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Das Leben, das Universum und der ganze Rest (Per Anhalter durch die Galaxis, #3)
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Das Leben, das Universum und der ganze Rest (Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy #3)

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4.19  ·  Rating Details ·  141,111 Ratings  ·  2,286 Reviews
Nachdem er durch alle möglichen und unmöglichen Gegenden der Galaxis gekommen war, wo man ihn stets nur beschimpft und beleidigt hatte, war Arthur Dent nun endlich wieder zur Erde zurückgekehrt. Leider einer prähistorischen. Er erwachte in einer eiskalten Höhle, ausgerechnet in Islington, und der nächste Bus ging in zwei Millionen Jahren. Abwechslung in seinen eintönigen A ...more
Paperback, 222 pages
Published 1999 by Heyne (first published 1982)
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Rick First of all; this is the third of five books in the Hitchhiker's Trilogy. Read it third, not first. If you'd read the the first two you'd know the…moreFirst of all; this is the third of five books in the Hitchhiker's Trilogy. Read it third, not first. If you'd read the the first two you'd know the answer to your question.

There is no plot. Anything in any of these books that in anyway resembles a "plot" was put there by Adams just to through you off the scent. Don't expect a plot, don't look for a plot; just read and enjoy. (less)

Community Reviews

(showing 1-30)
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Petra Eggs
I've just read the most extraordinary thing. In the US version of the third novel of The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, Life, the Universe and Everything, the word 'Belgium' is used to replace the word "fuck" which was in the British publication.

Apparently Douglas Adams' American publishers thought that some of the language in the book was too crude for Americans and asked him to take out the words 'fuck', 'asshole' and 'shit'. Adams' replaced asshole with kneebiter, shit with swut and fuck w
...more
Algernon
Apr 06, 2016 Algernon rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: 2016

Another world, another day, another dawn.
The early morning’s thinnest sliver of light appeared silently. Several billion trillion tons of superhot exploding hydrogen nuclei rose slowly above the horizon and managed to look small, cold and slightly damp.
There is a moment in every dawn when light floats, there is the possibility of magic. Creation holds its breath.


... and then a voice from above utters the words:

“You’re a jerk, Dent!”

Arthur Dent has every reason to be both puzzled and angry at
...more
Henry Avila
Arthur Dent finds himself living alone, on prehistoric Earth, in a cold, damp cave. His friend Ford Prefect, bored, has wandered off, early on , without saying a word , to Africa, Arthur learns, later. The duo, time traveled here, not voluntarily, and have tried to adjust. The whole gang, has been scattered all through the Galaxy. Marvin, the depressed robot, has conversations with a talking mattress, in a strange planet, Trillian, is at a party, that never ends, and Zaphod Beeblebrox, is sulkin ...more
Barry Pierce
I'm getting very bored of this series. While I like the characters and I understand the humour, I'm not laughing. I read these novels with a smile, not a smirk.
Riku Sayuj
Jun 18, 2012 Riku Sayuj rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition

42? Really? I don't think so!


42 is the answer! NO! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate!Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate! Chocolate!

Manny
People may have noticed that I've recently become very interested in theories of physics which involve multiple universes. I've spent a fair amount of time over the last few weeks reading about them and discussing the ideas.

Since it's buried in one of my other reviews, let me present my conclusions explicitly. To my surprise, I discover that there is a great deal of evidence to support the claim that we are only one of many universes, and, moreover, that we know what these other universes are. T
...more
Ben
Apr 12, 2009 Ben rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: True fans of the series
Shelves: mooched
A series losing steam, and it's a real shame given the potential of the first two books--both fun, quick reads. This title is less focused on the sci-fi and philosophical underpinnings of the first two books. Instead, Adams here maintains sequences that hinge on bizarre chains of events and silly, ponderous exchanges between characters who have less and less of an idea as to what exactly is happening around them. These felt a long 200+ pages indeed.

The bon mots and clever passages are fewer and
...more
Brandon Collinsworth
this is the last book in the series that I really enjoyed and I almost wish Douglas Adams would have called it quits here. The book gives us the chance to laugh at ourselves in going back to prehistoric earth and Adams alternate view of how we ended up the creatures we are, that was extremely clever.

