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The Lost Thing

4.33  ·  Rating Details  ·  3,258 Ratings  ·  241 Reviews
Based on the Oscar award-winning short film, this book asks important questions: What does it mean to see things differently? What is important to notice?
Paperback, 32 pages
Published April 8th 2010 (first published 2000)
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بثينة العيسى
كتاب عميق، مؤثر، ويأخذك إلى نقطة بعيدة في داخلك، لكي تفهم نفسك والعالم أكثر. شون تان فيلسوف فذ وكاتب مبدع وفنان عبقري.. كتبه تقرأ أكثر من مرة، خاصة في مواسم الحزن والغربة.
Lisa Vegan
Well, I’ve loved the other books I’ve read by this author-illustrator, and he recently won an Oscar for a film adaptation of this book (an Academy Award winning animation short I’ve not seen, yet) so I was sufficiently curious to get and read a copy of the book. And, yes, I want to see the film; I can see it being an excellent short.

It’s probably not fair that I compare all Tan’s books with the brilliant The Arrival or even The Red Tree; those books are so amazing. This one is terrific too. Mela
...more
Maharetr
Nov 15, 2008 Maharetr rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: everyone
I read this straight through in the Oxford Street Bookshop (took less than five minutes), and only did the 'you're not crying in the shop!' thing once, which is good going for a Shaun Tan.

Then I went and bought it, and spent a total of an hour pouring over all the hundreds of tiny details on the train. So beautiful, and utterly wrenching.

He writes of kids' magic: all the things you see before the grown up world trains you out of seeing what's really there.
Rebecca
Oct 22, 2007 Rebecca rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: 3rd grade and up
I'm only giving it 4 stars because it wasn't *quite* as magical as The Red Tree. The main character finds a Lost Thing on the beach. It's huge and red and looks kind of like a giant coffee pot with tentacle-y feet. No one wants it; where does it belong? And who is responsible now that it has been Found?

This is another engrossing picture book for older readers, with endless details to be appreciated in the collage illustrations, from bits of text ("No office desk is complete without a good spool
...more
Lindsey
I loved this book. The illustrations are a weird combination of dark/depressing and funny/ironic. It is a dark, mechanical world. Very dystopian, but the characters do normal and very dorky things that make it funny. The text by itself would seem ordinary, which is part of the magic of this book, because it fools the reader into thinking they will see something familiar in the illustration. Of course there is nothing boring or cliche about the illustrations. In fact, it is completely unpredictab ...more
Anne Hamilton
The unusual alien-looking 'lost thing' is not exactly invisible. But it's easily overlooked, easily ignored, easily passed by without noticing either its existence or its strangeness. Like a giant red pot with a spout, a metal hook, octopus feet and bell-tagged wings, it sat on the beach until a boy noticed it one day. Ever helpful, the boy tries to assist the 'lost thing', eventually taking it to the Federal Department of Odds & Ends.

Once there, a strange cleaner hands the boy a card and s
...more
Jacqueline
"Some things are like that, he said,
they are just plain lost."


Свива сърцето и го усмихва едновременно.
И разкошни илюстрации.

I still think about that lost thing from time to time.
Specially when I see something out of the corner of my eye which doesn’t quite fit.
You know, something with a weird, sad sort of look.
I see that kind of thing less and less these days.
Maybe there aren’t many lost things around any more.
Or maybe...
Or maybe I just stopped noticing.
Too busy doing other stuff I guess...


notgettingenough

Wherein Shaun Tan ruins my theories about hard cover vs soft....

http://alittleteaalittlechat.wordpres...
Nadia Begum

Initially at first glance the story book was complexed to unfold as far as the illustrations were concerned. After analysing the picture book and reading the background information provided, we drew out key themes that became prominent. One of the themes that became more obvious was industrialism; this was portrayed clearly by the dulled, grey colours representing the lack of imagination. There was also an element of repetition and commonality within the pictures, these showed the habitual struc
...more
Annabel Hall
Nov 24, 2015 Annabel Hall rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Title and brief summary: The Lost Thing by Shaun Tan, this book is based around the idea of curiosity and how it decreases with age. It explores the ideas industrialisation without directly mentioning it.

The implied reader: The reader needs to have some awareness of how the world is changing due to industrialisation and how it could effect the community and daily life.

Themes: Creativity, loss, lost, belonging, outside the norm, apathy, imagination, suppression of imagination, distraction, pragm
...more
Rebecca Collins
Title and brief summary: The Lost Thing by Shaun Tan, this book is based around the idea of curiosity and how it decreases with age. It explores the ideas industrialisation without directly mentioning it.

