Pocket Dictionary of Theological Terms
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Pocket Dictionary of Theological Terms

3.82 of 5 stars 3.82  ·  rating details  ·  82 ratings  ·  8 reviews
The Pocket Dictionary of Theological Terms is the perfect companion to your theological studies. Among its three hundred-plus definitions are English terms, from accommodation to wrath of God; foreign terms, from a posteriori to via media; theological movements and traditions; from the Alexandrian School to Wesleyanism; and theologians, from Anselm of Canterbury to Ulrich...more
Paperback, 122 pages
Published April 26th 1999 by IVP Academic (first published March 31st 1999)
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Daniel Bastian
Gatekeeping in Dictionary Form

A decent reference if you're looking for an alphabetized listing of common theological parlance. Not so good if you're looking for one not colored by denominational agenda. IVP’s Pocket Dictionary of Theological Terms is exactly as the title suggests, but unfortunately its use as an educational tool is compromised by a pervasive gatekeeping mentality that is so prevalent in evangelical circles.

And then I came across this nacre of doctrinaire clumsiness:

atheism. A sy...more
Michael
A helpful short reference booklet that is a great resource for novice and scholar alike. It is part of a series published by IVP Academic. After perusing it I decided to work on a similar idea: a "Pocket Dictionary of Ellen G. White" and came up with 350 entries based upon my work in the nine volumes of "Testimonies for the Church." My friend, Jud Lake, has agreed to co-author the volume and we hope to have it done later this year. Some times perusing books can lead to other great ideas: just li...more
Jason
May 28, 2009 Jason rated it 3 of 5 stars
Shelves: 2009
This is a great resource for anyone who wants to learn the basic terms for theological discussions.

Just a reference.

I had to basically read it from start to finish for my Christian Theology 2 class at Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary so let me warn you, it gets quite boring when you start to actually read it.

Why would they make us read it when it is a dictionary anyways?
Brett
This is a helpful little book to keep in your bag for those times when you hear a phrase, term, name, movement etc... that you may not have heard before or are not familiar with. It is by no means exaustive or very thorough, but it give you enough to grasp the idea and stay with the sermon, lecture, or even talkative friend.
Osvaldo
Nice little dictionary to read up on some common theological terms. Probably not meant to be read cover to cover as I did, but whether as a reference tool or a crash course in terms, it's an excellent dictionary for clarity and conciseness.
Eric
I read this. I forget what I thought about it because it was so long ago. It apparently didn't change my life. I hope that helps.
Susannah
This is an awesome reference. I've got extra copies if anyone wants one. It's small and super-handy.
Tyler
Handy little book, easy to understand definitions.
Jenn
Jenn marked it as to-read
Jul 13, 2014
Dr. Z
Dr. Z added it
Jul 09, 2014
Rebecca
Rebecca marked it as to-read
Jul 08, 2014
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101285
Stanley James Grenz was born in Alpena, Michigan on January 7, 1950. He was the youngest of three children born to Richard and Clara Grenz, a brother to Lyle and Jan. His dad was a Baptist pastor for 30 years before he passed away in 1971. Growing up as a “pastor’s kid” meant that he moved several times in his life, from Michigan, to South Dakota, North Dakota, Montana and Colorado.

After high scho...more
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