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The Tulip Virus

3.08 of 5 stars 3.08  ·  rating details  ·  290 ratings  ·  73 reviews
A gripping debut mystery set in contemporary London with roots in 17th century Holland and the mysterious tulip trade

In 1636 Alkmaar, Holland, Wouter Winckel's brutally slaughtered body is found in the barroom of his inn, an antireligious pamphlet stuffed in his mouth. Winckel was a respected tulip-trader and owned the most beautiful collection of tulips in the United Repu
ebook, 288 pages
Published April 27th 2010 by Minotaur Books (first published 2008)
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(showing 1-30 of 723)
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Absolutely fantastic! I hate to sound clichéd but I did not want to put this book down and whenever I had to I was always thinking about how to wangle my next reading opportunity. I was hooked right from the first page. The Tulip Virus begins with the murder of Wouter Winckel in Alkmaar, Holland in the year of 1636. Next we are confronted with the murder of Dutchman Frank Schoeller in London in the year 2007. With so much time between these murders you might think they couldn’t possibly be relat ...more
Nifty little book (short) with a parallel story - one set in Holland in the 17th century, the other in contemporary times. It's the story of what happened in Holland in 1636 when a greedy orphanage director, who had taken in the children of a dead man, manipulates a tulip bulb auction to bring in astronomical and unheard of prices so that his split of the proceeds is greatly enhanced. It also started the myth of the Semper Augustus tulip (you've seen pictures of this one before and if you've bee ...more
Alex is awaken to the sound of his phone ringing. It is his Uncle Frank. Alex rushes over to his home. There he finds Frank bleeding to death. Before Frank dies, he whispers something about a tulip and a book. Frank tells Alex not to let the police find the book. So what does a famous tulip known was the Semper Augustus have to do with Frank’s murder? That is the million dollar question.

The Tulip Virus is the debut novel by author, Danielle Hermans. I liked this book. The mixture of the past wi
Jul 05, 2015 Jaana rated it 3 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommended to Jaana by: Anne
Mielenkiintoinen dekkari, joka ei mielestäni "mässännyt" liikaa murhilla, vaan keskittyi enemmän siihen muuhun puoleen.
Hetkittäin ehkä aavistuksen pitkäveteinen luettava, mutta toisaalta kiinnostava, koska kertoi minulle ihan vieraasta asiasta, eli tulppaaneista. Lisäksi oli hauska, että kirja sijoittui enimmäkseen Hollantiin.
The historical basis of this book, the tulip bubble in 17th century Holland, was very interesting to learn about. The modern story line that's built around it is barely palpable. The themes of free will and science and religion ring true but the mystery the reader is presented with just doesn't hold the weight of these ideals. There are deaths which end up being resolved too quickly at the end and in an unbelievable manner. I do hope to find an interesting book that can shed more light on the hi ...more
Patricia Callegari
Backwards and forwards in time from the 1700's to the present, the mystery kept me involved. Who could have guessed that speculation in the tulip industry was at one time responsible for a complete downturn in the Dutch economy and lead to the making and breaking of great fortunes....shades of today!
I picked this because I thought it was non-fiction and wanted to learn more about Dutch tulip. That being said, I was happy that the author created an original plot rather than succumb to the DaVinci Code model. But I can't say that I ultimately liked the plot.
After book club tonight I went by TitleWave books and they did not have any copies of it. He also said it came out last year but he has never gotten a copy in the store.
Annika Hultén
Vilken smörja! Hade jag inte varit så nyfiken på fenomenet om varför tulpanerna blev investeringsobjekt och att Amsterdam är en favoritstad vet jag inte varför jag fortsatte att läsa. Har trots allt lärt mig om tulpanviruset som har stora likheter med både bostads- och it-bubblor. Priser trissas upp och luftaffärer belånas och poff spricker allt.
Deckarintrigen är slapp och överlastad med klichéer så även huvudpersonerna som naturligtvis har fashionabla lägenheter är vackra och framgångsrika, pr
Bethany Zimp
I loved the (true?) history behind this book, with the tulip trading/investing in the 1600s. I also liked the short chapters that bounced back and forth between different characters and even different centuries. The author took a very creative approach of sharing two different murders one from the seventeenth century and one modern day and lead the characters into discovering how they might be related. The actual writing of a convincing mystery and plot motive were sincerely lacking, but I gave ...more
I have been looking for a while for a really good history of the tulipmania phenomena in 17th Century Netherlands, because I find the psychology of speculative ventures a fascinating subject. I found The Tulip Virus at the library, and even though it was clearly a novel, I wanted to check it out for any information it could offer about that subject.