But Krikkit was the best part, this story was amazing and I can't help but wonder if Adams religous views are at work here. A group of people that just can't accept the idea that there might be anoth
...more
Jonathan

As a continuation of Douglas Adams' famous The Hitchiker's Guide Series this was, as indicated by the foreword, one of the most plotted in the series. But as also indicated by the foreword, you don't read The Hitchiker's Guide Series for the plots. So, you ask me, what do you read it for? You read it for the sense of wonder about the crazy place the universe is. You read it for the comedy of Douglas Adams, for his creative and zany use of made up people, places, words...for his use of language.
...more
Ferdy
As fun and silly as the previous instalments. The best part was that random guy going around insulting everyone.
Olga
Maybe 2.5 stars. Half the time I didn't understand what the hell was happening. These books are usually a little crazy and over the top, but this one was specially weird.
I'm giving it a 3 star rating, because of the audiobook. Martin Freeman's narration made this really enjoyable and I laughed out loud a lot of times. Arthur is still an amazing character, not much change about the way he's written but still my favorite.
Katie
Jan 02, 2014 Katie rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: sci-fi, fiction, comedy
I appreciate Douglas Adams a bit more each time that I read him. This was unsurprisingly lovely and funny and very enjoyable. It's a wonderful thing to read if you're having a bad day and it's rainy outside (or hey, even if it's sunny).

I don't think I really noticed it before, but reading through this I kept finding myself thinking that Douglas Adams could easily have been a very successful "serious" writer too, if he had wanted to be one. He's a wonderful writer, and there are a couple of turn
...more
Joe
Aug 18, 2014 Joe rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
'From the studios on the unstable fourth moon of Vega four; it's The Ua show!' The announcer shouted as Ua emerged from behind the curtain to the applause of her live audience.

'Thank you, thank you.' She called to her adoring fans. 'And I must say I love you all. Even the reptiloids. Oh what am I saying; especially the reptiloids.' Light laughter followed.

'Today we have with us the stars of Life, the Universe and Everything.' She called out while making a horizontal slash through the air; a pant
...more
Cecily
Hitchhiker's, volume 3.

Mostly about Krikkit - and the Bistromathic Drive, which is better than mere Infinite Improbability.

The immortal Wowbanger the Infinitely Prolonged gave himself the task of insulting everyone in the universe - individually (but nearly did Arthur twice).

It has the usual wonderful Adamsness:

The "knack" of learning to fly is to "throw yourself at the ground and miss".

"Aggressively uninterested".

"One thing has suddenly ceased to lead to another".

Slartibartfast, who has on
...more
David Sarkies
Oct 25, 2016 David Sarkies rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: sci-fi
It's all just a game of cricket
25 October 2016 - Clifton Hill

I'm going to have to be honest here and admit that I really wasn't all that impressed with this book. In fact the story was originally meant to be a six part Doctor Who series which was rejected by the producers, and I can see why – it just really didn't seem to be what I would expect from Doctor Who. Okay, the Doctor can be pretty tongue in cheek at times, and while there are suggestions that some Earth practices have extra-terrestri
...more
Gauri
Apr 10, 2017 Gauri rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
My rating simply reflects my enjoyment of the novel.

I get the humor, but I didn't laugh. There were several clever little plot sequences and lines, but nothing much more than that, it seems. The first book presented some great ideas. The second book presented, more or less, two good ideas. The third book... I couldn't find anything worthwhile. Please do comment below if you noticed something I didn't, because I really don't want to set down this book without gaining anything from it.
Evan Leach
The third entry in the Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy series probably has the most coherent plot of all five books, for what that’s worth. In Life, the Universe and Everything, Arthur, Ford and friends get roped into preventing the destruction of the universe. A group of sinister robots have been appearing around the galaxy collecting specific items, and if their efforts are successful all creation as we know it will be destroyed. Unlike the other books in the series, where the characters ofte ...more
Jim
Nov 30, 2014 Jim rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
I'm not sure there has ever been a point to any of this, but this one seemed to lose any sign of cohesive narration toward the end. Again, it ended abruptly & on a cliff hanger. Still kind of funny at odd moments, but so pointless as to be tiring. I thought I'd try one more & queued it up, but then found some better books at the library. I think I've spent enough time on this series. I now get many of the references FWIW. Ugh. Next I'll be watching football or some other ridiculous sport ...more
Becky
Sep 15, 2011 Becky rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Still funny, still absurd, still pretty deep really, but Adams was definitly starting to lose some of the threads here. This is the first one where I found myself asking, "wait, what?". There are some pretty decent time jumps between chapters that will leave eyebrows waggling in confusion. But, there ARE still some really great pieces, I'm particularly fond of bistro math.
FlibBityFLooB
How can you go wrong with the zany mind of author Douglas Adams? Arthur, living alone on prehistoric Earth, decides happily to himself that he will go mad and announces it to the empty world. Ford, who unexpectedly reappears after being gone for four years, tells Arthur that he went mad for a while and it did him a lot of good. I loved Ford’s description of his bout of self-imposed madness: “And then I decided I was a lemon for a couple of weeks. I kept myself amused all that time jumping in an ...more
Peter
Strained but enjoyable sequel: With the publication of The Restaurant at the End of the Universe Douglas Adams had completed his novelisations of the two Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy radio series, and the story had effectively reached it's natural conclusion, with the wrapping up of all the major plot-threads concerning the quest for the Ultimate Question, the destruction of planet Earth, and Zaphod's theft of the Heart of Gold. The series popularity though resulted in Adams bringing out a th ...more
Eric Allen
Apr 18, 2015 Eric Allen rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
This is the first book in the series that has an actual storyline, where there's an ancient evil that needs to be, and is eventually, dealt with in the end. The really amazing thing is that this series went two entire books before it even really needed to happen, and no one really seems to care, because the first two books are so entertaining without any real plotline tying all of the random events together in them. I mean, for a book that doesn't have a girl who discovered a way that everyone c ...more
Yvonne Mendez
Feb 21, 2013 Yvonne Mendez rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
The first book made sense and I met my new love: Marvin the Paranoid Android. The second book "The restaurant at the end of the universe", made sense, sorta, kinda, but I can't explain why it made sense. Marvin was depressingly charming and I even had a small bout of depression in his honor. In this third installment, there is less of Marvin and more saving-the-universe type action. I constantly feel like Arthur Dent with all these things and new concepts being thrown at me from the lips of the ...more
Najaf Naqvi
May 20, 2017 Najaf Naqvi rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: books-read
He wrote a book about the fate of the 'verse and cricket. Bleedin' cricket!
J.G. Keely
The universe is a joke.