The implied reader: The reader needs to have some awareness of how the world is changing due to industrialisation and how it could effect the community and daily life.

Themes: Creativity, loss, lost, belonging, outside the norm, apathy, imagination, suppression of imagination, distraction, pragm
...more
Daithi O'connor
The lost thing is a picture book. It tells the story of a alien/machine like creature that the writer finds on the beach. The writer doesn't know what it is and where it has come from. He decided to take it home and because he feels that it is lost. He brings it to a lost and found but a man there tells him not to leave it here as this is the place where things are forgotten about. He gives the writer another address and the writer and the lost thing go to this place. The story deals with themes ...more
Allison Cole
Nov 24, 2015 Allison Cole rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Set in the future, this story seems to be about the huge importance of creativity. A boy finds a 'lost thing' that no one else notices and no one else cares about - in a world that seems very bland and boring.

Understanding the meaning of this book was quite challenging to me. From what I've gathered the main themes are the world is a machine where things belong (or it's certainly is becoming that way), children can lose their creativity over time and social awareness - the idea that many people
...more
Eduardo Ventura
Oct 07, 2015 Eduardo Ventura rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: 7 to 10 years old
PERSONAL RESPONSE
I like this book very much because of the magic that it has. I also loved the illustrations that I believe were made by the author (Shaun Tan).

PLOT
The Lost Thing is a story about Shaun, a young guy that likes to collect bottle tops. One day Shaun was walking by the beach looking for bottle tops for his bottle tops collection when he saw a strange creature. The creature looked like a mix of a big red boiler with crab claws and tentacles. It seemed like everyone was too busy to pa
...more
Erin
Awards: Children's Book Council of Australia Award Nominee for Picture Book of the Year - Honour Book (2001), Aurealis Award for Convenor's Award for Excellence (2000)
Grades: 2-8

A boy out collecting bottle tops notices something strange and lost looking on the beach. He decides to take it home after deciding that it is a "lost thing." Most people don't even notice it until he points it out. His parents don't want him to keep it, so the following day he goes out to find a place for the lost thing
...more
Michelle Gibson
Title and brief summary:
This book is based around the idea of curiosity and how it decreases with age. It explores the ideas industrialisation without directly mentioning it.

The implied reader:
The reader needs to have some awareness of how the world is changing due to industrialisation and how it could effect the community and daily life.

Themes:
Creativity, loss, lost, belonging, outside the norm, apathy, imagination, suppression of imagination, distraction, pragmatism, bureaucracy, society, con
...more
Dani Hickling
This book focuses on the importance of imagination and creativity. I believe that the author wants to impact the readers view of the world around us.
In my view the themes in the book are creativity and social awareness as it encourages you to open your eyes to what is going on around you. The picture book techniques used are the background illustrated with maths symbols. This suggests that everything has a correct answer and lacks creativity. The pictures chosen are various machines indicating
...more
Adri
Oct 26, 2007 Adri rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
he sounds so Singaporean. KUDOS for a Chinese in Oz! Beautifully illustrated, this book is wonderful.

A short history from www.shauntan.net:
Shaun Tan was born in 1974 and grew up in the northern suburbs of Perth, Western Australia. In school he became known as the “good drawer” which partly compensated for always being the shortest kid in every class. He graduated from the University of WA in 1995 with joint honours in Fine Arts and English Literature, and currently works full time as a freelance
...more
Chris Miller
Set in a whimsical, steampunky world where bureaucracy/industrialization walks hand-in-hand with the absurd (reminds me of the movie, "Brazil"). A boy helps a misfit creature find a place where misfits go. Interesting social commentary about how as we age we get absorbed into ourselves and stop noticing the world around us (and each other)--which is a theme in Shaun Tan's stories, and probably why he fights to keep our imaginations alive and our minds awake with his fantastical worlds.
Joshua Denton
I feel this book could really help children with writing description in their own stories. A really nice story about accepting and helping people and their diffferences. kind of like a sweeter version of Armin Greder's The Island.
