I rarely give up on a book after I’ve gotten as far as page 90, but I felt the Tulip Virus warranted an exception to this rule. I probably only last
Way back in the 1600s, in Holland, the humble tulip bulb took over the world. Generally considered the first speculative economic boom/bust event, tulip mania made many fortunes, and just as dramatically lost them again. The ironic thing about the passion for tulips, is that the most highly prized and sought after ones, with their beautiful colour combinations and markings, were actually as a result of a virus.

The author, who is Dutch herself, has taken tulip mania into the modern day. Her nove
Judy Desetti
Jul 21, 2012 Judy Desetti rated it 3 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: People who like historical fiction and mysteries
Recommended to Judy by: Book Club read for Sept 2012
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Jan 17, 2011 Elli rated it 5 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: History,action,drama fans
One of the things I look for in a book of this type is similar to a puzzle, finding the different levels of thought involved like a key to it's makeup. This book dealt with the corporate intrigue, but the "corporation" was the 17th century goldmine for the Netherlands that the tulip turned out to be. There was the white collar crime, and oh, was there crime...from inflating the so-called value of bulbs to way beyond what was real and causing a burst and consuming fortunes. And, of course, there ...more
Een jonge kunstenaar raakt betrokken bij de mysterieuze dood van zijn oom. Hij komt erachter dat de tulpenmanie niet iets is dat tot het verleden behoort. De gekte rond die bloem drijft mensen nog steeds tot het uiterste, zelfs tot moord…
Alkmaar, 1636. De gerespecteerde herbergier en tulpenhandelaar Wouter Winckel wordt gevonden in de gelagkamer van zijn taveerne De Oude Schuttersdoelen. Vermoord. Waarom moest hij dood?
Londen, 2007. Frank Schoeller wordt door zijn neef Alec dodelijk gewond aange
Absolutely fantastic! This reads a bit like a Dan Brown novel where you have to puzzle it out all along the way and I just loved that. I did not want to put this book down and whenever I had to I was always thinking about how to wangle my next reading opportunity. The Tulip Virus begins with the murder of Wouter Winckel in Alkmaar, Holland in the year of 1636. Next we are confronted with the murder of Dutchman Frank Schoeller in London in the year 2007. The connection between these two murders a ...more
From the very first page, Daniëlle Hermans has us intrigued. A murder in 1636 in an Alkmaar tavern, and another nearly 400 years later in an exclusive area of London: how are these related? What do the dying words of second victim mean? The two story lines develop independently, but are woven together beautifully. Daniëlle has obviously done quite a lot of research and we learn a great deal about tulip cultivation and trade, but in an easily digestible manner. She intertwines fact with fiction t ...more
I want to meet this writer's agent as the agent must be brilliant to get this one published and translated in a few languages. Definitely worth the 15% agent fee and probably more! If I ever write anything that I want published, I need to get this agent to do it.

I suspect this book grew out of a creative writing assignment to pick a complicated, historical, financial event then create a mystery story around it. At times I thought some things were lost in the Dutch to English translation, but abo
Kristina Chalmain
Upplägget är lovande: ett mord i ett tulpanhysteriskt 1600-tal i Nederländerna kopplas samman med ett mord i dagens London. Och berättelserna från 1600-talet är intressanta. Men boken är trist och förutsägbar, och dåligt strukturerad: först spridda ledtrådar, och plötsligt verkar författaren ledsna och en person får berätta hela bakgrunden i ett svep. Protagonisterna är skrattretande klichéartade. Tråkigt som sagt på ett bra upplägg!
I had just DNF'd a book that went nowhere with plot so this was a bit of a palate cleanser since it was almost all plot. There's still something about Scandinavian books that this one shares - the characters seem super quick to anger and then they calm down and apologize. There's also a formality to the language that lets me know I'm reading something translated from that part of the world.