Even before I was shown the meaning of life in a dream at 17 (then promptly forgot it because I thought I smelled pancakes), I knew this to be true--and yet, I have always felt a need to search for the truth, that nebulous, ill-treated creature. Adams has always been, to me, to be a welcome companion in that journey.

Between the search for meaning and the recognition that it's all a joke in poor taste lies Douglas Adams, and, luckily for us, he doesn't seem to mind if you
...more
Debbie
Dec 07, 2016 Debbie rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
Life, the Universe and Everything was everywhere. All over life. All over the universe. And all over my span of consciousness. My poor little Earth brain was inadequate for this book! *Spontaneously laughs like a mad hatter and then abruptly stops.* I wasn't over the moon for this one. I've read some reviews about the previous two books in the series, The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy and The Restaurant at the End of the Universe and some readers said they were weird. I didn't find them we ...more
Ivonne Rovira
No doubt about it: Douglas Adams' The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy and its sequel The Restaurant at the End of the Universe were five-star novels. Anyone would want to read these laugh-out-loud funny books you'd again and again. But the third book in Adams' series, while amusing, doesn't prove to be as good.

Sure, there are some funny scenes, such as when Arthur Dent braves killer robots to return to Lord's Cricket Ground to deposit ashes. (Any more details on that would spoil the novel.) Li
...more
Momina Masood
"Important facts from Galactic history, number two:

(Reproduced from the Siderial Daily Mentioner's Book of popular Galactic History.)

Since this Galaxy began, vast civilizations have risen and fallen, risen and fallen, risen and fallen so often that it's quite tempting to think that life in the Galaxy must be

(a) something akin to seasick – space-sick, time sick, history sick or some such thing, and

(b) stupid."



Ah, well. Much, much better than The Restaurant. Hilarious as expected. Arthur got more
...more
Simona Bartolotta
- Noi non siamo ossessionati da nessuna mania, capite - continuò Ford.
- ...
- Ed è proprio questo il fattore decisivo: l'ossessione. Non potremo mai vincere contro dei maniaci. Loro hanno la fissazione da soddisfare, noi no. E' quindi destino che vincano loro.
- Anch'io ho le mie fissazioni, i miei interessi – disse Slartibartfast con la voce che gli tremava in parte per il risentimento, in parte anche per il dubbio.
- Ah si? Quali?
- Bé – disse il vecchio - m'interessa la vita, m'interessa l'U
...more
Luise
Dec 05, 2016 Luise rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
New part of this series, a new exciting adventure.

This time, Arthur Dent and his friends have to prevent the destruction of the universe. Will they succeed?!?

It's just as fun to read as the other parts, there really isn't much more to say about it.

Now excuse me, I'm off trying to throw myself at the ground and miss - i. e. fly away into whatever adventure my next choice of reading may bring me.
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Douglas Noël Adams was an English author, comic radio dramatist, and musician. He is best known as the author of the Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy series. Hitchhiker's began on radio, and developed into a "trilogy" of five books (which sold more than fifteen million copies during his lifetime) as well as a television series, a comic book series, a computer game, and a feature film that was co ...more
More about Douglas Adams...

Other Books in the Series

Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy (6 books)
  • Young Zaphod Plays It Safe
  • The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy (Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, #1)
  • The Restaurant at the End of the Universe (Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, #2)
  • So Long, and Thanks for All the Fish (Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, #4)
  • Mostly Harmless (Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, #5)

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“The Guide says there is an art to flying", said Ford, "or rather a knack. The knack lies in learning how to throw yourself at the ground and miss.” 4562 likes
“It is a mistake to think you can solve any major problems just with potatoes.” 822 likes
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