Annie
Apr 25, 2008 Annie rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: children-s-books
One day a boy, our narrator, finds a thing that has “a sad, lost sort of look.” The boy attempts to take the thing home, but his mom and dad won’t let him keep it. He finds an ad in the paper for the “Federal Department of Odds and Ends” and embarks on a journey to find the thing a place where it can belong. The pages of this book have a blue-print background and college-style color images, with text passages in hand-writing on notebook paper that appear to be pasted in with the pictures. The im ...more
Elizabeth A
Apr 07, 2016 Elizabeth A rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: graphix, art, 2016
This picture book has gorgeous art - but then I would expect nothing less from the author. The story however was not as engaging as his other work. Still, I'd get a library copy just so you can ogle the artwork.
Virginia
It's hard to rate a children's book. It's not as if there are a lot of pages or complicated plots. I got this book from the library because Shaun Tan recently won an Oscar and has been nominated and extolled for his art for many books. The art is interesting and beautiful but the story is just so-so.

However, if the rating were based on my son's complete fascination with the pictures and his joy at having a "big boy" book, then perhaps the rating would be five stars. He flips the pages over and
...more
Anthony Eaton
Jan 10, 2011 Anthony Eaton rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
The humor in this book - both written and visual - make it arguably my favourite picture book of all time. The fact that the much of the art (including the cover) playfully references some of my favourite artists doesn't hurt, either.

I'm adding to this review to mention that the animated short film of 'The Lost Thing' - many years in the making - has just this year (2011) made the shortlist for the academy awards. And so it should. The story's comments on isolation, community, society and connec
...more
Eric Freh
Apr 28, 2015 Eric Freh rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
"Today is the tomorrow you were promised yesterday"

Short simple and awesome. Read the book, watch the film, read the book again
Rabia Butt
Nov 24, 2015 Rabia Butt rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Title and brief summary: The Lost Thing by Shaun Tan, this book is based around the idea of curiosity and how it decreases with age. It explores the ideas industrialisation without directly mentioning it.

The implied reader: The reader needs to have some awareness of how the world is changing due to industrialisation and how it could effect the community and daily life.

Themes: Creativity, loss, lost, belonging, outside the norm, apathy, imagination, suppression of imagination, distraction, pragm
...more
Revista Fábulas
por Ana Ramalhete

A máquina e as fábulas futuristas

Desde o século XIX, com a revolução industrial, a ciência e o progresso não pararam de evoluir e com elas as máquinas ganharam capacidades cada vez maiores e mais sofisticadas. Em oposição ao herói inicial, que nascia no seio de uma família ilustre, filho de um rei ou de um deus, num ambiente obscuro ou de grande dificuldade, neste século surge um herói que é, essencialmente, fruto do génio científico.

A literatura foi acompanhando esse desenvolvi
...more
Julia
Nov 18, 2014 Julia rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
In this book, a man stumbles across a "Lost Thing". After discovering that the thing doesn't have a home and is truly lost, he talks to his friend to try to find out what the Thing is. He takes it in to his home and the adventure between the two begins. He tries to bring the lost thing to where lost things go, but is warned against it. They then follow the arrow to the "right place" and they find a place with all the other saved lost items.
I absolutely adore this book! I had actually come acros
...more
Clare Cannon
Feb 22, 2011 Clare Cannon rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: 4-10 years (boys)
Shelves: 04-8yrs
This book brings a few words to mind: bizarre, absurd, funny, odd, quirky, cool, a picture book that adults would appreciate and little boys could get lost in for hours. There's no point to the story - the author is very clear about that - but sometimes an intricately illustrated book about nonsense is just what you need. And children do have a tendency to collect random bits of something that they must painstakingly find a home.
Tamara
Oct 31, 2007 Tamara rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: picture-books
Thanks for the recommend, Becky!

What great illustrations! A unique perspective, wonderfully charming nonchalance from the narrator, and an overall sense of adventure and mystery.

I would definitely pair this with one of my other favorite picture books: The Tin Forest by Helen Ward. Both have fairy tale-esque illustrations and an underlying theme of things that need to find a new usefulness.
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Shaun Tan (born 1974) is the illustrator and author of award-winning children's books. After freelancing for some years from a studio at Mt. Lawley, Tan relocated to Melbourne, Victoria in 2007. Tan was the Illustrator in Residence at the University of Melbourne's Department of Language Literacy and Arts Education for two weeks through an annual Fellowship offered by the May Gibbs Children’s Liter ...more
More about Shaun Tan...

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“Today is the tomorrow you were promised yesterday.” 25 likes
“So you want to hear a story? Well, I used to know a whole lot of pretty interesting ones. Some of them so funny you'd laugh yourself unconscious, others so terrible you'd never want to repeat them. But I can't remember any of those. So I'll just tell you about the time I found that lost thing....” 24 likes
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