinted bodies), master builder, and budding astronomer, Silverberg has given life to a protagonist as much human as he his God. It is around Krug and his eccentric hobbies in which the plot focus ...more
kasia
Dec 30, 2013 kasia rated it 4 of 5 stars
Recommended to kasia by: Jake and Melanie
I don't read much sci-fi/fantasy, because I tend to find the extensive exposition somewhat tedious and the ideas vaguely juvenile. A totally unfair generalization, I'm sure, but there you have it. The Glass Tower, however, was highly recommended by two friends whose opinions I trust, and it isn't that long (sorry, Game of Thrones fans), so I gave it a whirl. And enjoyed it.

I will say up front that the book does suffer from the flaws of the typical sci-fi works. The writing is perfunctory, and y
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Simon
This is my third book by Robert Silverberg but my first disappointment. Not up to the high standard I was led to expect by the other two.

Amidst one man's obsession with making first contact with aliens, no matter what the expense, is a struggle by sentient androids for equality with humanity. For the "vat-born" to stand along side the "womb-born". But to their creator, who they see as their god, sees them only as things; as a means to achieving his ends.

Unconvincing character developments and mo
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Susan Chamberlain
I've forgotten what all the fuss was about.

Sometimes popular fiction stands the test of time and is as enjoyable 30 years later as it was the first time you read it. This novel did not. Maybe it's Silverberg's antiquated female characterizations, but I could not stomach this.
TrumanCoyote
Unfortunately a godawful lame ending pretty much sinks this one without a trace. It was churning along pretty well before that, even though the android religion didn't seem terribly credible. But the final bloodbath and chaos only served to underscore the inherent goofiness of the whole concept.
Nihan Sarı
bilimsel kurgudaki tutarlılık, kurgunun sağlamlığı, hayalgücü, karakterlerin canlılığı, okuyucuyu tatmin eden bir son.......çok severek okudum. İşini iyi bilen bir yazar Silverberg.
Eric
An industrialist obsessed with an extraterrestrial radio signal builds a colossal tower to send a response, using the artificial humans he has built as slave labor. Mostly a heavy-handed exploration of enslavement and it's effects on society.
Ignacio
Muy buena novela que deja demasiadas preguntas sin responder. Silverberg crea un futuro repleto de androides y plantéa un tema ético importante pero deja sin respuesta prácticamente todos los temas que abre como fondo de la trama. Krug y Vigilante son personajes completos y complejos, las tecnologías que presenta (transmat, etc...) son de las que excitan la imaginación del buen aficionado a la cientcia ficción, pero... ¿qué pasa con el resto? Da la impresión de que Silverberg haya concluído de m ...more
José Cascales vázquez
Como positivo, y a pesar de que la novela ya es un poco antigua (1970), toca temas muy actuales como la relación entre androides y hunanos y la religión. Como negativo, la pobre descripción de la tecnología y como muy negativo, el final apresurado. El desarrollo de la trama es correcto e interesante en gran parte de la obra, lástima que tenga más peso lo negativo
Larrydoege
I'm slowly making my way through Silverberg's immense back catalog, and this is my joint-favorite so far, the other being To Live Again. This is a future earth story that explores the multi-faceted and edgy relationship between human and android. The deliriously fascinating concept of a secret android religion that worships their indifferent and callous human creator is what made this book shine for me. There is genuine suspense too as you wonder if the physically stronger and mentally sharper a ...more
Richp
There is good reason why Silverberg's work of this period earned high praise, and this is one of his best.
Chris
Good, classic New Wave sci-fi. Silverberg takes relatively generic tropes of the genre (androids, instant matter-transfer, communicating to alien life) and uses them to explore the standard essential question of sci-fi: what does it mean to be human? Silverberg deftly keeps the story from just plodding along in mediocrity, however, but making all the characters -- android and human -- very real and very complex.
Brian Smith
Cool old school scifi novel that really gears up in the 2nd half. Part first contact story, part android civilization and with dashes of the mind of a megalomaniac.

Gets some points knocked off for casual sexism and rampant mentioning of "heaving breasts" and "erect nipples." I'm in full support for editing out all the boob talk that mar these scifi greats of old!
Ron Johnson
Hugo Nominee 1971
Chris
It's a Silverberg novel that if you squint your brain just right you can imagine as being written by Stanislaw Lem! How cool is that? The world-building is dodgy but by thinking of it as a bit of a Fable along the lines of "The Futurological Congress" I feel just justified in squeezing it up to five stars.
Erik Graff
Feb 21, 2012 Erik Graff rated it 4 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: sf fans
Recommended to Erik by: no one
Shelves: sf
Unlike far too many of the science fiction novels I read decades ago, this one I recall pretty clearly. Here the science is a background for the exposition of character, human and android, and an exploration of faith and belief.
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Robert Silverberg is one of science fiction’s most beloved writers, and the author of such contemporary classics as Dying Inside, Downward to the Earth and Lord Valentine’s Castle, as well as At Winter’s End, also available in a Bison Books edition. He is a past president of the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America and the winner of five Nebula Awards and five Hugo Awards. In 2004 the Sc ...more
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