But anyway, back to this book in particular. It was a very quick read, maybe a bit too quick. And you have
I would have given this 3.5 stars if I had the choice. I really liked learnign of the Tulip scandal and found it interesting that the most valuable tulips actually had a virus which made them so unique. The ending was a bit too much for me and it seemed like a lot to throw on to me near the end of the book. ... and the very last bit of the book, I went oh no ... I did not want that to happen ... I needed a happy ending.

I felt that the characters of Alec, Damien and Emma could have done with a b
Ugh. There was too much detail in the descriptions and the dialog was stilted. There was not enough detail in the characters and their connections. And the characters were shallow and unbelievable.

The switch between historical and current events was uneven and sometimes hard to follow. They weren't spaced right. And then at the end, you remembered, they were all for naught -- all of that historical stuff could have been done much more cleanly.

There was a clear humanist rant running throughout t
Justin Put
Ontzettend leuk en spannend boek. Geschreven in heden met teruggangen en de 17e eeuw, waar het allemaal is begonnen net de tulpengekte. Soort parodie op de beursschandalen van nu.
It reads a bit like a more literary Dan Brown book. (which I do not mean as a slight to Dan Brown, I enjoy his books for what they are) I certainly found the historical events that were wrapped up in a murder mystery involving the Tulip commodities market of 17th century Holland fascinating. I read it in a day, because that's the thing about a good murder mystery, you want to figure it all out. My only complaint is the author put a lot of time into the relationship of the central characters at t ...more
mwah, het leest op zich vrij vlot weg, maar het is ook geen hoogvlieger wat mij betreft.

Wel weer wat bijgeleerd over de tulpen ;)

Leuk dat het terugspringt naar het heden en verleden (17e eeuw).
Najciekawszą częścią tej książki jest okładka.
NL - Het tulpenvirus
What was this book about again?

It's been too long.

Basically, I have a thing with tulips. I'm not sure if I said this before, but I do. It's fucking weird, but I love flowers--especially tulips.

And history.

I love history.

So if you mix history and tulips, you get a very excited Azula.

But this story was boring. And uninteresting. It was bad writing (maybe some words were lost in translation. but sucks for Hermans, doesn't it) and had bad pacing.

Kalendra Dee
What does the 17th century Dutch tulip speculation craze have to do with a murder in 21st century London? This is the enigma that confronts Alec Schoeller as he investigates the murder of his uncle Frank. The killing seems to tie into another murder that happened long ago in Holland. In 1632 innkeeper and tulip speculator Wouter Winckel was brutally murdered. His assailant was never found. Now, the past comes back to haunt Alec as more people around him begin to die.
I'm wavering between a 3 and a half and a four. I was happy with the fast pace of this book and the fact that the author didn't spend inordinate time describing the things she'd learned through her research to write this book. If I want to know more about Holland's tulip history I can look more up. In the meantime, I thought the story was entertaining and a nice length (can you tell I think that another, more typical, author would have made this a much longer book?!).
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Daniëlle Hermans (1963) debuteerde in 2008 met Het tulpenvirus, dat inmiddels in elf landen is verschenen waaronder de USA, Australië, Italië en Duitsland. Ook de filmrechten zijn verkocht. Daarna volgden De watermeesters en De man van Manhattan. 2013 is het jubileumjaar van de Vrede van Utrecht die in 1713 werd gesloten. Ter gelegenheid daarvan schreef zij In vredesnaam. Momenteel werkt ze aan ee ...more
More about Daniëlle Hermans...
Stil in mij: overleven bij de nonnen In vredesnaam De man van manhattan De watermeesters Stille getuigen

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